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Trench Coat - the 'Ultimate' Thread!

-Ariel-

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The english navy trench, 1994, there is word "regent" on the label inside the pocket, whatever it means.
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Doctor Damage

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Thank you, Doctor Damage - not sure how I missed that.
Although a quick search on e-bay UK doesn't turn up anything, my memory is tell me in the past I've seen overcoats and whatnot labelled Regent for sale. Perhaps it's a smaller regional brand or a brand name for a particular retailer? I've got three trenchcoats made by the same company from the same cloth but two are labelled for a local men's clothing store and the third something else. Anyways, I agree that Ariel's coat is very nice and fits him perfectly. He seems to have found a bottomless supply of these types of coats where he lives!
 

Kennyz

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Ohio
I searched ebay in the USA and a few "Austin Reed of Regent St" coats came up - but nothing like Ariel's. I'll have to keep checking from time to time. Thanks again for the info, Doctor Damage.
 

Doctor Damage

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I searched ebay in the USA and a few "Austin Reed of Regent St" coats came up - but nothing like Ariel's. I'll have to keep checking from time to time. Thanks again for the info, Doctor Damage.
If you're located in the US then do search for London Fog trench coats. There will be tons of them on ebay, many of them selling for the price of a tank of gas, and some will have proportions and details very similar to Ariel's coat. In fact, when I first saw his photos I thought "looks like an older London Fog".
 

Kennyz

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Ohio
That is a GREAT tip!!! Thank you, Doctor Damage. :)

Ken

If you're located in the US then do search for London Fog trench coats. There will be tons of them on ebay, many of them selling for the price of a tank of gas, and some will have proportions and details very similar to Ariel's coat. In fact, when I first saw his photos I thought "looks like an older London Fog".
 

GHT

I'll Lock Up
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8,551
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New Forest
The english navy trench, 1994, there is word "regent" on the label inside the pocket, whatever it means.
The "regent" on that label refers to London's Regent Street, a place that was once the epicentre of menswear. Jaeger were the first, and only company, to use Regent as a marketing name. Other famous companies that had an outlet in Regent Street were Aquascutum, Austin Reed & Jeremy Hackett.

A useful source of the Trench Coat, it's history and variations, can be found in The Gentleman's Gazette, see here: https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/trench-coat-guide/

A good place to search for that distinctive trench coat are at vintage festivals. I think that I might have posted this previously, but worth another showing. My wife found this on a stall at a 1940's event that we were at a few years ago. The coat is probably more 60's but even by then little had changed, the gun flap has gone and the epaulettes are sewn down but the general appearance remains. This particular coat has a zip in/out heavy lining, so wonderfully warming in the winter months.
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Doctor Damage

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I think that I might have posted this previously, but worth another showing.
Oh yes, I think you did post that one before. It's one of the US military officer's coats. By all accounts they're a solid bit of kit and because the design dates from WWII* they have a nice vintage vibe.

* I've seen photos of senior US generals wearing these coats in late WWII and then in the 1950s.
 

Kennyz

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Location
Ohio
Very useful information, GHT - thank you. By the way, you look really sharp in that trench coat!

Ken


The "regent" on that label refers to London's Regent Street, a place that was once the epicentre of menswear. Jaeger were the first, and only company, to use Regent as a marketing name. Other famous companies that had an outlet in Regent Street were Aquascutum, Austin Reed & Jeremy Hackett.

A useful source of the Trench Coat, it's history and variations, can be found in The Gentleman's Gazette, see here: https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/trench-coat-guide/

A good place to search for that distinctive trench coat are at vintage festivals. I think that I might have posted this previously, but worth another showing. My wife found this on a stall at a 1940's event that we were at a few years ago. The coat is probably more 60's but even by then little had changed, the gun flap has gone and the epaulettes are sewn down but the general appearance remains. This particular coat has a zip in/out heavy lining, so wonderfully warming in the winter months.
View attachment 218943
 

-Ariel-

Familiar Face
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58
Location
Russia
The "regent" on that label refers to London's Regent Street, a place that was once the epicentre of menswear. Jaeger were the first, and only company, to use Regent as a marketing name. Other famous companies that had an outlet in Regent Street were Aquascutum, Austin Reed & Jeremy Hackett.
View attachment 218943
Seems to be a pretty good trench i have got.
 
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Doctor Damage

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^ That publicity photo reminds me of a large photo showing Bogey in a trenchcoat which hung in the stairwell of Stollery's, a men's clothing store in Toronto (Ontario). I can't remember if it was that exact photo or a different one, but of course Bogey was often photographed in a trenchcoat. Stollery's was the Ontario retailer for Burberry and you went down their stairs into their basement where they had hundreds of coats on racks, all sizes and colours.
 

Edward

Bartender
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London, UK

Double stormflaps (commonly called gunflaps, but they had nothing to do with guns. These are desgined so the the top of the fold - over can be buttoned up underneath the flap in heavy rain, thus preventing the wet from getting in via the top), set-in (as opposed to the more common raglan) sleeves. Both details of Bogie's Casablanca coat. The length is also correct for Bogart, though I don't know whether that wasstock or if he had it altered. Being a shorter fellow, Bogart's Casablanca trenchcoat was reportedly cut shorter over the leg (sittingj ust on his knees) than was the norm in order to prevent a longer coat from emphasising his shortness. Not an unusual trick in tailoring; I've even heard it said that Hitler's SS had their uniforms deliberately tailored "too short" on the arms and in the body to make them look taller than they actually were, and emphasise the notion of theAryan Superman to enemy troops.

If you're located in the US then do search for London Fog trench coats. There will be tons of them on ebay, many of them selling for the price of a tank of gas, and some will have proportions and details very similar to Ariel's coat. In fact, when I first saw his photos I thought "looks like an older London Fog".

Another brand worth looking out for is Grenfell. Every bit as good as the best Burberry have to offer, but owing to not having the fashionability of the latter brand in recent years, vastly cheaper on the used market.

Oh yes, I think you did post that one before. It's one of the US military officer's coats. By all accounts they're a solid bit of kit and because the design dates from WWII* they have a nice vintage vibe.

* I've seen photos of senior US generals wearing these coats in late WWII and then in the 1950s.

There are similar models going back to the War period, though per previous discussion, this is an AG44 which was issued between 1961 and 1976. There were, of course, similar models in the ww2 and Korean period. I believe the most significant difference between the AG-44 and earlier models is the liner fastening - from memory, the AG44 always had a zip-liner. I have a feeling (but I don't know for usre, not handled enough of them ) that the liner may have swtiched from wool to quilted during its run, I'm sure I've seen both. Earlier coats were doubtless button-in liners.

I also believe the earlier coats were of a different colour; the AG-44's active issue period comes fully within the 1954-2015 period in which the US Army issued dark green uniforms, which repalced the old "pinks and greens". The coats worn in WW2 and Korea were a very similar design to the AG-44 externally, except in a much lighter, olive green colour:

a90f3211b45bac91ae5f81763dc5ffb3--green-trench-coat-trench-coats.jpg


Still a great design if, out of context of the rest of the uniform, more obviously military than the AG-44.

Quite a few Eastern European and Soviet forces also to this day have coats similar to these, I suspect because they are more cheaply produced (and can be worn at least a season longer) than a heavy wool overcoat. The right ones can make excellent civilian coats. I briefly handled a current production one from Italy in a greyish tan which was very nice indeed, but had to be returned as too small for me.
 
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