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Terminology: US vs. UK - 1942

Capesofwrath

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Another one that I find interesting is the division of the medical profession into surgeons and physicians. It seems that in the UK all physicians are surgeons but not all surgeons are physicians.

Doctor's Office (US) = Surgery (UK)

The other way around actually.

It started because surgeons used to be barber surgeons who also let blood and took out teeth while physicians began as apothecaries. When things became more organised physicians and surgeons established colleges to regulate their affairs and the distinction between cutters and healers was established.

The two branches became more combined in Victorian times and nowdays a surgeon has to be an MD first and then qualify further. So he becomes a doctor first and then on further qualification becomes a mister. Surgeons are very proud of the title Mister too and will correct anyone who calls them doctor.
 
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MarkJohn

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Devon England
What about supper?

Supper for me, was always a late evening top-up, and was generally something similar to breakfast, i.e. a bowl of cereal or some toast... this was when growing up with my parents, and generally not something I do now... got to watch the waistline :(

Tea v Dinner... again for me, dinner was always the main meal of the day, which was, and still is, the evening meal, unless a midday Sunday roast is in the offing; something that happens less these days... otherwise eating during the day is 'lunch'.

Tea was always the Sunday afternoon 'high tea' following the roast, which would be sandwiches, followed by cake, biscuits and a cup of tea or two... as a kid I considered anyone calling their 'dinner' 'tea' to be 'common' :eek: what an awful snob I was :eeek:
 

davestlouis

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Cincinnati OH
Regional dialects and vocabulary are disappearing even within the US, at an alarming rate. Exposure to national TV with talking heads on there with bland, non-regional accents is dumbing down the language. Even as a child, my relatives from Northern Kentucky spoke differently than the ones who lived in Cincinnati...and all that separated them was a river. Denizens of the south side of St. Louis Missouri used to have a recognizable accent that has now become homogenized. My grandfather used to refer to his car as his "machine". He sat on the davenport, not the couch or sofa. He played records on his victrola, even though it looked just like my dad's turntable. Language is so fluid, it's amazing.
 
And many politicians desperately try to acquire a regional accent, especially in these days of parachuting preferred candidates into safe constituencies.

Re: dinner and tea. The midday meal was - and I assume still is - still referred to as dinner in the Scottish Borders, with evening meal being tea, and then supper just before bed. This is very regional, though. That was not the case in the North of Scotland, and certainly is not in the South of England.
 
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Two Types

I'll Lock Up
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I'm not sure about that regional division: It was always Dinner then tea for my family. And we are from the south (well, from the miscellaneous bit of the country where the East Midlands meets east Anglia and they both meet the south).
 

Shangas

I'll Lock Up
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Melbourne, Australia
To me, it's always been:

"Breakfast" = morning meal. (Between 9-11am)
"Luncheon" = midday meal. (11-2a/pm)
"Dinner"/"Tea" = Evening meal. (5-7pm).
"Supper" (if we have it at all, which isn't often) = Late night meal/snack. (anytime after 9pm).
 
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Orange County, CA
Expiration Date (US) = Sell By Date (UK)
Shots (US) = Jabs (UK)
Roommate (US) = Housemate (UK)
Co-worker (US) = Workmate (UK)
Prep School (US) = College (UK)
College (US) = University (UK)


Examples
US: "I'm in college majoring in history."
UK: "I'm reading history at University."
 
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galopede

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Gloucester, England
A Prep School in Britain is for kids up to around 11/12 at the oldest.

A college is usually part of a university, especially in Oxbridge which are made up of several separate colleges.

We used to have quite a few "Technical Colleges" which have mostly become universities over the years.

Gareth

By the way, I was nearly thrown off another nameless forum when I replied to "Your Favourite Dish" when I announced I love faggots and peas...
 
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Shangas

I'll Lock Up
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Melbourne, Australia
You'll have to remind me again. What are faggots? They're bundles of sticks, but they're also some type of food, aren't they? Like patties or something...
 

galopede

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Gloucester, England
You'll have to remind me again. What are faggots? They're bundles of sticks, but they're also some type of food, aren't they? Like patties or something...

Sort of a large meatball made with liver and other pork bits! They have always been popular in South Wales where I'm from and the English Midlands, where I think they call them savoury ducks!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faggot_(food)

The name often causes consternation over the pond but there again,they don't bat an eyelid at fanny packs! (We call them bum bags! Slightly less risky.)

Gareth
 

Hal

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UK
Roommate (US) = Housemate (UK)
Co-worker (US) = Workmate (UK)
"Roommate" is occasionally used in the UK if one is actually sharing a room. "Colleague" is much more frequent than "workmate.
Sort of a large meatball made with liver and other pork bits! They have always been popular in South Wales where I'm from and the English Midlands.
(Describing faggots) Also in south-western England. They are very like south German Leberknoedeln.
 
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galopede

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Gloucester, England
Personally, I've never tried Spotted Dick. But it sounds delicious...

My mother used to make that quite often when I were a lad. Good rib sticking stuff!

In South Wales, it was just called suet pudding. Simple and quick to make in a microwave these days though you need to eat it hot and fresh as it turns into a brick when it gets cold! Think I'll do one later. I prefer them with vegetarian suet though. Makes a lighter sponge.

Brain's Faggots are not very good. A good butcher makes much better ones.
 
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