Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds

The Era -- Day By Day

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_.jpg

("I can't wait to get home an' sleep in my own bed," sighs Joe. "C'mon, finish packin'. Wheah's Stella? Get her inna grip!" "I tol' ya, we oughta wait anot'eh night," replies Sally. "I wen' oveh t'is mawrnin' while you was sleepin' t' check, anna lan'loehd was inneah paint'na kitchen." "Paint'n?" reacts Joe, his eyes wide. "'At jernt ain' been painted since Cleveland was pres'd'nt." "He said Uncle Frank give'm t'ideeh. He says Uncle Frank ev'n got'm a deal onna paint. See, Uncle Frank's got a cousin runs a hawrdweah stoeh. Made'm a special price." "Good ol' Uncle Frank," marvels Joe. "Yep," nods Sally. "Jus' like a fa't'eh to us. I eveh tell ya how he got Mickey his fois' job? Drivin' a d'livery truck when he was jus' fifteen yeeahs ol'." "D'liverin' paint?" inquires Joe. "Nah," shrugs Sally. "Mickey neveh said, but I don' t'ink it was paint.")

American and Australian troops, their Papuan campaign completed with the mopping-up of straggling Japanese fugitives at Sanandana prepared last night for the next step in General Douglas MacArthur's victorious campaign. MacArthur's planes did not let up in their relentless offensive against Japanese shipping north of New Guinea. Today's communique reported that Allied bombers had destroyed four Japanese ships, aggregating 24,000 tons, in an attack on Rabaul Harbor, New Britain. The Japanese struck back aerially at Milne Bay, at New Guinea's tip, at Meruke, on the south coast of Dutch New Guinea, and at Darwin, Australia, but caused no damage.

In Eugene, Oregon, authorities are investigating the death of a 21-year-old woman who tumbled out of a lower berth aboard a sleeping car of a speeding Southern Pacific train with her throat cut. Mrs. Martha Virginia James, the wife of Navy Ensign Richard F. James, had been separated from her husband on the trip when the train was divided into two sections at Portland. The couple was en route from Seattle to Los Angeles under Navy orders, and authorities said there was no indication that the woman had associated with any other passengers aboard the train after she was separated from her husband. A Marine sleeping in the berth above that of Mrs. James, Private Harold R. Wilson, told detectives he was awakened by the sound of a "stifled scream" coming from the lower, and then heard the thud of Mrs. James' body as it rolled out of the berth and into the aisle. As he peered thru the curtain, Pvt. Wilson told police, he saw "a man in a pinstriped suit hurrying away." He further stated that the man may have been a Negro, but he was uncertain of this. Police found no such man aboard the train, and guessed that he might have gotten off the train at Tangent, Oregon, about 40 miles from Eugene. Police found $114 in cash in Mrs. James' purse, ruling out robbery as a motive.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(1).jpg

(Say what you will about Butch, but he is an honest man. And the committee should definitely take a closer look at the Flynn & Goldwater firm's dealings with Mr. Rubinstein, a White Russian con man who poses as a Portuguese nobleman, and who is involved in any number of highly dubious activities.)

Bootleg phonograph records made by mysterious pseudonymous orchestras in violation of the American Federation of Musicians' current recording ban are now circulating in Brooklyn shops, and hepcats are keeping busy trying to figure out who the performers might actually be. The latest underground release by the "Classic Record Company," an enterprise of former Victor Records executive Eli Oberstein, is credited to one "Hal Goodman and his Orchestra," and features two selections written by Cole Porter for the current Ethel Merman Broadway revue "Something For The Boys." The first song, "Could It Be You?," opens with a high-pitched reed-and-brass arrangement typical of the Glenn Miller band before giving over to a male vocalist. Following the vocal, the orchestra continues in what appears to be a stock arrangement to the end of the song. The other side of the record features "He's A Right Guy," played in a rhumba arrangement, with a female vocalist and no instrumental solos at all.

Bombers named after Brooklyn neighborhoods will pound Berlin in a new bond-selling campaign kicked off yesterday by Borough President John Cashmore. Under the program, every neighborhood subscribing at least $350,000 in bond sales will have a Flying Fortress named after it -- "Flatbush," or "Bay Ridge," or "Brownsville," or "Bushwick," to name a few possibilities. Savings banks in each section of the borough will act as local headquarters for the drive, and model military planes made by local youths will be displayed in the windows of each bank to advertise the campaign.

The Eagle Editorialist demands an end to "Nazi-style outrages" against Brooklyn Jews, with the recent desecration of Congregation Ahavath Israel just the latest example. These outrages continue, notes the EE, despite the recent warning by Commissioner of Investigation William Herlands that incidents of Nazi-inspired, or even Nazi-directed anti-Semitism are on the increase thruout the city -- and especially in Brooklyn. The EE reprimands the police fand civic authorities for "investigating" but doing nothing beyond that to stop the "criminals and fanatics -- and those who incite and possess their moronic souls with the evil spirits of racial and religious hatred."

Reader Mary Clark writes in to say that while women may find it "safe and helpful" to wear overalls while working in defense jobs, she declares that the Bible forbids any interchange of garments between men and women. She cites Deuteronomy 22:5, which declares that those who do so are "abominations to the Lord."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(2).jpg

("A half inch shy of 6' 9?" Hey kid, ever hear of elevator shoes?)

