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The Era -- Day By Day

LizzieMaine

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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Nov_27__1942_.jpg

(World events seem to be moving with considerable acceleration. I don't think we've seen the Eagle bust out headline type this large since the Dodgers won the pennant. Oh, and note the box at the bottom of the page. It would seem extremely likely that the prominent play given the mutuel total for Bowie is because it's today's winning number for policy players. If you bet 467, or any combination thereof, collect at your neighborhood candy store.)

Operations against the Axis on all fronts are "proceeding satisfactorily" according to Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson. At a press conference today in Washington, the Secretary observed that the Germans have "failed in all their objectives" this year in Russia, and will now be forced from an increasingly wide area unless they can stop the present Soviet counteroffensive. Mr. Stimson also pointed to the buildup of Allied forces in North Africa as a prelude to ousting the Nazis from Tunisia, although "a stiff fight" is anticipated when Marshal Erwin Rommel and the remnants of his Afrika Korps make their last stand at El Aghelia. In the Pacific, the Secretary praised the feat of American soldiers fighting their way thru the jungles of New Guinea as "one of the outstanding performances of the war," although, he noted, "much hard fighting awaits American forces in the Solomons." The situation, Mr. Stimson summarized, "is very favorable from our point of view."

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("We otta get t'ese f' Solly," suggests Joe. "Get'm in maroon, you know how he likes t'em flashy c'loes." "Won'eh if t'eyre sand proof?" ponders Sally. "Heh," hehs Joe. "At's Solly, awright. Awrways hangin' rouna beach.")

In Los Angeles, the former Peruvian Consul, implicated in a vivid divorce trial and now at the center of a child custody wrangle, declared today that personal criticism directed toward him over the affair is a "violation of the Good Neighbor Policy." Former consul Max De La Fuente was named in the recent divorce trial of Mr. and Mrs. Mark T. McKee, a case which accused the prominent airline executive of recruiting a "harem of love slaves," Mrs. McKee of improper conduct with Mr. De La Fuente, and De La Fuente himself of involvement in the disappearance of the McKees' two year old child after custody had been awarded to the father. "The evil implications and tendencies of these insults," declared the former consul in a public statement, "will be understood and shall not be forgotten by all Latin-Americans."

Officers of an American Legion post in Flushing declared today that they will fight for their right to conduct bingo games for charitable purposes. A special meeting of the William A. Leonard Post at 140-26 Franklin Avenue to plan the campaign in opposition to the present crackdown by Mayor LaGuardia and Police Commissioner Lewis J. Valentine on games of chance. Nearly a thousand persons were playing bingo at the Legion's hall when police raided and shut down the game last Wednesday, and when patrolmen surged into the hall and declared the game closed, most of them rose in a spontaneous demonstration, howling down the police to a chant of "WE WANT BINGO!" to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne." Post Commander Joseph Ollen noted that not only did bingo pay for the construction of the hall, the post has also contributed significantly to local war bond and Red Cross campaigns, and recently purchased 50,000 cigarettes to be sent to General MacArthur's men in the Pacific. "We had the biggest, best, and cleanest Bingo in New York," insisted Ollen, "At no time was any promoter connected with it. The games were run entirely by members of the post, with all profits going to the post."

Officials of the General Foods Corporation issued a statement today advising all stockholders in the company that they are entitled to no special privilege or consideration when it comes to coffee. Since the freeze on coffee sales and the announcement of rationing, the firm's New York office has been flooded with "requests and threats" from stockholders demanding one or two pounds of the company's coffee, insisting that, as part owners of the corporation, they are entitled to it. All such requests have been rejected with a letter pointing out that the Federal Government strictly prohibits such special considerations.

In Long Island City, a 65-year-old man was convicted of disorderly conduct after he sawed up benches in a small neighborhood park. James Dickinson, who lives not far from the little park near Nelson Memorial Chapel, 42nd Road and Hunter Street, told Magistrate Jenkin R. Hockert that he was outraged by the sight of "able bodied men" loitering on the benches when they should be in the Army or at least working at some defense job. He decided to do something about it, got out his saw, and had destroyed two benches and was at work on the third when a patrolman intervened. Magistrate Hockert admitted that he was sympathetic to Mr. Dickinson's point of view, but admonished him that he couldn't go around destroying city property. A $25 fine was imposed and then suspended, on the promise by Mr. Dickinson that he will send $15 to repair the benches. That was where the matter stood -- until Queens Borough President James A. Burke heard about the case. This morning, a crew from the Borough President's office arrived at the park and took away all the remaining benches.

The anti-discrimination clause in the Selective Service law will be put to the test in the case of a 36-year-old black gardener from Jamaica, Queens who is on trial for draft evasion. Thirty-six-year-old Winfield Lynn of 109-25 Union Hall Street, who is being held for refusing to report for induction, contends that under the anti-discrimination clause in the law, he cannot be required to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces which is segregated by race. Lynn maintains that he is ready and willing to serve in any military branch in which blacks are not segregated, but insists that any induction order requiring that he serve in a segregated unit is illegal. He is represented in the case by his brother, Conrad Lynn, who has subpoenaed New York City Selective Service Director Col. Arthur V. McDermott to testify in the case.

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("You distract her, I'll get the siphon.")

