Vintage airplanes

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by /|\, Sep 25, 2011.

  1. /|\

    /|\ One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Birch Bay
    I saw this nice '50s-vintage Cessna 170 at a fly-in a couple of months ago. Absolutely beautiful!

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    There was also a 1968 Cessna 172K there that had been restored.

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    I got a snap of the cockpit.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Heather

    Heather Practically Family

    Messages:
    657
    Location:
    Southern Maine, USA
    Planes like these make me really want to learn how to fly!
     
  3. /|\

    /|\ One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Birch Bay
    Then do! :)

    Flying ain't cheap -- as I found out when I was laid off and had a new mortgage -- but it can be affordable. You'll need a private pilot certificate to fly the planes in the OP, but if you don't mind newer aircraft you can get a Recreational or Sport license. And you don't have to pay for it all at once. Some people say they're 'too old'. Nonsense! As long as you can pass the physical, you should be good! I just read about a 77-year-old who just got his license, and there's a club for people still flying in their 90s.

    But back to vintage airplanes. This is what I think about when I see them, especially ones like the 170 and others from that era: Fewer regulations, more wide-open spaces. Flying over the desert Southwest, landing on a dirt road to visit a friend. Pachno Barnes and her Happy Bottom Riding Club, where aviation ruled. A sense of adventure where you could take off without all of the radio chatter. Khaki trousers and red plaid shirts, with a fedora as you flew out to a remote cabin. Time. Granted, a new airplane in the four-seat, 150 hp class is no speed demon; but I think flying was more leisurely in the days before I was born. The Space Age. In the early-'60s a lot of planes were still delivered with unpainted surfaces. The 1960 Cessna 172 got a swept tail. Piper Cherokees were the Sleek New Things. Celebrities hopping into a Bonanza or a Comanche (sometimes with disastrous results -- Richie Valens and Patsy Cline, for example) instead of hanging out in an airport lounge and then boarding a jumbo jet to sit in their First Class seats.
     
  4. Talbot

    Talbot One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,842
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Beautifull:eusa_clap:eusa_clap
     
  5. LoveMyHats2

    LoveMyHats2 I’ll Lock Up.

    Messages:
    5,196
    Location:
    Michigan
    Who ever owns that plane keeps it clean beyond anything I have seen in a long time!

    Flying is so much fun, it is hard to describe.

    I do not own a plane, but do fly. My first solo was a bit nerve bending but was well worth it. Some planes are as easy as pie to fly, and some make you study up on all the operational procedures to fly them safely. However, as anything, it is worth the time and investment to learn.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011
  6. dhermann1

    dhermann1 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,158
    Location:
    Da Bronx, NY, USA
    I used to hang out with the EAA (Experimental Aircraft Assn). It was lots of fun, but flying requires a real commitment. It's one thing to get your license, but to be a competent flyer you really have to put in many hours, on a regular basis. I have great respect for serious experienced pilots. That's on top of the expense.
    That said, best of luck with it.
    During that time I'd say the coolest experience I had was a ride in a little Cessna 150. That was a hoot, with the motor sputtering away practically in your lap.
     
  7. /|\

    /|\ One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Birch Bay
  8. Silver Dollar

    Silver Dollar Practically Family

    Messages:
    613
    Location:
    Louisville, Kentucky
    I'd love to be able to fly vintage warbirds but they take way too much of a commitment and way too much money. Besides, lately they seem to be dropping out of the skies.
     
  9. /|\

    /|\ One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Birch Bay
    It depends on the warbird. Not many people have $2 million for a P-51 -- let alone the cost of owning and flying it, but a T-6/SNJ/Harvard can be had for half the cost of a new Skyhawk. Or there are WWII observation/liaison planes (e.g., Piper, Stinson).
     
  10. andy richards

    andy richards Practically Family

    Messages:
    647
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Gentlemen,

    Who knows what plane this is?
    The picture comes from my deceased grandparent who were on a flight with this beauty.
    Before the flight the picture was taken. Believed it dates from around 1936.
    My grandmother (wearing a white hat) is right below of the "M" of KLM on the fuselage and left from her is my grandfather.
    I would appreciate if there is someone who could possibly identify the type of airplane.

    Cheers,
    Andy

    [​IMG]
     
  11. andy richards

    andy richards Practically Family

    Messages:
    647
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    A few months ago I friend of my took me on a flight with his Cessna.
    On the Ilse of Texes, The Netherlands we were suprised by this flying beauty.
    Stunning!
    This plane is fully restored and converted to a two-seater.
    Sound was excellent during a fly-by!

    Cheers,
    Andy

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Talbot

    Talbot One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,842
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Its a Douglas DC-2.
     
  13. andy richards

    andy richards Practically Family

    Messages:
    647
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Thanks Talbot!
    Andy
     
  14. Subject 18

    Subject 18 New in Town

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    My Grandfather has two planes from the 1940's I'll get pictures next time I see him.
     
  15. /|\

    /|\ One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Birch Bay
    Can't wait to see 'em.
     
  16. Subject 18

    Subject 18 New in Town

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    they're beauties, one's a Stinson Voyager (1940's) and the other is a Piper Cub Super Cruiser I think (1947)
     
  17. R.G. White

    R.G. White One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    162
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Wow, what great planes! They only fuel my dreams of becoming a pilot!
     
  18. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    Santa Rosa, Ca
    I love old aircraft. There is an air museum local to me and I just sit out there for hours staring at the lines of the old war birds. Simply beautiful. Sadly, the closest I can get to wrenching on old aircraft is my 61 vw. (aircooled engine.:D)
     
  19. Talbot

    Talbot One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,842
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Looking forward to pics. Your grandfather has great taste in aircraft.
     

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