Old Timer Arthur V. Olmstead read recently the claim that the famous Civil War ironclad U. S. S. Monitor was "built in Manhattan." He produces extensive documentation in the form of letters from the Navy Department Office of Naval Records and Library to prove that the Monitor was built and launched at Greenpoint, Brooklyn on January 30, 1862, and was then towed to the New York Navy Yard where finishing work was done and the ship commissioned, and he further cites many encyclopedia articles in support of this statement.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(3).jpg

(Chocolate milk? I thought Leon banned that.)

Radio actor Raymond Edward Johnson makes his Broadway debut next week next Friday in the role of Thomas Jefferson, in Sidney Kingsley's new drama "The Patriot." Johnson distinguished himself on the air for years with his prominent roles in the dramas of Arch Oboler, and in a broadcast serialization of Somerset Maugham's "Of Human Bondage." But today's listeners might know him best as "Raymond," the kiddie-frightening murderous-voiced host behind the squeaking door of the "Inner Sanctum." Johnson began his acting career a decade ago, after growing tired of his previous jobs as a golf caddy, a soda jerk, a bookkeeper, and a bank teller in his home town of Kenosha, Wisconsin.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(4).jpg

(LET"S HEAR IT FOR AMERICA'S NUMBER ONE HERO RAT!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(5).jpg

(Alice Marble would slap down Mr. Kovacs so hard if she wasn't otherwise occupied just now.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(6).jpg

(Yeah, this is going to get old fast.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(7).jpg

(Gargantua resents this joke.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(8).jpg

("A bunny, Unca Bill? A DEAD BUNNY? WHAAAAAAA!" Oh, Mr. Andriola, it seems, REALLY HATES IRWIN even more than Pinson did. Better look into that opening at "Hugh Striver" before it's too late.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(9).jpg

(Mr. Hix just wanted to draw a drunk lion today, that's all.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily news...

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_.jpg

Flynn's going to claim he was confused and thought he was *playing the role of* Captain Owen Cathcart-Jones, because, jeez, it's a natural.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(1).jpg

And then there's the artist who waits to the last minute to get an idea for this week's page...

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(2).jpg

EVERYBODY"S GOT A TUNNEL! EVERYBODY!

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(3).jpg

And to think they kicked him out of the Navy for flat feet.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(4).jpg

Should've gone with the wedding gown.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(5).jpg

And Zack Mosley's pall Sidney Nesbit says "HEY!"

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(6).jpg

And they never even guessed it was horsemeat.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(7).jpg

"Big Chief Stiff-In-The-Joints." Tsk.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(8).jpg

Aw, Flip never gets to have any fun.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(9).jpg

It's probably just a janitor's closet. I mean, these marble floors don't buff themselves.
 
Messages
16,045
Location
New York City
("I can't wait to get home an' sleep in my own bed," sighs Joe. "C'mon, finish packin'. Wheah's Stella? Get her inna grip!" "I tol' ya, we oughta wait anot'eh night," replies Sally. "I wen' oveh t'is mawrnin' while you was sleepin' t' check, anna lan'loehd was inneah paint'na kitchen." "Paint'n?" reacts Joe, his eyes wide. "'At jernt ain' been painted since Cleveland was pres'd'nt." "He said Uncle Frank give'm t'ideeh. He says Uncle Frank ev'n got'm a deal onna paint. See, Uncle Frank's got a cousin runs a hawrdweah stoeh. Made'm a special price." "Good ol' Uncle Frank," marvels Joe. "Yep," nods Sally. "Jus' like a fa't'eh to us. I eveh tell ya how he got Mickey his fois' job? Drivin' a d'livery truck when he was jus' fifteen yeeahs ol'." "D'liverin' paint?" inquires Joe. "Nah," shrugs Sally. "Mickey neveh said, but I don' t'ink it was paint.")
...

Painting! Ma's got more "pull" than we thought.


...

Reader Mary Clark writes in to say that while women may find it "safe and helpful" to wear overalls while working in defense jobs, she declares that the Bible forbids any interchange of garments between men and women. She cites Deuteronomy 22:5, which declares that those who do so are "abominations to the Lord."
...

Does this mean I can get my girlfriend to give me back my good heavy sweatshirt, which was "borrowed" many years ago and never made it back to my closet?


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(5).jpg



(Alice Marble would slap down Mr. Kovacs so hard if she wasn't otherwise occupied just now.)
...

Agreed, Kovacs' brand of humor sounds irritating.

Enjoy it while you can Vidkum, you don't have that many years left. Although, your name will live on as a synonym for "traitor" into eternity, so you will have that, *sshole.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(7)-2.jpg


(Gargantua resents this joke.)
...

There's no need to go overboard, as many do today, with the proposal hoopla, but maybe you can do better than a hotel lobby.

"What did you ask me? I couldn't hear you over the boy paging that man."


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(8).jpg


("A bunny, Unca Bill? A DEAD BUNNY? WHAAAAAAA!" Oh, Mr. Andriola, it seems, REALLY HATES IRWIN even more than Pinson did. Better look into that opening at "Hugh Striver" before it's too late.)
...

The hate these writers have shown for Irwin is stunning, almost shocking. Normally, you don't switch jobs to go to a lesser company, but I agree, Irwin should take any out he can get, even if it's "Hugh Striver." Heck, maybe he could get work in advertising - Davega could use a lovable dunce as a mascot in its print ads. "Sandy, over here boy, leave the toy squirrel alone and get on the phone and see what you can do for Irwin."


And in the Daily news...
Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_.jpg


Flynn's going to claim he was confused and thought he was *playing the role of* Captain Owen Cathcart-Jones, because, jeez, it's a natural.
...

Ursula Parrott clearly has some enemies in high places, as this one should have been quietly cleaned up and forgotten long ago.