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(Yes, there's a legitimate question to be asked about whether able bodied men should be playing sports right now. But at least they aren't sitting around on benches. Well, all right, most of them are, but still...)

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(If there's any question at all of the low expectations Warners has for "Casablanca," it's that they opened it not in one of the Times Square prestige theatres, but in the Hollywood, which doesn't even have a functional entrance on the Broadway side. You have to go around to 51st Street to even get in. On the other hand, though, this will likely mean it'll show up in Brooklyn in a couple of weeks rather than six months from now.)

Aficionados of the daytime radio serials would do will to pick up this month's issue of Harper's Magazine, which includes a lengthy defense of the soap operas by Max Wylie. Entitled "Washboard Weepers," the essay contains a salient point all Americans should consider in these times -- "If you like radio, stick up for it. If you don't like it, complain about it. But complain in the charitable terms that bespeak your recognition of the tastes and the rights of others."

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(NOW YOU'RE IN FOR IT)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Nov_27__1942_(6).jpg

(On the other hand, don't knock it -- you know how hard it is to find help right now.)

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(If only you'd bet it all on 467.)

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(Medicine? Is that what they call a shot of rye?)

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(We saw Miss Glory at a drawing board yesterday, so perhaps she is Dale's personal avatar. And from the looks of panel four, she's already planning her escape.)
 
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LizzieMaine

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Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Fri__Nov_27__1942_.jpg

A "minor international incident?" C'mon, Maxie, you can do better than that.

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Keep your pants on, bud -- I hear that jail gets pretty chilly.

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GOT A WARRANT?

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"Zoog?"

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Take a number, buddy.

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Oh, Doc. You're so 1910.

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Not all saboteurs pour sand in engines.

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Rouge has more lives than Burma.

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"And the worst part of it is, I'll die without ever having gotten those two-toned corduroy pants."

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And he isn't even wearing a zoot suit.
 
Messages
16,041
Location
New York City
...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Nov_27__1942_(1).jpg



("We otta get t'ese f' Solly," suggests Joe. "Get'm in maroon, you know how he likes t'em flashy c'loes." "Won'eh if t'eyre sand proof?" ponders Sally. "Heh," hehs Joe. "At's Solly, awright. Awrways hangin' rouna beach.")
...

That's kind of Joe, but considering his own feet and the heat-oil rationing, he might want to get a box for himself as well.


...

In Long Island City, a 65-year-old man was convicted of disorderly conduct after he sawed up benches in a small neighborhood park. James Dickinson, who lives not far from the little park near Nelson Memorial Chapel, 42nd Road and Hunter Street, told Magistrate Jenkin R. Hockert that he was outraged by the sight of "able bodied men" loitering on the benches when they should be in the Army or at least working at some defense job. He decided to do something about it, got out his saw, and had destroyed two benches and was at work on the third when a patrolman intervened. Magistrate Hockert admitted that he was sympathetic to Mr. Dickinson's point of view, but admonished him that he couldn't go around destroying city property. A $25 fine was imposed and then suspended, on the promise by Mr. Dickinson that he will send $15 to repair the benches. That was where the matter stood -- until Queens Borough President James A. Burke heard about the case. This morning, a crew from the Borough President's office arrived at the park and took away all the remaining benches.
...

In a small bit of justice-system irony, Mr. Dickinson was placed in the same holding cell awaiting his court appearance as had been used to hold Barbara Taylor.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Nov_27__1942_(4).jpg



(If there's any question at all of the low expectations Warners has for "Casablanca," it's that they opened it not in one of the Times Square prestige theatres, but in the Hollywood, which doesn't even have a functional entrance on the Broadway side. You have to go around to 51st Street to even get in. On the other hand, though, this will likely mean it'll show up in Brooklyn in a couple of weeks rather than six months from now.)
...

It is pretty amazing to see "Casablanca's" low-key premiere. Kudos to Jane Corby for a pretty darn accurate review and for nailing the money scene. I guess it was considered such an unimportant picture, they didn't even assign it to Cohen to review. Although, he's been MIA for awhile I think.


...
Daily_News_Fri__Nov_27__1942_(1).jpg


Keep your pants on, bud -- I hear that jail gets pretty chilly.
...

The most surprising things are that they were able to get away with these crimes for so long and that the amounts (even adjusted for '42 dollars) seem so small. There's no way (unless there was an outlier we don't know about) their 48 or so robberies, all told, add up to anywhere near the $12,000 bail.


...
Daily_News_Fri__Nov_27__1942_(2).jpg



GOT A WARRANT?
...

What? You're not going to use your little helicopter to escape? What's the fun of having toys like that if you don't use them when you can?


And further...
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"Bogart? Well, he's OK. I guess..."

Jane's review is better, but both got it basically right - it's an outstanding movie. The worst - and it happens to any prolific reviewer - is having a scathing review hanging out there on a movie that goes on to become a classic.
 

LizzieMaine

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("Well," says Captain Louis Goldberg, "Dick Tracy don't need no warrant!")

