Terms Which Have Disappeared

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by KILO NOVEMBER, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. FedoraFan112390

    FedoraFan112390 Practically Family

    Messages:
    643
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Even Nixon used it in press conferences as late as 1962, in the same meaning as "treating someone unfairly."
     
  2. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,202
    That's how the Door Man got his job!
     
  3. Espee

    Espee Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    southern California
    I'm going to plead Forum-Searching Ineptitude here. I think we had (and maybe I started) an examination of "I have a T. L. for you..." (1940s) and now years have passed and I can't find it for review.
    I forgot all about it until last week when I heard Molly McGee say it to Fibber.
     
  4. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "trade-last," a second-hand comment about someone that you offer to trade them in exchange for a comment they've heard about you. The idea of it being a "trade last" is that you don't tell them the comment until you've gotten yours in exchange. It's a nineteenth century thing that was vestigal in the early twentieth century.

    There's also a Yiddish explanation for "TL" that's unsuitable for the Lounge. The "T" in this explanation stands for "Toches," or backside.
     
  5. Espee

    Espee Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    southern California
    The compliment-related meaning might have been very much diluted by 3/9/1948, when Fibber realizes the leg of the card table is broken and that he'll have to try to call Doc Gamble before he leaves his house (on his way over to play checkers.) So Doc can bring his own card table...
    Molly says, "I've got a T.L. for you, Dearie... that IS Doctor Gamble's card table." Fibber had a habit of borrowing things, permanently.
    It's like the sarcastic use of "a news flash" or "breaking news."
     
  6. skydog757

    skydog757 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    465
    Location:
    Thumb Area, Michigan
    A phrase that will be lost on most people these days is "He's wound up tighter than an eight day clock".
     
  7. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,516
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    ^^^^^^

    To riff on that ...

    It's been some time since I've heard anyone use "tight" to mean "drunk." It was a common usage within my memory.

    "Tight" meaning "stingy" is still heard quite a bit.
     
  8. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "Papa come home late last night
    Mama said, 'Pop, you're tight'
    When he tried to find the light
    He faw down and go boom!
    Papa, he begin to sing
    Mama said, 'Bad old thing'
    Then she took a great big swing
    He faw down and go boom!"

    -- song made popular by Eddie Cantor, 1929
     
  9. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,202
    These days, tight means cool, as in, that song is tight! Tighten Up, used to be slang for a Promiscuous young lady, as in, she needs to tighten up, or she'll get in trouble!
     
  10. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

    Messages:
    909
    Location:
    Cheapeake Bay Drainage Basin
    "Hi, we're Archie Bell and the Drells, and we're from Houston, Texas ..."
     
  11. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,777
    Location:
    Gads Hill, Ontario
    There's a line in an episode of Jeeves and Wooster along the lines "He's not crazy, he's just tight as an owl!" (i.e. drunk).
     
  12. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,516
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    I can see how that usage came about. It's easy enough to, um, sense it, although it wasn't until now that it occurred to me. In that context (as well as others), it means essentially the opposite of "loose."
     
  13. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,202
    While I am more then old enough to remember when that came out in 1968, it is probably considered ancient history to most!
     
  14. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,808
    Location:
    Cobourg
    "And we don't only sing, we can dance just as good as we want"
     
  15. CONELRAD

    CONELRAD One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    263
    Location:
    The Metroplex
    On the topic of "tight"...

    [video=youtube;sqZRl0GY04o]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqZRl0GY04o[/video]
     
  16. skydog757

    skydog757 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    465
    Location:
    Thumb Area, Michigan
    I'd always heard the line as " We dance just as good as we walk"; meaning that that it was easy. My ears and memory might deceive me, though.
     
  17. The Good

    The Good Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,363
    Location:
    California, USA
    You don't really hear variations of "What the devil," or "What in blazes" anymore, to express astonishment, agitation, or disbelief. I can only guess they're very infrequently used or next to non-existant now, well after the 1960s have ended. I've heard some of those phrases on the original Star Trek, most memorably by DeForest Kelley as Dr. McCoy. I think I've come across those in other TV shows or films from that era, as well.
     
  18. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I sat what the devil all the time.
     
  19. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

    Messages:
    909
    Location:
    Cheapeake Bay Drainage Basin
    +1
     
  20. The Good

    The Good Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,363
    Location:
    California, USA
    Although I didn't say it, I wrote it on Facebook the other day.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.