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The Era -- Day By Day

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@LizzieMaine
"Boro, Long Island"

Long Island, NY ? But Boro is not a town?
That's headline language -- "boro" is simplified spelling for "Borough," which when the Eagle uses it, always refers to the Borough of Brooklyn, while "Long Island" means Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk Counties. All of these entitites are actually part of Long Island the geographic feature, but the civic distinctions mean much when it comes to the people who live there. There is, after all, Brooklyn, and then there's The Rest Of The World.

I've lived in this area almost my entire life and still get confused about what exactly "Long Island" is as it should not appear in addresses, but if often does. Long way of saying, I feel your pain @Trenchfriend.

My sixth grade grammar teacher would say the word is an example of a "synecdoche," which only adds to the confusion.
 
Messages
11,174
Location
Germany
I've lived in this area almost my entire life and still get confused about what exactly "Long Island" is as it should not appear in addresses, but if often does. Long way of saying, I feel your pain @Trenchfriend.

My sixth grade grammar teacher would say the word is an example of a "synecdoche," which only adds to the confusion.

At least, we had the five districts of NYC teached correctly in Geography in middle school. Our teacher told us especially, that it's "STATEN ISLAND", not "Rhode Island" or any other crap.
 

LizzieMaine

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My guess with FDR and Flynn is that the President is all too aware that while Tammany may be down, it still isn't out, and in the end, everything comes down to votes. It's the same reason he has to dicker with the good ol' boys from the Hookworm Belt, even though he finds them personally odious. The only politician in 1943 who seems to have mastered working outside the party system is Butch, and that's strictly because of the fusion arrangements allowed under the NYC electoral setup. Even he couldn't survive on a national scale without doing obeisance to party grandees. And as we've seen, the Democratic Party in 1943 is as factionalized as it's ever been.

It's a pity that Samuel Leibowitz is a judge now, because he would've been on his way out to take Mr. Folkes' case before they had a chance to do whatever they did. I doubt he's got much going for him in the way of legal counsel.
 

LizzieMaine

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At least, we had the five districts of NYC teached correctly in Geography in middle school. Our teacher told us especially, that it's "STATEN ISLAND", not "Rhode Island" or any other crap.
Even there, though, it's common to identify locations by section rather than by borough -- my ex-in-laws were from Tottenville, Staten Island, not Staten Island, NY.
 

LizzieMaine

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Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_.jpg

("'No, weah not woikin' f'LaGuardieh, weah simply woikin' f'humanity,'" reads Joe. "Boy, t'at Uncle Frank gets aroun'." "Awr you implicatin' sum'p'n?" scowls Sally. "Well, nah, onna ot'eh han', I mean, it could be somebody else," hedges Joe. "Maybe downtown ain' his territawry." "Uncle Frank has plenny t'keep busy wit' in Eas' Flatbush," returns Sally. "He jus' come oveh heeah t'do a faveh f'' Ma. Mos'ta time, he's busy woikin' on foinaces, raisin' money f't' pooeh anna owrph'ns, gettin' t'get'eh blood donations, c'lectin' scrap met'l, an' allat." "Pickin' up nickels," mutters Joe. "What?" "Nut'n.")

The old-fashioned pot-bellied coal stove is being promoted by the Office of Price Administration as a method of supplementary heating for homes not yet otherwise converted to coal heat, with OPA regional stove representative Robert A. Graves advising a meeting of hardware distributors at the OPA's Empire State Building offices that the agency will grant purchase authorization for such stoves to "almost anyone whose home will permit" the installation of such a heater. Heretofore, the OPA has required the purchasers of coal stoves to turn in a certain number of oil coupons as a condition of purchase, but the amendment does away with that specific requirement and instead asks stove buyers to turn in whatever number of coupons reflects the savings in oil they realize from the use of supplementary coal heating. Graves then urged the hardware wholesalers to "stock up" on coal stoves, furnishing the names of 64 manufacturers who have been authorized by the War Production Board to resume production of the stoves due to the oil crisis.