The Congressional bloc that sought to postpone the implementation of nationwide gasoline rationing, due on December 1st, admitted defeat today but promised to take vengeance on Price Administrator Leon Henderson when the incoming Congress takes up appropriations bills in 1943. "The Price Administrator will learn," vowed Rep. Lyle Boren (D-Okla.), "what Congress thinks of his dictatorial methods and attacks on the patriotism of opponents of rationing." Rep. Boren then suggested that it is "entirely possible" that a rider may be attached to the next appropriation of funding for the Office of Price Administration barring any expenditure of the money so long as Henderson remains at the agency's head. "They have enough money to run until next June," stated Boren. "After that, we may be able to get rid of the whole setup." Addressing the House yesterday, Boren proposed a new slogan: "Billions for defense -- and 15 cents for Leon Henderson. And that's 15 cents too much!"

Meanwhile, the Senate committee investigating the war program is preparing to move its hearings to Kansas City, where midwestern mayors and governors will testify on Monday and Tuesday. Henderson and Rubber Director William M. Jeffers defending the nationwide rationing of gasoline before the committee yesterday, arguing that it is the only workable method for conserving the 1,000,000 tons of rubber now on the nation's 27,000,000 civilian automobiles. They maintained that the program will be administered on a "common sense basis," and pledged that farmers, as essential workers, will be entitled to all of the gasoline that they require.

Mayor LaGuardia today took full charge of the problem of moving an estimated 30,000 tons of scrap metal donated to the war effort in public campaigns last summer, after several large steel mills abruptly cancelled contracts to purchase the material from the city. The Mayor met today with George Sutherland, regional director of the War Production Board and two officials of War Materials, Incorporated, a subsidiary of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation which handles government purchases of vital materials, with an eye toward selling the metal directly to the Government. The meeting was called after city Commissioner of Purchases Albert Pleydell revealed a letter he received from the president of the Institute for Scrap Iron and Steel cancelling the agreement to take the metal "because the leading Eastern Pennsylvania steel mills" which were to purchase the scrap had instead found that "a higher grade of metal scrap" is now available to them elsewhere.

The Mayor's crusade to keep racing sheets off the city's newsstands will have to be tried in court. Granting a continuance of an injunction to prevent Licensing Commissioner Paul Moss from enforcing the ban against the sale of tipster sheets at newsstands licensed by the city, Supreme Court Justice Isidore Wasservogel declared that "a proper disposition of the rights of all parties cannot be made without a trial of the issues." The Mayor expressed surprise when informed of that ruling, and indicated that he would review Justice Wasservogel's decision in order to determine whether to challenge it by appeal or by legislation.

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(YEAH STUPID DONT BOTHER ME WITH YOUR TOAD PROBLEMS DON"T YOU KNOW THERE"S A WAR ON?)

The Eagle Editorialist congratulates the patriots of the French Navy at Toulon who showed "the true French spirit" by scuttling every single ship in the French fleet interned there, and calls their act "the first glimmer of hope for the rebirth of the true France" after two and a half years of "the craven Vichy regime."

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("We call them our four '3-A's")

Secrecy surrounds the sudden visit to the United States by Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, who arrived in Washington today for "medical treatment and conferences with President Roosevelt on Pacific war strategy." The exact whereabouts of the American-educated leader of China's embattled millions and one of the world's outstanding stateswomen were not disclosed, but it is understood that she will be a guest of Mrs. Roosevelt at the White House during her visit. It is believed that she has entered a Washington hospital for treatment of after-effects of injuries she suffered in an automobile accident near Shanghai during a Japanese bombing raid. This is Madame Chiang's first visit to the United States since she graduated from Wellesley College in 1917 as Mei-Ling Soong.

In Hollywood, comedian Bud Abbott must wait until Monday to learn a jury's decision on the charge he faces of public drunkenness. Abbott, the tall, lean straight man of the famous Abbott and Costello team, was arrested last week after he rushed into a police station during a blackout to protest the arrest of the manager of the restaurant Abbott owns on a charge of showing two amber lights. Police Lieutenant P. S. Halliburton testified that Abbott was "so drunk he had to be assisted by his brother, who was trying to take him home," but the comedian insists that he was "absolutely sober" at the time of the incident, during which Abbott denounced Police Sergeant Lynn Slaten as "a double crossing skunk" for arresting restaurant manager Murray Teff despite an understanding that "those lights were OK." Abbott testified that he had demanded a sobriety test after Lt. Halliburton arrested him, but he was denied one.

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(Ok, how about this: we're moving into a season where we expect to lose Reese and Reiser to the draft, Camilli -- unless he changes his mind -- to retirement, and Casey has already enlisted. So there's four name players gone right there. And Medwick better not make any long term plans, since Rickey already got rid of him once before because he thought he was getting old. So doesn't it follow that you want to keep someone around -- in whatever capacity -- who has a strong connection to the community, has a high public profile, is well-liked by his teammates, and who knows, might even be able to pitch a few games next year if things get rough. HUH? DOESN'T IT FOLLOW????)

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("3 Stooges On The Solomon Islands?" Do you really think that's a good idea?)

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(It's just that easy.)

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(Uh ,oh Scarlet! Better get back into your superhero outfit!)

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(WE'LL BAKE IT INTO A GIANT PIE! NO ONE WILL EVER KNOW!)

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(SEE I GIVE MY STUNT DOG A NICE WALK ON PART! WHEN YOU'RE AMERICA'S NUMBER ONE HERO DOG YOU CAN AFFORD TO BE GENEROUS)

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("But wait, didn't that guy, whatshisname that looked like Pat Ryan, didn't he already solve this case back in 'Mary Worth'?" "Mary who? Never heard of her.")
 