...

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(9)-2.jpg

It's probably just a janitor's closet. I mean, these marble floors don't buff themselves.

Based on the movies, the "secret panel in the castle wall" was a well-worn trope even by 1943. Plus, come on, a castle is how many tens of thousands of square feet, what are the odds of accidentally leaning in just the right place?


...
Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(2)-2.jpg


EVERYBODY"S GOT A TUNNEL! EVERYBODY!
...

Basements 'r Us has a Tunnels 'r Us division that's more profitable than its Roof-decks 'r Us division.


...
Daily_News_Sun__Jan_24__1943_(5).jpg


And Zack Mosley's pall Sidney Nesbit says "HEY!"
...

This is one of the better "Smilin' Jack" storylines in awhile - the radio stuff is neat. Plus, in a few more days, Cindy should be all but naked.
 
Last edited:

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_.jpg

("Well," sighs Joe, leaning back and basking in the waves of warmth beaming from the Loeser's heater, "it's good t'be home." "I'm not so soiten about t'is coleh he pain'ed t'kitchen," comments Sally. "I like green, but I dunno about *t'is* green." "Maybe y'should tell Uncle Frank," mutters Joe, sipping a spoonful of oatmeal. "Nah," replies Sally. "I would'n bot'eh him wit' sump'n trivial like 'at." "Lissen," begins Joe, setting down his spoon. "Don' it strike you as...well, I mean, y' Ma wit'tem nickels an' lit'l slipsa papeh an' all, an'nen'nis Uncle Frank guy an'neese boys'a his tawkin' t't lanloehd an' all, an'nen....well... what I mean t'say is -- izzeah sump'n goin' on witcha fam'ly ya neveh tol' me about?" "Uncle Frank was like a fa't'eh to us," declares Sally, looking her husband straight in the eye. "A fa't'eh in ev'ry way." "Ah," ahs Joe. "Ah." He sips another spoonful of oatmeal. "Y'know, I kinda like t'is shade'a green." "Yeah," nods Sally. "It kin'a grows on ya, don'it?")

Funereal dirges played over the Berlin radio today, interspersed with bluntly pessimistic reports of German defeats on the Russian front, an newspaper headlines were interpreted as preparing the German people for an admission that the 22 German divisions trapped at Stalingrad are lost -- and that the situation elsewhere in Russia "is none too favorable" to the Nazi cause. Five days before the 10th anniversary of Adolf Hitler's rise to power, there are rumors that Hitler is preparing to deliver a speech to mark the occasion, in which he will blame German reverses on everything and everyone but himself. The Berlin newspaper Boersen-Zeitung declared "for the first time, the German people must face a defeat of some magnitute," while the Allegemeine Zeitung stated "everything in the German Reich is at stake, including the existence of every German." The official Nazi Party paper Volkischer-Beobachter noted that the Russian, British, and American people are now waging "total war," and demanded that the German people wage the same kind.

Meanwhile, a new wave of Nazi repression is sweeping over occupied Europe. The Berlin radio reports that in Marseilles, French Mediterranean port, 40,000 persons have been arrested and sent to concentration camps because "many state enemies, including many Jews" were reported active in that district. A thousand bars and cafes in the section were ordered closed. The broadcast report stated that only persons directly engaged in medical, railroad, or harbor work will be permitted to remain there, and declared that the German Army will demolish the entire quarter of the town, with the exception of archaeological and historical sites. "The false Apache romance of the harbor district," it was stated, "will be replaced by a cleaner quarter." German violence was also reported in Belgium, with the Belgian Government-In-Exile reporting the execution of 26 persons by the occupation government.

In Klamath, Oregon, police are holding a Marine as a material witness, as the investigation continues into the murder of a young woman aboard a Pullman sleeper early Saturday. Private Harold R. Wilson occupied Upper 13, the berth above the lower where an unknown killer slashed the throat of Mrs. Martha Virginia James and then fled the car. The Marine told police he was awakened by a scream coming from Lower 13, and when he peeked thru the curtains, he saw "a burly black-haired man in a brown pinstriped suit" hastening down the aisle. A search of the train revealed no such passenger, but a 29 year old dining car waiter, John Preston Funchess, the only man on board who possessed a pinstripe suit, is also being held as a material witness. No other passengers saw any pinstripe-suited, dark-haired man, but the two passengers in Upper and Lower 11, directly across the aisle, both reported hearing a scream "followed by an exclamation of horror and terror" indicating that Mrs. James knew she was not alone in her berth. Those two passengers, Eugene W. Norton of Daly City, California in Upper 11, and Marine Pvt. William Van Dyke in Lower 11, both told police they heard Mrs. James scream "My God! He's killing me!" Police say the train slowed down near the town of Tangent around the time the killing took place, which may have allowed the killer the opportunity to jump off. Pvt. Wilson denied any involvement in the killing, telling reporters "I am not implicated in this case in any way."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(1).jpg

(Sydney is very nice this time of year.)

Ten to fifteen thousand building owners in Brooklyn will lose their fuel oil rations after failing to convert their heating plants to coal or presenting satisfactory proof of their inability to do so. Kings County War Price and Rationing Board administrator George C. Tilyou warned that tomorrow is the deadline for users of 10,000 or more gallons annually to either complete the conversion process or to prove to the satisfaction of the board that they cannot.. The order effects virtually every building larger than a four-family dwelling. Owners of private homes have not yet been ordered to convert, although conversion to coal is "strongly recommended."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(2).jpg

(If you missed out on a stirrup pump for Christmas, Valentine's Day is coming!)

