(Travel) Where to visit in England?

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by high-maintenance, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. high-maintenance

    high-maintenance One of the Regulars

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    174
    Hey guys

    I am visiting London next February for a week.
    Of course I'll be doing some shopping(Lewis, Eastman, shoes...), but I want to visit some cities outside London.

    I recently found out about this place called 'Fowey' in Cornwall which looks like a very nice place to visit. Has anyone visited Fowey? What's the place like?

    (I am not going to rent a car so my choice of transportation will be train and bus.)

    Awaiting some great suggestions from British fellas!

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
  2. Mich486

    Mich486 Practically Family

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    Oxford and Windsor are within close reach from London and come to mind before Fowey (which is pretty far and you might as well go to visit Scotland then opening up a whole lot of other opportunities) :)


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  3. high-maintenance

    high-maintenance One of the Regulars

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    Right! Scotland... So.. other than aeroleatherclothing HQ, where should I visit? (please note that I won't be driving a car!)
     
  4. Peter Bowden

    Peter Bowden Practically Family

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  5. high-maintenance

    high-maintenance One of the Regulars

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    Thanks Cambridge is like Harvard of UK right? Awesome
     
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  6. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    If it's just sightseeing that you would like to do, then as previously suggested, stay within easy travel of London. In London, take an open top bus tour. You can hop on hop off at your leisure. A good way of seeing what you want is to stay on the bus and note down the various sights you would like to see. You could also do a search before you leave home. Google something like: "Must see sights in London."

    Popular trips from London, meaning plentiful public transport, are Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare country. Stonehenge, just a pile of rocks, but built three thousand years ago, and with amazingly accurate geometry. Or if you want a bit of vibrant nightlife other than what London has to offer, head south to Brighton.

    When you are doing a search, try also something like, "Interesting places in UK," or "fascinating sights often missed by tourists." By doing a search you might come across something that appeals to you, chances are that someone on this side of the pond could answer any question that you have. Something I forgot, there's a suburb in London called Stratford, you occasionally see a foreigner wandering around looking for Shakespeare's house. Stratford, London, is where the 2012 olympics were held. Shakespeare's Stratford is in Warwickshire, and we pronounce that as Worrickshire.
     
  7. Peter Bowden

    Peter Bowden Practically Family

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    Yes, I think Oxford and Cambridge Universities would vie for the same comparison.
     
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  8. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    Heathrow and then straight down to the south of France.
     
  9. jacketjunkie

    jacketjunkie One Too Many

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    Durham is a very charming little city on the way up to Scotland. Studied there for a semester. It's where they shot most of the Harry Potter Outside of Castle scenes, too, incase you have seen those films.

    Incase you do make it to Scotland, the general rule is the farther you go north, the more beautiful the landscape becomes.
     
  10. Mich486

    Mich486 Practically Family

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    Edinburgh;)


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  11. galopede

    galopede One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Gloucester, England
    And talking of pronunciation, if you do go to Fowey in Cornwall, it's pronounce Foy!
     
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  12. high-maintenance

    high-maintenance One of the Regulars

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    Good to know
     
  13. high-maintenance

    high-maintenance One of the Regulars

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    Oh You DO NOT want to visit Paris. It literally is a sh**hole. Believe me. I'd rather visit Brussels instead!
     
  14. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    South of France. St. Tropez. No worries.
     
  15. Lord Flashheart

    Lord Flashheart A-List Customer

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    Go to Edinburgh,

    Train will pick you up from Kings Cross in London then drop you off at Waverley station Edinburgh which is pretty much walking distance to thousands of hotels in God’s own capital. Seriously tho, Edinburgh is a great city for the car-less as it’s very compact and most of the historic attractions are walking distance from each other.

    Regards

    Garry
     
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  16. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Another vote for Edinburgh, beautiful city! If you are there overnight the cheesy night ghost walks are fun.
     