LizzieMaine

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And in the Daily News...

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Yeah, he looks perfectly sober to me.

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"O'Dwyer? A cheap publicity hound," sniffs Mayor -- uh -- Major John H. Amen.

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You'll find out.

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And so began Dr. Zee's new identity as "The Lone Surgeon."

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And none dare call it -- "hoarding."

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Yeah, "the Master Race."

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Haven't been around much, have ya hon?

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FIve and a half months? Already? How tempus doth fugit.

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Tsk, Emmy -- your aim's off.

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You didn't hear the "splat." You haven't gotten away with it until you hear the "splat."
 
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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Nov_28__1942_.jpg

("Well," says Captain Louis Goldberg, "Dick Tracy don't need no warrant!")
...

I was very happy to see the judge's pushback too. The entire attitude of LaGuardia on this has been over the top. Smart law enforcement knows the difference between a crime syndicate where you might push the boundaries on procedure a bit and a church bingo game.


...

The Congressional bloc that sought to postpone the implementation of nationwide gasoline rationing, due on December 1st, admitted defeat today but promised to take vengeance on Price Administrator Leon Henderson when the incoming Congress takes up appropriations bills in 1943. "The Price Administrator will learn," vowed Rep. Lyle Boren (D-Okla.), "what Congress thinks of his dictatorial methods and attacks on the patriotism of opponents of rationing." Rep. Boren then suggested that it is "entirely possible" that a rider may be attached to the next appropriation of funding for the Office of Price Administration barring any expenditure of the money so long as Henderson remains at the agency's head. "They have enough money to run until next June," stated Boren. "After that, we may be able to get rid of the whole setup." Addressing the House yesterday, Boren proposed a new slogan: "Billions for defense -- and 15 cents for Leon Henderson. And that's 15 cents too much!"
...

The power of the purse.


..

In Hollywood, comedian Bud Abbott must wait until Monday to learn a jury's decision on the charge he faces of public drunkenness. Abbott, the tall, lean straight man of the famous Abbott and Costello team, was arrested last week after he rushed into a police station during a blackout to protest the arrest of the manager of the restaurant Abbott owns on a charge of showing two amber lights. Police Lieutenant P. S. Halliburton testified that Abbott was "so drunk he had to be assisted by his brother, who was trying to take him home," but the comedian insists that he was "absolutely sober" at the time of the incident, during which Abbott denounced Police Sergeant Lynn Slaten as "a double crossing skunk" for arresting restaurant manager Murray Teff despite an understanding that "those lights were OK." Abbott testified that he had demanded a sobriety test after Lt. Halliburton arrested him, but he was denied one.
...

First Flynn, now Bud Abbott, what are Warner Bros' and Universal's versions of Eddie Mannix getting paid for?


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Nov_28__1942_(3).jpg



(Ok, how about this: we're moving into a season where we expect to lose Reese and Reiser to the draft, Camilli -- unless he changes his mind -- to retirement, and Casey has already enlisted. So there's four name players gone right there. And Medwick better not make any long term plans, since Rickey already got rid of him once before because he thought he was getting old. So doesn't it follow that you want to keep someone around -- in whatever capacity -- who has a strong connection to the community, has a high public profile, is well-liked by his teammates, and who knows, might even be able to pitch a few games next year if things get rough. HUH? DOESN'T IT FOLLOW????)
...

You're spot on. Doing anything else with Fitz would be nuts, but as I noted last week, you see it all the time where an outsider is brought in to run a business and he just doesn't have the understanding of the nuances and goodwill of a situation the way someone who's been with the organization does. Also, guys like Rickey don't like to be "told" what to do - too much advocacy by others can actually hurt Fitz' chances.


The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Nov_28__1942_(4).jpg
...


("3 Stooges On The Solomon Islands?" Do you really think that's a good idea?)
..

Did Radio City book Warner Bros. pictures? If so, once again we see how "Casablanca" is not being given "A movie" treatment. "Random Harvest" is a very good movie, but it's not nearly as good as the famous "round up the usual suspects" picture.

Kudos to Hedy, even in an 80-year-old scanned print, she still looks darn impressive.


...
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(Uh ,oh Scarlet! Better get back into your superhero outfit!)
...

Fortunately, she's able to wear it under her street clothes, while the cape bunches a bit, the rest is easy.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Nov_28__1942_(7).jpg


(WE'LL BAKE IT INTO A GIANT PIE! NO ONE WILL EVER KNOW!)
...

That might not be so simple, is flour being rationed?


...
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And so began Dr. Zee's new identity as "The Lone Surgeon."
...

"Shut up and do your job!" As hard as it is for us to believe today, many of the older guys I worked for out of college in the 1980s, talked like that. They'd get fired quickly today if they talked that way, but back then it was the norm for that generation and many of them didn't really mean anything by it. I worked for one guy who yelled at everyone, truly yelled and called you stupid at least 80% of the time and he was a good guy who fought for his team.

"The Lone Surgeon," if it was the 1970s, it would be a weekly one-hour TV show by Aaron Spelling Productions and, like most of his shows, a hit (with recycled plots from all his other shows).


...

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Haven't been around much, have ya hon?
...