Stressing that he himself is a Jew, Magistrate Charles Solomon exercised leniency yesterday in the case of a 32-year-old man accused of anti-Semitism in connection with an assault case, but warned the prisoner that "Hitler would make no distinction between a Jewish Rabbi, a Catholic priest, or Pastor Niemoller." Ruling in Brooklyn Weekend Court, Magistrate Solomon paroled 32-year-old John Healy of Bay Ridge for a hearing in Special Sessions Court, and told Healy that "other magistrates who are not Jews would certainly hold you in bail." Healy was arraigned on third-degree assault charges on the complaint of Max Rubin of 7201 4th Avenue, who told police that Healy, while intoxicated, bumped into Mrs. Rubin while the Rubins were walking with their son near 73rd Street and 5th Avenue on Saturday night. When Mr. Rubin remonstrated Healy, it was charged that Healy replied "Hitler ought to send you back to Borough Park where you belong." Under questioning, Healy admitted to "having about 10 beers" before encountering the Rubins, but denied making the anti-Semitic remark.

Jack Benny will appear in person at the Times Square Paramount Theatre before tomorrow night's 6PM stage show to present Frank Sinatra with a trophy cup in recognition of his having been named the best singer of 1942 by a national magazine. Benny Goodman and his Orchestra will close out their run at the Paramount tomorrow night, due to prior obligations, but Sinatra is to continue on for a fifth week as star of the stage presentation accompanying the feature picture "Star Spangled Rhythm."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(3).jpg

("Bonds and Taxes, Bonds and Taxes, That's The Way to Beat the Axis!")

Funeral arrangements are being made for author, critic, and radio personality Alexander Woollcott, who died Saturday night at the age of 56, after being stricken with a heart attack during the weekly broadcast of "The People's Platform" over the CBS network. Mr. Woollcott had contributed uncharacteristically few remarks to a discussion on the program of Hitler's ten years in power, when he passed a note to the panelist seated next to him, Dr. Harry Gideonse, president of Brooklyn College, saying that he felt ill. He was taken to a Manhattan hospital and died several hours later. Mr. Woollcott, famous for his acerbic wit, was a prominent raconteur whose endorsement of a literary work was seen as a certain guarantee of its success. He had served as literary critic for the New York Herald Tribune, wrote many magazine articles, and numerous books, the most popular of which was an anthology of his essays entitled "While Rome Burns." He appeared for several years as radio's "Town Crier," and acted in several plays, including a turn as the character based on himself in "The Man Who Came To Dinner." Mr. Woollcott is to be cremated following non-denominational services, with his ashes to be interred at his birthplace of Phalanx, New Jersey or his summer home at Lake Bomoseen, Vermont.

Betting slips found in the ice cream cooler at a Brownsville candy store have led to bookmaking charges against the proprietor. Thirty-five-year-old Mrs. Minnie Perkel was behind the counter at the 77 Riverdale Avenue shop when Patrolman John McDonald saw several men hand her money and slips of paper. Searching the store, Patrolman McDonald found the slips, containing bets on horse races, in the ice box. Mrs. Perkel is being held on $500 bail pending a hearing in East New York Court later today.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(4).jpg

("Do you know what it means to be a Phil? We can't even make fun of the Browns!")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(5).jpg

(Some detective YOU are.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(6).jpg

(Hey Commissioner Valentine -- wanna know how to cut crime citywide by 75 percent? Fill in all basements!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(7).jpg

(This is the most toxic relationship I've ever seen in a comic strip. Worse than Willie and Mamie, worse than Harold and Lillums, worse than Punjab and "Daddy." HEY IRWIN, NO ONE CAN MAKE YOU FEEL INFERIOR WITHOUT YOUR CONSENT!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(8).jpg

(They're pretty quick with the gas chamber at 1943 dog pounds. Just sayin, Trix.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(10).jpg

(Hugh doesn't want to hurt your feelings, hon, but have you seen how he looks at that sportswriter?)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_.jpg

A whole lot of "ew" on just one page.

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(1).jpg

Sorry, Private Wilson, but your whole story absolutely reeks. A scream, a dead woman falls in the aisle, and only one passenger -- one and only one -- sees "a dark husky man emerge from Lower 13?" Lotta heavy sleepers on this car, I must say.

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(2).jpg

"What's this? That screwball Corkin would never write anything so bland as this. Something's up."

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(4).jpg

"All right you kids, line up so I can swear you in. NO TALKING IN THE RANKS."

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(5).jpg

"Yi!"

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(6).jpg

Either Mr. King hired a new letterer, or someone rewrote this entire strip. If so, I'd love to know what they really said.

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(7).jpg

Tilda doesn't know it, but she just hit the numbers. Combinated!

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(8).jpg

Awww, nice doggie with a sweater. DON'T LET HIM OUTSIDE.

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(9).jpg

"YOU HAD YOUR CHANCE FATHEAD!" screams Lana Lanigan.

Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(10).jpg

Nope, Irwin and Dan are still the most toxic.
 