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  17. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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  18. Steven65

    Steven65 New in Town

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    I was in the UK 6 weeks ago. I took the Caledonian Sleeper up to Edinburgh. Absolutely beautiful city and only an hours drive from Aero. There is a train that goes from Edinburgh station to Galashiels.
    Have fun!
     
  19. blissann

    blissann New in Town

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    I was in 2 times. Here’s what I saw:

    -The Tower
    -The science museum
    -The royal Observatory/prime meridian
    -Globe Theater
    -Camden Market
    -A play in the theatre district were you just get last minute tickets for cheap. Don’t remember what we saw so it must not have been good, lol.
    -That park where people can stand on soapboxes and give speeches about whatever they want.
    -a handful of restaurants that were trendy at the time. One had this amazing vegetarian bangers and mash that I still wish I could have again
    Overall, a lovely place with awesome atmosphere. More on travelsites
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
  20. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Location:
    London, UK
    Within England, Brighton, Lewes, Oxford and Cambridge are all worth considering. Of the latter two, I would be more inclined to choose Oxford as a true town dating way back into history. Oxford is a town which also happens to have an old university; Cambridge is a town which grew up around a university. Cambridge, although they don't like to acknowledge it, is really Oxford's daughter university, having been set up in (if memory serves) the 1400s when a bunch of academics and students at Oxford had had enough of being attacked by townies and struck out for new ground.

    Windsor is also an easy day-trip, with some nice sights to see. The High Street shops are a pleasant browse, and there is, of course, Windsor Castle - worth a visit even if, like me, you are an ardent non-royalist. A fifteen minute cab ride from the High Street will take you to Oakley Court Hotel - not cheap, but a better afternoon tea than the Ritz imo - https://www.oakleycourt.co.uk/eat-and-drink/afternoon-tea-2-2/ Only open as a hotel since the mid 90s, this building is rather more famous for its appearance in many films made by the (now sadly gone) nearby Bray Studios. It featured in many Hammer Horror pictures, as the school house in all the original Saint Trinians films, and is perhaps most famous for its appearance as Castle Franknfurter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The grounds are as beautiful as the original Victorian neo-gothic building itself. De Gaulle is believed to have stayed at Oakley court while in England during WW2, when it was still a private house.

    Stratford Upn Avon is an excellent choice too - do an overnight there, or at least time your trains so as to catch a matine show in the Royal Shakespeare Theatre.


    Edinburgh is a good place to start, being only four hours from London by direct train (overnight sleeper services to Edinburgh and Glasgow are available, but can be hellish expensive. For British trains in general, book as early as possible via www.thetrainline.com). The small Edinburgh museum is worth seeing, especially if you are interested in WW1 for the collection of General Haig's uniforms. The Royal Mile is worth a walk, ditto Grassmarkets (one of the Burke & Hare victims was murdered following a night in one of the pubs there). The blue Ocean Chippy on the Royal Mile will do you one of the finest battered haggis and chip suppers in Scotland. The Castle is worth a visit, obviously. I would also suggest a visit to the Holyrood Parliament in Edinburgh, a fascinating example of devolved government. Less historical than Westminster Palace, but more accessible. The SCott Monument is worth seeing - Princess Street in general is worth a dander for the gardens. A bustour - the hop on/off "Cityseeing" brand are very good - is worth a look. Some good ghost walks if you're interested in that sort of thing. Galashiels is an hour out of Edinburgh by train - allow at least half a day to go there, including a good couple of hours for an Aero factory visit. Phone ahead to be sure they're open that day. Try on everything you can in there!

    Glasgow, Scotland's "second city" (and main base of BBC Scotland) is an hour by train from Edinburgh, or five hours from London. It's arguable more 'Scottish' than Edinburgh; much less tartan-tourism kitsch. Still plenty to see, not least the Kelvingrove museum which has both a Spitfire and the original Dali painting "Christ of St John of the Cross". If you've never been to Scotland before, a long weekend in Edinburgh is a good place to start, then Glasgow. Elsewise, from London and depending on public transport, you're into longer trips to see Inverness (near Culloden Moor, site of the infamous battle) or Aberdeen (beautiful little oil and university town on the NE Coast), or Ayrshire on the West Coast. The Highlands are the most beautiful of all, but can be difficult to do without your own transport.