Meanwhile, Petroleum Administrator Harold A. Ickes warned from Washington today that the next six weeks will prove a "very critical period" in the seventeen-state Eastern fuel sector. He noted that present heating oil stocks are "close to the minimum working level," and that deliveries during the week ending January 23rd were "neither better nor worse" than expected. A statement from OPA regional rationing executive E. S. Ferguson that there is sufficient heating oil now available to redeem every outstanding fuel coupon in the East was seen as "cold comfort" by many consumers, especially when Mr. Ferguson immediately qualified his statement by indicating that he was speaking only "techically." Oil company executives pointed out that at least another 6,000,000 barrels are needed to permit full distribution of stock to Eastern consumers.

Police of the Ralph Avenue precinct today kept a constant vigil at Congregation Ahavath Israel, 712 Quincy Street, with Rabbi Maurice L. Idell expressing his satisfaction at the level of security being provided. "Everything is under control," declared the rabbi, noting that every time he goes to the synagogue now, he finds it guarded by a patrolman, and twice in the past week a radio car has been parked outside. Rabbi Idell thanked Captain Frank W. Young of the precinct for the "protection and interest you have taken in the place." Captain Young replied by promising the rabbi that "we will provide the moral assistance necessary to prevent" future acts of vandalism such as those last week, in which the temple was desecrated with swastikas. The decision to post a guard at the temple was a reversal of Captain Young's previous public statement on the case, in which he had declined to provide such protection, declaring "I'll take my chances."

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(1).jpg

(Most of these "doubtful Democrats," are hardened anti-New Deal figures, who would vote that the sky is brown if Mr. Roosevelt called it blue. Mr. Flynn might as well unpack.)

Today marks the beginning of a special week-long school vacation for city pupils, with all 850 public schools ordered closed by the Board of Education as a measure to save fuel oil. The Board of Education administrative offices at 110 Livingston Street will be open this week, but all other facilities under the Board's control are to be shut down. The Livingston Street offices will be available for staff members from individual schools who have clerical work to do. Brooklyn College will extend its mid-winter break, which was to end on February 8th, for another week, with that week to be made up at the end of the spring term, moving from June 9th instead of June 2nd. Queens College, which has converted a third of its heating units to coal, and was to open its spring term next Friday, will move that opening ahead to February 8th.

The Eagle Editorialist deplores the current trend for naming New Jersey shops that deal in horsemeat after famous race horses. "To a horse lover," he notes, "calling one of these markets 'Whirlaway' and another 'Man 'o War' goes against the grain. "Anyone who has seen these great horses in action -- or, in fact, any thoroughbred -- must rebel at the thought of connecting such splendid animals with a hamburger sandwich."

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(2).jpg

(Are you sure it's kids? Maybe it's cops trying to freeze out Prune Face.)

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(3).jpg

(Mr. Lichty hasn't visited my neighborhood in a while. That fence blew down two years ago.)

The city's celebration of President Roosevelt's birthday kicks off today with Mayor LaGuardia lighting the candles atop a red, white, and blue birthday cake in a ceremony to be held in the City Council chamber at City Hall. The cake ceremony kicks off an evening of festivities which will converge at the Waldorf Astoria this evening for a gala party to raise funds for the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, with stars of stage, screen, and radio scheduled to appear along with a dozen dance bands. Eight night club revues will be presented, along with a delegation of clowns from the Ringling Bros.-Barnum & Bailey Circus.

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(4).jpg

(Bill Zuber?? It is a sign of the times that a man whose nickname is "Goober" will be allowed to don the dignified pinstripes.)

Accomplished actress of the screen and stage Miss Lillian Gish will appear tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock at the Brooklyn Academy of Music to deliver a lecture on the topic "Hollywood and Broadway."