Messages
16,045
Location
New York City
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_.jpg

("Well," sighs Joe, leaning back and basking in the waves of warmth beaming from the Loeser's heater, "it's good t'be home." "I'm not so soiten about t'is coleh he pain'ed t'kitchen," comments Sally. "I like green, but I dunno about *t'is* green." "Maybe y'should tell Uncle Frank," mutters Joe, sipping a spoonful of oatmeal. "Nah," replies Sally. "I would'n bot'eh him wit' sump'n trivial like 'at." "Lissen," begins Joe, setting down his spoon. "Don' it strike you as...well, I mean, y' Ma wit'tem nickels an' lit'l slipsa papeh an' all, an'nen'nis Uncle Frank guy an'neese boys'a his tawkin' t't lanloehd an' all, an'nen....well... what I mean t'say is -- izzeah sump'n goin' on witcha fam'ly ya neveh tol' me about?" "Uncle Frank was like a fa't'eh to us," declares Sally, looking her husband straight in the eye. "A fa't'eh in ev'ry way." "Ah," ahs Joe. "Ah." He sips another spoonful of oatmeal. "Y'know, I kinda like t'is shade'a green." "Yeah," nods Sally. "It kin'a grows on ya, don'it?")
...

Thefts related to gasoline, meat and sugar all on page one, plus a story about rationing of coffee. War really does change things.

Magistrate Solomon pushing back on LaGuardia's all out war on gambling is the genius of America's "checks and balances" government in action.

Hmm, I think the writer of Joe and Sally just neatly slipped one past the censors. Well done.


...

In Klamath, Oregon, police are holding a Marine as a material witness, as the investigation continues into the murder of a young woman aboard a Pullman sleeper early Saturday. Private Harold R. Wilson occupied Upper 13, the berth above the lower where an unknown killer slashed the throat of Mrs. Martha Virginia James and then fled the car. The Marine told police he was awakened by a scream coming from Lower 13, and when he peeked thru the curtains, he saw "a burly black-haired man in a brown pinstriped suit" hastening down the aisle. A search of the train revealed no such passenger, but a 29 year old dining car waiter, John Preston Funchess, the only man on board who possessed a pinstripe suit, is also being held as a material witness. No other passengers saw any pinstripe-suited, dark-haired man, but the two passengers in Upper and Lower 11, directly across the aisle, both reported hearing a scream "followed by an exclamation of horror and terror" indicating that Mrs. James knew she was not alone in her berth. Those two passengers, Eugene W. Norton of Daly City, California in Upper 11, and Marine Pvt. William Van Dyke in Lower 11, both told police they heard Mrs. James scream "My God! He's killing me!" Police say the train slowed down near the town of Tangent around the time the killing took place, which may have allowed the killer the opportunity to jump off. Pvt. Wilson denied any involvement in the killing, telling reporters "I am not implicated in this case in any way."
...

"Those two passengers, Eugene W. Norton of Daly City, California in Upper 11, and Marine Pvt. William Van Dyke in Lower 11, both told police they heard Mrs. James scream "My God! He's killing me!" Police say the train slowed down near the town of Tangent around the time the killing took place, which may have allowed the killer the opportunity to jump off."

Yet neither of you did anything? What was going through your minds, "I'm sure it's nothing, I'll just turn over and go back to sleep?" JHC


...

Betting slips found in the ice cream cooler at a Brownsville candy store have led to bookmaking charges against the proprietor. Thirty-five-year-old Mrs. Minnie Perkel was behind the counter at the 77 Riverdale Avenue shop when Patrolman John McDonald saw several men hand her money and slips of paper. Searching the store, Patrolman McDonald found the slips, containing bets on horse races, in the ice box. Mrs. Perkel is being held on $500 bail pending a hearing in East New York Court later today.
...

Ma Sweeney reads the article and slowly turns the page with a thoughtful, focussed mien.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(6).jpg


(Hey Commissioner Valentine -- wanna know how to cut crime citywide by 75 percent? Fill in all basements!)
...

"The vast majority of basements in America are used for law-abiding activities centered around wholesome family activities" - Basements 'r Us, Corporate Headquarters, Brooklyn, NY.


...
Daily_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(7).jpg


Tilda doesn't know it, but she just hit the numbers. Combinated!
...

"...can he support the old lady?!"

"...but I can't miss the chance of getting the old dragon off my hands."

Even big-hearted Bim has his limit.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One of the Regulars
Messages
281
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
Terrence is my comic but I am glancing across page, and a singular sparkle off these gemstones is script and sketch. Sketch to match prose and filler-now this Hugh and Lora, she is a looker. Drawn feminine perfect and demure, so why Hugh is reticent about all this is open conjecture. Miss Elizabeth's line queers the pitch, pun most definitely intended. Is this a gay lad cartoon? Quite advance bold ink then.

The Harold strip also. A bold lad who is sweet lady goggles masked. She is nicely drawn. At least Harold is using his opportunity wartime and all.

Now the stories are keen. The bride lost to murder inside her train berth is a tale grist for Poe or pulp.
 

PrivateEye

One of the Regulars
Messages
122
Location
Boston, MA
Sorry, Private Wilson, but your whole story absolutely reeks. A scream, a dead woman falls in the aisle, and only one passenger -- one and only one -- sees "a dark husky man emerge from Lower 13?" Lotta heavy sleepers on this car, I must say.
My thoughts exactly, except, if I read it correctly, two passengers saw him jump down from his bunk AFTER she rolled dead onto the floor?
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
On the other hand, though, nobody else saw the mystery man who was supposedly in the car long enough for Wilson to go "sprinting after him, " and I find that almost impossible to believe if the car was fully occupied, as presumably it would have been. We need a Daily News diagram of the car to show exactly how it was laid out, where everybody was, and how close they were to the exit.

A trip to our well-stocked Out Of Town Newsstand yields this coverage from the Klamath Falls paper. It'll be interesting to see how much of it makes its way to New York via the wire service tomorrow. I'd be surprised, though, if the Daily News isn't already sending a correspondent out to cover the story first hand.