Miss Canker is another example of the dictatorial '40s boss, but I'm not thinking she's really a good person underneath the gruffness. To be fair, though, based on the tie, society has probably not been too kind to her.
 

LizzieMaine

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Flour isn't rationed yet, but a lot of things will be going on the books early next year, so get it while you can.

Those bills must be stacked pretty tight if Dan can lean on them like that,

I'm pretty sure I've seen Warner films at Radio City, but they tend to emphasize MGM and RKO attractions there ahead of others. The Strand plays a lot of the prestige Warner pictures, but I don't know as I'd rank "Gentleman Jim" as such. It'd be interesting to know the thinking behind why these particular films were booked as they were. Clearly the marketing push for "Casablanca" is no more than you'd expect for any routine programmer of the day. "Maltese Falcon," though, if I recall right, got much better play.
 
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Flour isn't rationed yet, but a lot of things will be going on the books early next year, so get it while you can.

Those bills must be stacked pretty tight if Dan can lean on them like that,

I'm pretty sure I've seen Warner films at Radio City, but they tend to emphasize MGM and RKO attractions there ahead of others. The Strand plays a lot of the prestige Warner pictures, but I don't know as I'd rank "Gentleman Jim" as such. It'd be interesting to know the thinking behind why these particular films were booked as they were. Clearly the marketing push for "Casablanca" is no more than you'd expect for any routine programmer of the day. "Maltese Falcon," though, if I recall right, got much better play.

Let's not forget, Dan's stacked pretty tight himself :).

Cool info on Radio City - thank you. It's really amazing how "Casablanca" is just coming and going. The most interesting thing about "Gentleman Jim" (a decent run-of-the-mill pic) right now is that Flynn's also on trial in real life.

Twenty-five-plus years ago, when NYC still had a robust revival theater game, "Casablanca" and "The Maltese Falcon" would have made a heck of a double feature. An even more "inside-movie-history" double feature would have been "Satan Met a Lady" followed by "The Maltese Falcon."

Separately but related, has anyone seen IMDB's new page layouts? I hate them.
 

LizzieMaine

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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Nov_29__1942_.jpg

(Bloomingdales, huh? What, you couldn't get into Loeser's?)

A kerchief covering her shaved head, Toni Jo Henry had no final words as she died yesterday afternoon in the Louisiana electric chair, the first woman ever to be electrocuted by that state. Executed for the 1940 murder of motorist J. P. Calloway, who had given her a lift in her car, Toni Jo "admitted to fear" as she spent a sleepless night before her date with the chair talking with a deputy sheriff after begging not to be left alone. The 26-year-old former prostitute and wife of convicted killer Claude "Cowboy" Henry wore a black crepe dress as she made her way down the stairs into the execution chamber shortly after 12 noon, accompanied by the Catholic priest who had become her spiritual advisor, and smiled at the executioner as he removed the kerchief and placed the death cap in position. At 12:12 pm, a prison doctor pronouncerd her dead.

Air forces under the command of U. S. Brig. Gen. Claire L. Chennault smashed into three Japanese strongholds in central China yesterday, dropping more than 1000 bombs totalling 48 tons onto targets at Hankow, Hsienning, and Yochow, all the sites of key Japanese bases. Military headquarters were hit in the raids, along with oil storage tanks, docks, munitions dumps, and a railroad station where Japanese troops were caught in the midst of detraining.

Soviet Premier Josef Stalin yesterday sent a personal cablegram of congratulations to Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson on the successes of American and British armies in the North African campaign. "These successes," stated the cable, "foreshadow and bring closer the shattering blow by the combined forces of our three nations against our common enemy, Hitler's tyranny."

Although he had lived without water, and had had only half an orange to eat in 22 days, Eddie Rickenbacker was "in excellent shape" when rescued from a rubber life boat in the mid-Pacific, according to Navy pilot Lt. Joseph Inser, a member of the crew that rescued Rickenbacker and his seven crew members. The men, who had been cast adrift when their plane crashed, had lashed their life rafts together and shared four oranges during their three week ordeal -- all of the food they had been able to salvage from their plane before it sank. Seventeen hours after his rescue, said Lt. Inser, Rickenbacker climbed unaided into his plane "in good humor," and en route to a naval hospital, ordered Inser to stop at another mid-Pacific base "to pick up some soup and ice cream."

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("Whoa boy!")

A 26-year-old Park Slope woman who separated from her husband last May and is currently employed in a defense plant was denied custody of her three-year-old daughter yesterday in Brooklyn Supreme Court. Justice Henry G. Wentzel Jr. awarded custody of the child, Barbara, to her father Henry Weglicki of 357 16th Street, telling the mother, Mrs. Josephine Weglicki, that he "did not believe the story" that her husband had ordered her to go to work. "The father," declared Justice Wentzel, "is of the old-fashioned type who believes that parents' lives should be dedicated to the welfare and happiness of their children. The wife believes that she has a life to live and intends to live it without permitting the cares and duties of motherhood to encroach too much upon her desires for a good time." Mrs. Weglicki had testified that she left her husband "because she could no longer stand to live with her in-laws." Mr. Weglicki asserted that his wife did not love their daughter, because even before the separation, she had placed the child in a nursery.