Radio stars headline the cast in Sidney Kingsley's new play on the life of Thomas Jefferson, "The Patriots," now playing at the National Theatre. Raymond Edward Johnson, known for his work with Arch Oboler as well as his role as the evil-voiced host of the Inner Sanctum program, performs the role of Jefferson with quiet distinction, while House Jameson, known to millions of radio listeners as Henry Aldrich's long-suffering father, makes a sharp and dynamic Alexander Hamilton. Peg LaCentra, prominent as a radio songstress, is Mrs. Hamilton, with veteran film star Madge Evans rounding out the cast as both Mr. Jefferson's wife and his daughter.

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(5).jpg

(Wait'll she gets just a little bit closer and then ZAM! A SWIFT KICK TO THE MIDRIFF! It's your only chance!)

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(6).jpg

(WELL YOU DON'T SAY!)

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(Irwin did try to kiss the Blarney Stone, but it slapped his face.)

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(I don't know if a lawyer can do anything, but Mr. Green definitely needs to see a doctor about his thyroid.)

Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(9).jpg

(Actually, it's Mrs. VON Gabble, but she doesn't want you to know that!)
 

LizzieMaine

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And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(1).jpg

"Say, Professor," remarks a man in an overcoat as C. H. Cleminshaw waits to take the stand. "That's a pretty nice lens in your telescope out there at Griffith Park. Mr. Warner wanted me to tell you he thinks it would be a shame if anything happened to it."

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(2).jpg

One third of nothing is still nothing.

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(3).jpg

He's gone into the other room to take off his disguise. The robe is getting smelly.

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(5).jpg

"Hmm, what's all these cans of peas an' cling peaches an' coffee doin' in here? And do I smell steak?"

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(6).jpg

"Summons for you, Tracy. It's from the OPA."

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Nina's good at math.

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Tsk, Bim. You said the same thing about Mr. Jay Golden Fleecer in 1937.

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(9).jpg

("Sorry Ma, we gotta study our Junior Commandos lessons.")

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(10).jpg

Never loan books or hats.

Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(11).jpg

How can you work in overalls that fit like that? Doesn't it chafe?
 
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16,177
Location
New York City
...

Police of the Ralph Avenue precinct today kept a constant vigil at Congregation Ahavath Israel, 712 Quincy Street, with Rabbi Maurice L. Idell expressing his satisfaction at the level of security being provided. "Everything is under control," declared the rabbi, noting that every time he goes to the synagogue now, he finds it guarded by a patrolman, and twice in the past week a radio car has been parked outside. Rabbi Idell thanked Captain Frank W. Young of the precinct for the "protection and interest you have taken in the place." Captain Young replied by promising the rabbi that "we will provide the moral assistance necessary to prevent" future acts of vandalism such as those last week, in which the temple was desecrated with swastikas. The decision to post a guard at the temple was a reversal of Captain Young's previous public statement on the case, in which he had declined to provide such protection, declaring "I'll take my chances."
...

Sadly, this is periodically still necessary today as I see cops stationed outside synagogues for weeks on end sometimes.


...
Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(1).jpg


(Most of these "doubtful Democrats," are hardened anti-New Deal figures, who would vote that the sky is brown if Mr. Roosevelt called it blue. Mr. Flynn might as well unpack.)
...

Since Flynn belongs in jail (where you or I would be if we had done what he did), I won't lose too much sleep if he loses his confirmation vote for inside political reasons, since those are the exact same thing that saved him from going to jail in the first place.


...

The Eagle Editorialist deplores the current trend for naming New Jersey shops that deal in horsemeat after famous race horses. "To a horse lover," he notes, "calling one of these markets 'Whirlaway' and another 'Man 'o War' goes against the grain. "Anyone who has seen these great horses in action -- or, in fact, any thoroughbred -- must rebel at the thought of connecting such splendid animals with a hamburger sandwich."
...

Again, I'm really surprised the owners of the horses aren't taking legal action.


...
Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(6)-2.jpg


(WELL YOU DON'T SAY!)
...