Herald_and_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_.jpg
Herald_and_News_Mon__Jan_25__1943_(1).jpg

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_.jpg

("Coal Gas" - a mixture of methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide that's not only toxic but also explosive. It's a wonder the whole building didn't blow up. "Crown Street," notes Sally. "T'at ain' too far f'm Ma's house." "Ya Uncle Frank don' soivice 'at buildin', I hope," comments Joe. "What?" "Nut'n.")

President Roosevelt told American troops in Northern Ireland in a message today that "the road to Berlin is long and hard, but it is very sure. Major General Russell P. Hartle, who commanded the first American forces in the British Isles, read the President's message at ceremonies commemorating the first anniversary of the arrival of the first U. S. troops. Sir James Grigg, British War Secretary, told the American forces that "your stay here has been the best possible prelude not only to the active struggle against Germany and Japan and their jackals, but to even more difficult times when this struggle has been brought to a victorious end."

War Production Board chairman Donald L. Nelson today told a Senate subcomittee investigating the rubber situation that he and Rubber Director William M. Jeffers are "in disagreement" on the amount of rubber manufacturing plants that should be completed at this time. Jeffers charged yesterday before a meeting of the Council of State Governments in Baltimore that the war program is being compromised by "the so-called expediters -- the Army and Navy loafers" whom he accused of impeding his progress in setting up plants for the manufacture of synthetic rubber. Nelson told the rubber subcommittee that he disagrees with Jeffers' argument that there must be a push now to achieve 65 to 70 percent of the rubber program, and argued that an immediate goal of 55 percent of that quota would be reasonable while still allowing the achievement of other war needs. Nelson noted that the remaining portion of the rubber quota can still be met by the end of this year or by early 1944. The House and Senate Military Affairs Commitee will investigate Jeffers' assertions.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(1).jpg

("Can I have one of those boxing kangaroos? He might come in handy!")

In a new and devastating attack on Brooklyn's notorious Raymond Street Jail, Assemblyman Louis F. Friedman sought today to invoke the state's legislative power to force the closing of the prison and the removal of its inmates to facilities in Manhattan. The Brooklyn lawmaker, representing the Coney Island district, has sponsored a resolution which if adopted would result in legislative condemnation of the 65-year-old bastille, the transferral of its prisoners, and the demolition of the building, in preparation for the construction of a new, modern facility on the site after the war. Friedman's proposed resolution points to the Amen Report's conclusion that the jail has become "a dead storage warehouse for human beings," and outlines the dilapidation of the structure by emphasizing that one of its walls is now "visibly bulging," and constitutes a menace to the safety of the surrounding neighborhood as well as to the inmates and employees contained within.

Although there is as yet no official announcement of the exact date when point rationing of all canned and processed foods will begin, all indications are that it will happen on March 1st. A meeting of representatives of seventeen Office of Price Administration districts is now underway in Washington, where arrangements for the nationwide implementation of the program are being completed. Although the OPA has indicated that no official statement will be made "until the eleventh hour," it is expected that the official start of point rationing will be preceeded by a Government freeze order on the sale and shipment of canned and processed goods during the last week of February, with the rationing program to go into effect the following Monday, which is the first of March. The official date is being kept secret, according to OPA sources, in an effort to prevent last-minute hoarding of canned goods by food merchants who may be planning to "corner the market" on such merchandise in their neighborhoods.

Meanwhile, vegeterians are raising concerns about the impending rationing of canned fruits and vegetables, with the Vegetarian Society of New York having submitted a request to Food Administrator Claude E. WIckard for "a special dispensation" for non-meat eaters once the rationing program begins.

Pet owners are being reassured by the OPA that there is a sufficient supply of dog food available in New York City -- but that supply no longer includes beef. Horsemeat, frozen, canned and dehydrated, remains in good supply for canine consumers, as do foods made from processed cereals, but there is no longer any provision for dogs to feed on beef hearts, kidneys, liver, or other cheaper cuts that made up the bulk of their diets in prewar days.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(2).jpg

(I wonder why Preston Sturges never thought of making a gorilla movie?)

The Eagle Editorialist is deeply disturbed by the recent Court of Appeals decision setting aside the murder conviction of notorious underworld hoodlum Irving "Knadles" Nitzberg, who was freed, after two trials, on technical grounds due to a faulty indictment in one instance, and a technical defect in the manner in which Judge Peter Brancato charged the jury in the second. District Attorney Thomas Cradock Hughes now states that he sees no way to avoid turning Nitzberg loose, with the legal record now calling him "as blameless as a baby." Nitzberg, a member of the Murder for Money Gang, was convicted two years ago of killing fellow hoodlum Albert Shuman in 1939, and now Brooklyn can expect him to be on the streets again, an innocent man in the eyes of the law. The EE wonders why the faulty indictment could not have been discovered and corrected before the state went to the expense of a now-useless second trial.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(3).jpg

(C'mon, Lichty, I swear I saw this joke in the Readers' Digest.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(4).jpg

(At the Freddie Fitzsimmons Bowling Lanes on Empire Boulevard, our hero Fitz opens a telegram. "BETTER GET TO BED EARLY SON. LITTLE BOYS NEED THEIR REST. SEE YOU AT BEAR MOUNTAIN. OLD MAN COONEY.")