In St. Louis, Missouri, a prominent bone specialist was shot to death by a woman who declared that she had killed him in order to "save the rest of the world from him." Dr. Marion L. Klienfelter was shot three times with a revolver by 29-year-old Frances Ferrara, a former patient, on the fourth floor of the Missouri Baptist Hospital. According to an assistant to Dr. Kleinfelter who witnessed the shooting, Miss Ferrara greeted the doctor with "hello madman!" before she drew the gun from her coat and fired the shots. She then escaped from the hospital but was arrested nearby.

Convicted racketeer overlord of an underworld empire Louis "Lepke" Buchhalter and his two henchmen Emmanuel "Mendy" Weiss and Louis Capone, will throw themselves upon the mercy of the State in a clemency hearing on Thursday, in a final effort to save themselves from the electric chair for the 1936 murder of Brownsville candy store operator Joseph Rosen. The three were sentenced to die at Sing Sing Prison on December 2nd by Judge Franklin Taylor after they were convicted in the Rosen slaying, a gangland attempt to silence a man who "knew too much" about Buchhalter's operations as the czar of a violent cadre of thugs and killers preying on businessmen. Bucchalter is already serving a fourteen year Federal prison term on a narcotics conviction, and that sentence would have to be commuted before he could be delivered to New York State authorities for execution. The convictions of Bucchalter, Weiss, and Capone were affirmed on October 30th by the Court of Appeals, although the decision to affirm the conviction was "sharply divided."

Brooklyn women are being urged to donate old furs to the Civilian Defense Volunteer Office so that they may be remade into warm garments for the men of the U. S. Merchant Marine. Whole coats are wanted, no matter how old, along with fur accessories like Grandmother's old muff from the Gay 90s, fur collars salvaged from coats otherwise long since worn out, and any other fur scraps that may be found in the attic. Any kind of fur will do -- deodorized skunk, pseudo-mink, minkless mink, raccoon, glorified alley cat -- and will be stitched into the linings of vests that will keep America's merchant seamen warm over the icy winter ahead. More than 30,000 furs have already been turned in, and more are needed.

Cigar smokers are being asked to be gentlemen as they puff their stogies. A list of guidelines published by the Cigar Institute of America from its sumptuous Rockefeller Center offices, advises smokers to "not puff incessantly in small, crowded rooms," to "dispose of dead ends as soon as possible, even if the ash trays have to be emptied more frequently, to "not talk with the cigar in your mouth," to "not chew the cigar, as it impairs the flavor of the smoke," and if the ash falls on the carpet, to not say "it keeps the moths away. Most women would sooner have the moths." But the foremost rule for gentlemanly cigar smoking? "Do not light up until you make sure that no one objects."

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("Hey lookit," observes Joe. "Says heah MacPhail is in Leavenwoit'!" "RIGHT WHEAH HE BELOWNGS!" roars Sally. "WHAT HE DONE TO PETEY WAS CRIMIN'L!")

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(And just like that, Margie Hart wonders who she has to talk to about a career in opera.)

Ingrid Bergman, star of "Casablanca," says she never wanted to go to Hollywood at all, and in fact David Selznick begged her for two years to leave her native Sweden before she finally acquiesced. She has since appeared five films, including her present release opposite Humphrey Bogart and Paul Henreid, and a sixth, "For Whom The Bell Tolls," is forthcoming. But one thing she has not done, nor will she do, is present herself for "cheesecake" photos. At first, she found it impossible to understand why anyone would wish to photograph, or view photographs of, a cheesecake -- and when she finally learned that the term refers to "leg art" pictures, she made it clear that she was not interested in that particular form of publicity.

Old Timer Cecil Johnson notes the present recrudescence of beards among a certain literary and theatrical crowd, but says the current trend has nothing on the wide variety of facial adornments affected by Brooklyn gentlemen of the '60s. Eighty years ago, he says, whiskers of every sort were rampant, and a review of pictures of Aldermen in a Common Council manual of 1866 bears him out -- only one smooth-shaven face appears in the entire book, that of Tenth Ward Alderman Francis Kelly, while all of his colleagues wear a wide assortment of full facial wreaths, "sideboards," chin and neck whiskers, ornate moustaches, and other such decorations. Perhaps the most remarkable facial crop was raised by Corporation Counsel J. D. Schumacher, whose "whiskers branched out from either side of his face like wings on an airplane."

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(It is pretty darn kinky, at that.)

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(Never mind the flowers, I want to hear what the cockatoo has to say.)

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(Looks like the kid from "Sparky Watts" has found work.)

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(Effect meets cause.)

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(Dr. Matt has lost sight of the mission. And Dan, jeez, I hate to break this to ya, bud, but there hasn't been any such thing as a $2000 bill in a hundred years, YOU DOPE.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(9).jpg

(Gotta say I rarely take the time to examine a mosquito's posture before I squoosh it.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,497
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sun__Nov_29__1942_.jpg

Just out of curiosity, how tall is *Mr.* Levinson?

Daily_News_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(1).jpg

On the other hand, sales of headache remedies have never been better.

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Oh, this'll be EVER SO MUCH FUN.

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Mr. Am is an unusual figure who shows up from time to time, and in Mr. Gray's peculiar cosmology he may or may not be, but is strongly hinted to be, an actual physical manifestation of -- um -- God. So rather than prattling away with Annie, wouldn't you think he'd want to check in on Sam the Presser?