Of course the games are rigged, but then the entire gambling parlor is illegal, so what exactly is Scarlett trying to prove? Would it be okay of the games weren't rigged even though the establishment itself was still illegal? It's going to be a tough performance review for her this quarter.


...
Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(2).jpg



One third of nothing is still nothing.
...

It will probably be less than zero after the legal fees. This is spite at work.


Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(8).jpg

Tsk, Bim. You said the same thing about Mr. Jay Golden Fleecer in 1937.
...

Bim old man think this through. If Boffington is a fraud (which is quite likely), then the old lady is going to land right back in your lap and it will probably cost you a bunch of money to unwind whatever mess she got into. Check Boffington out now; it will be cheaper and make for less of a headache in the long run.


I've taken keener interest with Hugh and Harold. Terrence is a sip of tepid tea.

Agreed, Caniff has dragged this storyline out for too long.


Oh, and...
Daily_News_Sat__Jan_30__1943_(4).jpg


"Although do you remember how old Baldy squealed when he saw my bones in that tunnel? Heh, that was fun."

Yup.
 
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16,177
Location
New York City
Yes, I try to avoid looking things up as well...made the end of the baseball season much more entertaining.

I was as into the 1942's baseball season as I was into 2022's for just that reason.

As to the news, it's a different experience when you let it unfold over days or weeks or longer, just as it did when it was current. I think you get closer to understanding how it felt to someone living back then versus reading it as one complete story in a history book or on Wikipedia.
 

LizzieMaine

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There are moments when you realize there are mysterious forces at work in the doings of humanity operating on levels we cannot begin to comprehend. There was a moment, a microsecond, as Hugh Casey released that ball when those forces came into play and changed the course of history.

The same thing happened the day before, when Freddie Fitzsimmons, the best fielding pitcher the National League had ever known, landed in precisely the spot where his kneecap would intersect with Marius Russo's line drive. Had he come down an inch to the right or left of that specific point in space, the Dodgers would have won that game, Hugh Casey wouldn't have had to come and get rattled, and he wouldn't have still been rattled a day later when throwing the third strike to Henrich. And for that matter, had Fitz not been hit in the knee and been physically fit to pitch in 1942, he would have won at least one or two games that were otherwise lost, and the Dodgers would have won the pennant in 1942.

Forces beyond human comprehension. Sometimes it's better not to think too hard. Otherwise, like Pete Reiser hitting that wall in St. Louis, you crash into the boundaries of your own perceptions.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

A-List Customer
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There are moments when you realize there are mysterious forces at work in the doings of humanity operating on levels we cannot begin to comprehend. There was a moment, a microsecond, as Hugh Casey released that ball when those forces came into play and changed the course of history.
Forces beyond human comprehension. Sometimes it's better not to think too hard. Otherwise, like Pete Reiser hitting that wall in St. Louis, you crash into the boundaries of your own perceptions.
Sterling's slide down to the dollar floor, broker calls for added margin, Gilts dumped for cash, FTX's deliberate killing,
and, of course, Federal Reserve inflationary export. A truly wicked wicket googely all round.
 

LizzieMaine

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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_.jpg

("I wondehed about'at meat ya Ma give us when we was oveh t'eah," comments Joe. "I guess now I kn..." "Whatcha mean?" interrupts Sally. "I c'n tell ya 'zackly 'bout t'at meat. It's hawrsmeat." "Hawrsmeat?" gulps Joe. "Soitn'ly," replies Sally. "We wen' oveh t'Newehk onna bus one day while you was sleepin'. Wen'na t'at 'Man 'a Wawr" jernt an' picked out s'm steaks." "I ate HAWRSMEAT?" Joe repeats, the color draining from his face. "Yeah, ya did. An' ya said 't'is is t'swelles' steak I had in yeeahs,' if I recall c'reckly. Now, what was you implyin' about Ma?" "What kin'a hawrs was it?" stammers Joe. "I dunno," shrugs Sally. "T'ey didn' have nametags on'm a' nut'n. Prob'ly some ol' milk wagon hawrs a'sump'n." "Oh," sighs Joe. "Whassamatteh?" asks Sally. "T'eah's a wawr on, y'know. If ya gotta eat a hawrs, y'can't be too p'ticuleh 'bout what kin'a hawrs it is. Y'can't go askin' f'innehductions." "I s'pose," Joe concludes. "I just wouldn' wanna eat a hawrs I mighta, you know, bet on..." "What?" "Nut'n.")