Dodger President Branch Rickey, and former Dodger coach Chuck Dressen, fired by RIckey after the 1942 season, will share the dais at a sports dinner to be hosted by the Columbus Council of the K of C this coming Thursday night. Rickey and Dressen will both, it is to be expected, have a great deal to say about the Dodgers' chances in 1943. Other speakers scheduled to appear include pitcher-coach Freddie Fitzsimmons, RIckey's personal assistant Edward Staples, radio broadcaster Don Dunphy, and Eagle columnist Harold Parrott. Servicemen stationed in the Brooklyn area have, in particular, been invited to attend the dinner.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(6).jpg

(Have you checked out any nightclubs?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(7).jpg

(But where do they store the coal?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(8).jpg

("I may not be DICK Tracy, but that doesn't mean I can't act like one!")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(9).jpg

("WHAT CRUST!" huffs George Bungle. "Listen, pal, let me tell you how to handle this...")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(10).jpg

("J. A. WOHL Bakery." Specializing in fine Pumpernickel?)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_.jpg

"Police finally discovered the two excited women had been aboard another train." Yes, this certainly sounds like a first-rate investigation.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(2).jpg

Ew.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(3).jpg

YOU'RE OUT OF UNIFORM KIDS. WHERE'S YOUR ARMBANDS! LOOK SHARP NOW! TENNNNNN-HUT!

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(4).jpg

C'mon, you guys. Never trust a man who smokes a cigarillo.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(5).jpg

"Yeah, I know." I love an articulate villain.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(6).jpg

If you're gonna run off with a strange Marine, at least don't take a train.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(7).jpg

And what's more Sarge is right now eating all your Christmas cookies.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(8).jpg

Never doubt that when he wants to be, Mr. Clark can be absolutely savage.

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(10).jpg

"PROCESSED CEREALS MY EYE!"

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(11).jpg

Never mind the old man, tell the draft board!
 
Messages
16,045
Location
New York City
...

In a new and devastating attack on Brooklyn's notorious Raymond Street Jail, Assemblyman Louis F. Friedman sought today to invoke the state's legislative power to force the closing of the prison and the removal of its inmates to facilities in Manhattan. The Brooklyn lawmaker, representing the Coney Island district, has sponsored a resolution which if adopted would result in legislative condemnation of the 65-year-old bastille, the transferral of its prisoners, and the demolition of the building, in preparation for the construction of a new, modern facility on the site after the war. Friedman's proposed resolution points to the Amen Report's conclusion that the jail has become "a dead storage warehouse for human beings," and outlines the dilapidation of the structure by emphasizing that one of its walls is now "visibly bulging," and constitutes a menace to the safety of the surrounding neighborhood as well as to the inmates and employees contained within.
...

Not word for word, but in spirit, you could substitute Rikers for Raymond Street in the above story and run it today as New York City has a similar jail issue on its hands in '23 as it had in '43.


...

Pet owners are being reassured by the OPA that there is a sufficient supply of dog food available in New York City -- but that supply no longer includes beef. Horsemeat, frozen, canned and dehydrated, remains in good supply for canine consumers, as do foods made from processed cereals, but there is no longer any provision for dogs to feed on beef hearts, kidneys, liver, or other cheaper cuts that made up the bulk of their diets in prewar days.
...

"As always, I'm happy to do my part for the war effort and will gladly eat whatever the OPA deems appropriate. It's not about me; it's about our boys."
354075-32377569fc0f2c618ba11c4ec4268395.jpg

"Then you won't mind if I turn in the three-hundred-plus cans of premium dog food you have stored in your basement?"
"Uh, umm, uh, I have no idea how those got there."
"Cans are funny like that, all one their own, they often walk into people's basements."
"I hate you."


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(7).jpg


(But where do they store the coal?)
...

Basements 'r Us regularly builds subbasements for coal and "other" storage for those who need their regular basement for, umm, other activities. We can't reveal the name, but we just finished building a subbasement for a pretty famous canine actor; it has a secret door and everything. He said something about needing extra storage.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(8).jpg


("I may not be DICK Tracy, but that doesn't mean I can't act like one!")
...

There's just a nastiness to this strip in general under the new writers. It's off-putting; it's become an unpleasant comicstrip to read.


And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_.jpg

"Police finally discovered the two excited women had been aboard another train." Yes, this certainly sounds like a first-rate investigation.
...

This crime is solvable if, to Lizzie's point, a professional investigation is conducted.

"I asked if she went to bed with a man without saying a word to him. She shrugged her shoulders, looked blank at me and said, 'Well, after all, it was Errol Flynn. What was there to say?'"


...
Daily_News_Tue__Jan_26__1943_(5).jpg


"Yeah, I know." I love an articulate villain.
...

In Prune Face's criminal world, Twenty got what he deserved.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One of the Regulars
Messages
281
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
David Niven was a Sandhurst alumnus and Flynn chum who endeavoured to defend Erroneous in his Hollywood memoir, its title eludes my recollection. This trial and later his later Second World War exemption. I cannot name any noteworthy films for Flynn done after the war. Yesterday's man. It might have been this and the dodge for capstone.
I believe Flynn passed at only fifty years. Seems to have gave John Barleycorn a race.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_.jpg

("Casablanca, huh?" comments Joe. "Guess we shouldn'a waited so long t'see t'at movie. Gonna hafta get cawght up." "Hmph," hmphs Sally. "T'ese publicity tieups! I ask ya!")