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("Golly, Cousin Juniper -- when we're not off somewhere having fun adventures, you're actually kind of a boob.")

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Just another missed opportunity, eh kid?

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And after the war, Jack and Cindy hope to tour the country with their synchronized-punching act.

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Ha ha, Walt has to ride a bike to work. NO B-CARD FOR YOU!

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Wait, Shadow is living with Goofy and Honey now? Did we miss the part where Pop Jenks says to Ma Smart "IT"S THAT KID OR ME?"

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Ha ha, Moon fell out of the window naked! What will Mrs. Booblebaum think of THAT?
 
Messages
16,041
Location
New York City
...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(1).jpg



("Whoa boy!")
...

Is it really a bad thing when you can't hear Kay Francis' particular "style" of elocution?


...

Old Timer Cecil Johnson notes the present recrudescence of beards among a certain literary and theatrical crowd, but says the current trend has nothing on the wide variety of facial adornments affected by Brooklyn gentlemen of the '60s. Eighty years ago, he says, whiskers of every sort were rampant, and a review of pictures of Aldermen in a Common Council manual of 1866 bears him out -- only one smooth-shaven face appears in the entire book, that of Tenth Ward Alderman Francis Kelly, while all of his colleagues wear a wide assortment of full facial wreaths, "sideboards," chin and neck whiskers, ornate moustaches, and other such decorations. Perhaps the most remarkable facial crop was raised by Corporation Counsel J. D. Schumacher, whose "whiskers branched out from either side of his face like wings on an airplane."
...

Why in God's name would the fine British actress Celia Johnson be commenting on beards on American men, pause, pause, pause, oh "Cecil" not "Celia," never mind, all is good, carry on.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(5).jpg



(Never mind the flowers, I want to hear what the cockatoo has to say.)
...

William M. Jeffers didn't do that because he's so dedicated to his job; he did it because he's a train geek (I'd do the same thing if I could).

That's a great idea Cesar Romero had until the first time he had to go to the bathroom wearing it.


The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(8).jpg
...


(Dr. Matt has lost sight of the mission. And Dan, jeez, I hate to break this to ya, bud, but there hasn't been any such thing as a $2000 bill in a hundred years, YOU DOPE.)
...

The wallpaper is a stupid plan even for Dan Dunn.


...
Daily_News_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(2).jpg



Oh, this'll be EVER SO MUCH FUN.
...

What's happened to Frizzletop, did she lose her unpaid job? I've came to like her and her train wreck of a life.


...
Daily_News_Sun__Nov_29__1942_(9).jpg


Wait, Shadow is living with Goofy and Honey now? Did we miss the part where Pop Jenks says to Ma Smart "IT"S THAT KID OR ME?"
...

Sundays in "Harold Teen" seem like some sort of parallel universe to its other six days.
 
Last edited:

LizzieMaine

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Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Nov_30__1942_.jpg
Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Nov_30__1942_(1).jpg

(I never enter a building with a revolving door without thinking of the Cocoanut Grove.)

Food will be scarcer in 1943, despite record crops in 1942, and Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard today appealed to farmers for a "dawn to dusk effort" to increase food production to better feed not just the United States but the United Nations. Secretary Wickard called for a 10 percent increase in livestock products, which must be accomplished without any reduction in crop acreage, especially an increase in the production of meat and milk, poultry and eggs. This will mean, he indicated, a reduction in the amount of wheat grown in favor of corn, potatoes, peanuts, dry beans, and peas. The Secretary also recommended a reduction in the short-staple cotton crop in favor of in an increase in the long-staple variety. But he warned that even a fourth consecutive year of record crops would fall short of the food requirements of the United Nations, and he warned consumers to expect that many food products will be rationed during 1943. At least one quarter of all food to be produced in the United States in the year ahead is already earmarked for U. S. Military and Lend-Lease requirements.

American aviators are closely watching Japanese activity in the islands north of Guadalcanal, in an effort to prevent another great concentration of enemy forces for a major offensive. As a result of that vigilance, American planes have attacked enemy shipping and shore establishments in the Munda Bay area of the North Georgia Islands, about 250 miles south of Guadalcanal, twice within the past week. The Navy revealed in a communique last night that American planes made another raid Saturday night on enemy shipping, but damage reports were not given.

Flying Fortresses have repelled a fifth Japanese attempt to land reinforcements on their Buna beachhead in New Guinea, with the Allied force scoring direct hits on two destroyers, and forcing two other destroyers to retreat.

Part of the garrison of French Somaliland on the East African coast has crossed the frontier into British Somaliland to join the Allied forces, according to a report from the Vichy Havas News Agency. One artillery unit and many civilians marched with those troops.

Thirty thousand tons of scrap metal collected by salvage campaigns in Brooklyn last summer were officially turned over to the Federal Government today, as Controller Joseph McGoldrick signed the necessary papers this morning in his Brooklyn home, bringing to an end several weeks of bickering over the disposition of the materials. The War Production Board and the Metals Reserve Company Incorporated, a subsidiary of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, now take charge of the mountains of scrap and will discuss today the specifics of removing the material for reprocessing. The arrangement clears the way for a new salvage campaign beginning today in West Flatbush under the direction of the Civilian Defence Volunteers Council. Operating from a door-to-door inventory of available metal and rubber collected previously by Boy Scouts, volunteers will canvass West Flatbush homes for collection, with the Automotive Safety Foundation having arranged for storage depots to be established at 400 Brooklyn gasoline stations.