The British 8th Army has crashed into Tunisia, it was announced last night. Dispatches from Madrid reported that American forces are also driving toward the coast from the west, with the gap between Allied armies now narrowed to less than 150 miles. As the advances continued, the Allies stepped up their relentless attacks on Axis supply facilitiies on the Mediterranean coast, with communiques reporting that American planes blasted seven ships, including two large cargo liners, in attacks on Tunisia-bound convoys. New raids were also made on the Bizerte and Tunis airdromes.

An Army sergeant from Brooklyn who from a Corregidor telegraph key tapped out the last poignant messages before the island fortress fell to the Japanese last spring has been reported alive in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. Twenty-two year old radio operator Irving Strobing, of 605 Barbey Street in East New York was last heard from on May 5th, when his final message describing the last hour of shelling as "too much for the boys to take" was received. Since then nothing was heard from the young sergeant, but yesterday his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Strobing, received official notification from the Army that their son is alive. "I could feel that he is alive," declared Mrs. Strobing. "Call it a mother's intuitiion."

In Hollywood, the sister-in-law of comedian Bob Hope charged yesterday that he "doesn't even see his fan mail," and that the gags he pulls on the air "are pulled from file cabinets containing hundreds of stale ones." Marie Towns Hope made the assertions in testimony in a lawsuit filed against her brother-in-law in an effort to receive a pay raise, charging that the comedian pays her $12.50 a week to go over his fan mail and catalog jokes for his files, "some of them terrible." She further asserted that her husband Jim, not the comedian himself, signs all the autographs Hope sends out to admirers. Hope responded that it is nobody's business what he does with his fan mail, and called his sister-in-law "anything but underpaid" for the work she does. Mrs. Hope is seeking payment of $2300 for the past two years, but Hope countercharged that she still owes him for a loan of $1425 she never paid back.

A postal clerk turned hero yesterday when he rushed into a burning house in Prospect Heights to rescue a woman and her child from the flames. Aaron Margolin of 2406 65th Street was on duty at Post Office Station V, when he heard a commotion from the house at 29 8th Street, two doors away. Rushing outside, he saw smoke pouring out of the house, ran up the front stoop, kicked in the door, and found Mrs. Alma Dernbach and her three-year-old daughter Joan choking from the smoke. Margolin took them by the hand and led them to safety. Firemen arrived on the scene in time to rescue two other Dernbach children, sons Frederick, age 6, and Henry, age 8, along with a boarder, Mrs. Josephine Koansogoz. The fire is said to have begun in a basement pantry, and destroyed the basement and the parlor floor of the house, with extensive smoke damage to the top floor.

Motorists lined up thru tne night at the State Motor Vehicle Bureau office, at 320 Schermerhorn Street, to receive their 1943 license-plate validation strips, which must be affixed to their existing 1942 license plates no later than midnight Monday. The yellow-colored validation strips stamped "NY 43" are being issued this year in lieu of new license plates due to the metal shortage, and are to be bolted to the top of the 1942 plates to cover the "NY 42" inscription.

The new midwinter edition of the Brooklyn Telephone Directory is now available, listing a total of 314,500 subscribers in its 714 pages, an increase of 7000 listings over the previous edition. The Brooklyn Classifed directory, lists 83,000 business subscribers, under 1700 classifications, in its 516 pages. Copies of the two directories will be distributed by carriers over the next nine days, with old directories to be surrendered upon receipt of the new.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(1).jpg

(And if you can't afford a Lilly Dache work hat, a ten-cent headrag from Woolworth's will do just as well.)