Six thousand men and women who had participated in a "stoppage" to enforce wage readjustments in the dress industry have gone back to work under a temporary agreement, it was announced this afternoon by Julius Hochman, general manager of the joint board of the Dress Makers Union of the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union. The back-to-work agreement leaves 26,000 workers still idle. The agreement, stated Mr. Hochman, was signed by 16 jobbers and manufacturers operating 110 shops in which the 6000 are employed. It provides for a 15 percent wage increase in pay to be deposited with the union, subject to final settlement of the dispute. The stoppage, which union officials have emphasized is not a formal strike, was precipitated in a breakdown of negotiations between the union and employers on Monday, with the union arguing that sharp increases in the cost of living make the pay increase imperative and the employers arguing that such an increase would violate the terms of the present IGLWU contract, which does not expire until the end of 1944.

A spectacular fire on Riverside Drive in Manhattan this morning turned an apartment building into a blazing torch visible for miles, causing one death, injuring seven persons, and driving 200 tenants into the cold winter morning in their night clothes. Firemen found residents jammed on a fire escape of the six story building at 552 Riverside Drive, and moments after they relieved that congestion with rescue ladders, flames exploded from the upper windows, engulfing the fire escape. The body of 55-year-old Edward Greer, a newspaper printer, was found in his bed. Flames had swept thru his apartment without touching his body, and it is believed he died of smoke inhalation. Another tenant in the building, concert violinist Carrol Glenn, escaped from her blazing apartment with a $30,000 violin under one arm and her dog under the other, and climbed safely down a snow-covered fire escape in a nightgown and bare feet. Miss Glenn told firemen she left behind a concert gown she was to wear during a performance with the Cleveland Symphony tomorrow night, along with her train fare to Cleveland -- but stressed that she will not cancel the performance.

The State Senate today adopted a resolution inviting Captain Edward V. Rickenbacker to appear before the full Legislature next month. The resolution, introduced by Senator Edward Coughlin, himself a World War I veteran, received unanimous approval in the Senate, and goes now to the House for a final vote. The joint legislative session is scheduled for Washington's Birthday.

New Do's and Don'ts for holders of A cards were issued today by a regional director of the Office of Price Administration, as police continue the hunt for 40,471 gasoline ration books stolen from the OPA office at Long Island City, and for the thieves who took them. OPA official E. J. Ferguson released official prohibitions on the use of gasoline to transport infirm persons to theatres or social visitations to relatives, taking children to music or dancing lessons, driving anyone to any amusement, theatre, social, or sports events even if said event is being held for charitable purposes, or driving to church, school, or fraternal auxiliary meetings. Driving is expressly permitted for transportation to one's occupation, for the delivery of clothing, food, or medicine to indigent persons, for transportation to Red Cross workrooms or war agency meetings, for transportation in the capacity of a member of a rationing or draft board, or to take a car to a garage for tire inspection, for repairs, or to place it in dead storage for the duration. If there are no trolleys or subways available, it is acceptable to drive to a restaurant, but only if you have to eat there as part of a business or organizational meeting -- and only if attendance at that meeting is compulsory. You may also drive to attend a wedding ceremony or a funeral service, and for shopping if the bundles you will be transporting are too large to fit aboard a public conveyance.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(2).jpg

(Butch says "I will, as soon as I can get gas for the trucks!")

Wendell Willkie expressed the opinion today that the first reports emerging from the Casablanca conference between President Roosevelt and Prime MInister Churchill are "disappointing," citing particularly the absence from the meeting of Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin and Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek. The 1940 Republican presidential candidate who served last year as an unofficial envoy of the President in a tour of Allied capitals, stated in a radio broadcast that he would like to see the establishment of a board of grand military strategy in which Russia and China are given an equal voice with the United States and Britain. Mr. Willkie also called for a united Allied solution to the "tangled and ugly problems of North Africa," expressing the hope that the conference saw "French collaborators reduced in status and that the men who risked their lives for freedom have at last come into their own."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(3).jpg

("Now it can be told!" The veils of secrecy are ripped away to reveal the confidential negotiations that will shape our coming victory in...whoa, the Adrian Rollini Trio? I hope there's room on the trolley!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(4).jpg

(War Is Heck.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(5).jpg

(And the other shoe, as expected, drops. Third base? I wonder what Jersey Joe Stripp is up to now?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(6).jpg

(Nah, it couldn't be...)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(7).jpg

(Mr. Stamm has been going thru Chester Gould's wastebasket.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(8).jpg

(Well, at least he'll lay off Irwin for a while.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(9).jpg

(SEE FOLKS! EVEN IN THE MIDDLE OF A TIGHT AND SUSPENSEFUL PLOT WE STILL HAVE TIME TO HELP A WORTHY CAUSE! LOOK FOR ME APPEARING WITH EDDIE CANTOR AT THE PRESIDENT'S BIRTHDAY BENEFIT!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(10).jpg

("Enny vay, mein boy, der lunch is rrrready mit der Liberty Cabbage...")
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,507
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_.jpg

That's right, Freddie -- stick to the script and everything will be just fine.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(1).jpg

Or ambidextrous.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(2).jpg

"What's this I hear about you taking hot ration stamps?"

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(3).jpg

And he still doesn't know what happened to his dog.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(4).jpg

And he's got plenty of stomach to get thru.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(5).jpg

Mr. Clark is really on a DONT YOU KNOW THERES A WAR ON kick.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(6).jpg

"No cookies though. You said you were going to send cookies. Did you forget?"

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(7).jpg

"Hey that's pretty good. Now draw a donkey!"

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(8).jpg

Gotta keep in practice or you'll lose your edge.

Daily_News_Wed__Jan_27__1943_(9).jpg

You know, you only get to keep that II-B classification if you're actually *working.*
 

Forum statistics

Threads
102,922
Messages
2,921,307
Members
49,848
Latest member
Komander
Top