A four year old boy from East Flatbush was killed last night and his 9 year old brother was injured in a hit-and-run accident on Linden Boulevard near Albany Avenue. Police are looking for the driver responsible for the death of Bobby Martin of 492 Clarkson Avenue and the injury of his older brother Jerome, who were crossing Linden Boulevard in the rain as they headed home after watching a motion picture show. Police were told that the car "sped away" after striking the boys. Jerome Martin is hospitalized at Kings County Hospital with a fractured left knee, facial contusions, scalp lacerations, and possible internal injuries. Their parents are Mr. and Mrs. James Martin, and their father is an attendant at Brooklyn State Hospital two blocks from the accident scene. Another of their sons, Staff Sgt. Matthew Francis Martin, died at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts, on September 15th while serving in the Army Quartermaster Corps.

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(Get it while you can, folks.)

City Councilman Louis P. Goldberg writes in to stress that he was strongly opposed to the present law mandating stirrup pumps as part of auxiliary firefighting equipment because he didn't believe it proper to place such equipment "in a straightjacket." He notes that the entire American Labor Party delegation to the Council proposed a more flexible approach to such equipment, allowing changes to be easily made as new methods were developed for fighting incendiary bombs, and one which, in the event of shortages of specific equipment, allowed for buildings most in need of such equipment, such as defense plants and slum dwellings, to be first supplied. "I still think," Councilman Goldberg declares, "that the present law should be repealed and a law based on the principles of my proposed law should be enacted in its place."

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(This is what happens when your spy is a member of the Dies Committee.)

A 60-year-old Flatbush woman was paroled for further hearing today on charges that she ran a gambling parlor out of her home at 248 E. 54th Street. The home of Mrs. Kate Berger was raided by Patrolman Christopher Pesther who testified before Magistrate Thomas H. Cullen Jr. in Week-End Court that twelve women and a man were discovered playing poker around a large table in the house, with Mrs. Berger's take, amounting to ninety cents in change, found in a bowl in the center of the table.

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("If only I knew where to find a 35-year-old power-hitting fancy-fielding first baseman with six children and a rock-solid III-A draft status, I'D PAY HIM ANYTHING HE WANTED." "Sir, you've dozed off again. "You're dreaming." "Ah, so I am, my boy, so I am. Ridiculous things, dreams, are they not? Yes, my boy, ridiculous. Now then. Any word yet on Dahlgren?")

Little Ben Hogan, the golfing Gael from Dublin, Texas, heads for the Army Air Corps today. The leading money winner of the professional tour in 1942, with $13,143, Hogan yesterday resigned his position as club pro at the Hershey, Pennsylvania Country Club and departed for a civilian flying school in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he will prepare for Air Corps service.

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(GOOD! YOU'RE STUPID! AND YOUR MOUSTACHE IS STUPID TOO!)

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("I'M MOVING IN! MY TRUNK WILL BE DELIVERED TOMORROW! AND I DON"T GO FOR SHARING THE BATHROOM!")

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("I'll be dipped in sweet chocolate!" Let's keep your personal life out of this.)

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(Pop has pull with the Associated Press. He knows this guy whose cousin works in an engraving room.)

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(Oh, sure, I used to know the Skelegans. Lived over in the next block, had a lot of kids. Their house always smelled like cabbage.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,497
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Mon__Nov_30__1942_.jpg

How to say you don't know what really happened without saying you don't know what really happened.

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"Dammit!" snaps Margie. "I never *could* do pigtails!"

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Welcome to the 20th Century, Doc.

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Always keep your eye on the rear view mirror.

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Yeah, well, make sure you collect that rent right off.

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"You're kidding, right?"

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"I'm quartered in a harem. At least it used to be one." Ah, you're stationed in California then. Say hello to Mr. McKee for us.

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What, AGAIN?

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"Say, isn't this where they built that big hydroelectric dam? Uh oh."

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Mamie does have a hard life.
 
Messages
16,041
Location
New York City
Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Nov_30__1942_(2).jpg
...


(Get it while you can, folks.)
...

I'm surprised to see silk stockings so readily available as all the stories you read and movies, etc., from the period make it seem like you couldn't find a new silk stocking to save your life during the war.


...

A 60-year-old Flatbush woman was paroled for further hearing today on charges that she ran a gambling parlor out of her home at 248 E. 54th Street. The home of Mrs. Kate Berger was raided by Patrolman Christopher Pesther who testified before Magistrate Thomas H. Cullen Jr. in Week-End Court that twelve women and a man were discovered playing poker around a large table in the house, with Mrs. Berger's take, amounting to ninety cents in change, found in a bowl in the center of the table.
...

Ninety cents, that's about $16 today. Good use of the police and court's resources. Thankfully, it's not as if there's a war going on.



...
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"Dammit!" snaps Margie. "I never *could* do pigtails!"
...

Didn't seem to do Mae West's career any harm.


...
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"You're kidding, right?"
...

According to the Eagle's front page, this ruse in unnecessary as you can still buy all the coffee you want.


And further...
Daily_News_Mon__Nov_30__1942_(3).jpg

Even though he has as solid argument, saying "it can't happen here" is always dangerous.
 

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