The Eagle Editorialist notes the tenth anniversary of Adolf Hitler's rise to power "brings the promise of the end of a tragic era." "More than any one man in modern times," the EE declares, "Adolf Hitler has labored to effect a reversion to barbarism, attacking ruthlessly the principles of Christianity, the customs of civilization, the foundations of culture, and the ordinary amenities of decent behavior among men." After reviewing Hitler's success over the past ten years in causing the European continent to "run with tears and blood," the EE predicts that at this anniversary "a few ghosts may intrude upon his contemplative moods," and predicts that "after his decade of power and glory, Hitler will soon be alone. When it becomes clear to the hatchetmen who make up his choice company that the Fuehrer's day is done, they will scurry to save their skins, leaving their old master to face the bleak future without a friend at his side. Now, after 10 years of horror, Hitler's enemies are closing in on him," and his end "is only a matter of time."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(2).jpg

(Yes, Tommy, we remember Game Four all too well. Good luck to Hughie in the Navy. At least he won't have to throw any grenades.)

Thirty-seven-year-old Lloyd "Little Poison" Waner has announced his retirement from baseball, telling the Philadelphia Phils that he is closing out his long and distinguished career after sixteen seasons, mostly as a star outfielder next to his brother Paul, "Big Poison," with the Pittsburgh Pirates. Paul, who turns 40 in April, has signed as a free agent to play this coming season for the Dodgers following his release from the Boston Braves. Lloyd has not revealed his future plans.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(3).jpg

("He is a blown-in-the-bottle French politician, if that would be anything to brag about.")

Stripteaser Georgia Sothern, Gypsy Rose Lee's bosom pal and colleague in "Star and Garter," has issued a booklet of jokes and skits suitable for use in military camp shows, which may be had directly from her by mail to any member of the Armed Forces serving anywhere. The booklet includes Miss Sothern's most famous burlesque sketch, "A Handful of Nickels," along with suitable material for the man who serves as master-of-ceremonies, and enough musical and other material to put on a complete performance. Those wanting a free copy may write Miss Sothern direct care of the Music Box Theatre, New York City, or at 57 W. 45th Street, N. Y. C. Miss Sothern says she's already at work on a sequel, and anyone who'd like to send her material "that hasn't been kicked around by anyone else," is encouraged to do so.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(4).jpg

(Awwww. I love a heartwarming animal story.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(5).jpg

(Shaw's a piker. My winter coat is 82 years old.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(6).jpg

("DIS IS NICHT GOOT!" Well now, I wouldn't say that.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(7).jpg

(Shoulda bought 'em at Davega.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(8).jpg

("And if he doesn't work out, we can always have him for supper!" Oh, and Irwin -- "Give me a drag on that pipe dream when you're done with it?" Stop stealing from Bob Hope's filing cabinet.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(9).jpg

(Don't worry folks, I'm sure by now they've found all the unexploded bombs...)
 

LizzieMaine

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And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_.jpg

Of course the door's been tampered with. The question is, "by whom?"

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(2).jpg

"Dear Bob Hope, AND NOT BOB HOPE'S BROTHER..."

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That's IT? C'mon, Gould, we know you can do better than this. Remember Krome? Remember Little Face? Where's the swarm of bees???

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(4).jpg

"Goot Evening?" Don't they give these spies elocution lessons?

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(5).jpg

"A gas that destroys the brain! Gad, boy, that explains your poor father!"

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(6).jpg

HEY KIDS! SCIENCE!

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Fortunately, Walt is well-padded.

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If you think that's bad, wait'll you hear from Dagwood Bumstead's lawyers.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(9).jpg

I hate puzzle pages.

Daily_News_Sun__Jan_31__1943_(10).jpg

There's no place like home.
 

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