    Oxford and Cambridge - collectively known as "Oxbridge" - would vie for being the Harvard or Princeton of the UK (Caveat Emptor: because their brand is strong, there is much anecdotal evidence of their teaching not being all that). Then there's the Russell Group (including Queen's in Belfast and Queen Mary University of London) which would be the UK's Ivy League.

    Horses for courses, I guess: I love Paris. (Not quite as much as Berlin, but...). Paris' one true fault is it's prices - far from cheap. But anyone going to the South of France needn't worry about Paris. My top recomendation in the South is a quiet little town called Oleron Sainte Marie, beautiful little place to spend a few days totally relaxing and poking around in local restaurants. Also the home of LaulHere, France's oldest remaining beret maker. A trip to the factory shop is highly recommended.

    All good spots for the tourist. I would also suggest Portobello Road Market on a Friday, or preferably Saturday (better day for vintage clothes, especially around the Westway end).

    Shakespeare's Globe will be out of season for shows when you're here in February, but the museum will be open, as well as the Sam Wannamaker Theatre, the Globe's recreation of an indoor Elizabethan theatre.

    Much like anywhere else, a sightseeing bus tour is a good way to catch some of the major sityes nad get oriented. With time, a very pleasant afternoon can be spent getting the tube to Tower Hill and from there walking the Riverbank west to Westminster Palace, aka the Houses of Parliament.

    You can pick up half-price or better tickets on the day in Leicester Square; best is the original ticket booth on the South side of the Square. Get there for opening at 9am for best availability. Longest runninh shows like Phantom or The Mousetrap are easiest to get; there will be fewer, obviously, for new openings. If you're interested in opera, you can sometimes find seats in the slips at the very top of the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden (known among opera buffs as "the Garden") for five or ten pounds - much less than any West End musical.

    Speaker's Corner in Hyde Park.

    Most any pub that does food will do a half decent bangers and mash. My favourite restaurant in London is also its oldest - Rules, on Maiden Lane, Covent Garden area (Maiden Lane runs parrallel to the Strand; Rules is close to the stage door of the Adelphi Theatre). In business consistently since 1798, it specialises in very traditional English/British cookery, particularly game. The menu changes seasonally (we typically go every year for our anniversary in late August, so grouse will be on the menu), but it is always fantastic. Typically GBP150 or so for two if you aren't big drinkers. Not cheap, but well worth it for a special occasion. Now is as good a time as any to go too, given the historically strong dollar vs the pound. My other top tip in central London is Brasserie Zedel; I've bought dinner there for four people with three courses, drink and coffee for around £150, and there are set theatre menus - we've eaten there at under £50 for two. Beautiful place. French cuisine. My next favourite in London to Rules - https://www.brasseriezedel.com/ .

    Otherwise, standard big city caveats apply - be wary of any street vendor whose food cart is very mobile, and expect any eatery right bang on the main tourist drag to be much more expensive than a smaller place round the corner.

    If you like Chinese, Chinatown (above Leicester Square). For Curry, drift East - Tayabs http://www.tayyabs.co.uk/ for Pakistani and Punjabi style, Brick Lane for mostly Bangladeshi.

    If you like Walking tours, I have two recommendations. Firstly, anything by the Original London Walks company, especially their Jack the Ripper tour, written by top Ripperologist Donald Rumbelow. SEcondly, Russell Nash: https://www.guiderussell.co.uk/ Russell does take booking for large groups, but sometimes opens up his tours to the general public. They're all fantastic, but The Men Who Made Menswear would be of particular interest I suspect.
     
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