Vintage Spectator Shoes

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Veronica Parra, Sep 29, 2005.



  1. To get the ball rolling, here are some of mine: they're all vintage '30s and '40s.

    -- Marc


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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 29, 2011
  2. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,904
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Nunn-Bush 1930s
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    1930s B&W
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    The famous AE for Henry Gretel 1992 Olympic specs
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    Foot Joy B&Ws
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    Florsheims
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    Spanish B&Ws
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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 29, 2011
  3. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Some Nice New Spectator Pix

    Altans [​IMG]
    1940s co-respondents.. see you in court? [​IMG]
    1940s specs [​IMG]
    1950s Florsheim Two Tones [​IMG]
    J&Ms 1930s [​IMG]

    Waist?...you want waist?...I got waist [​IMG]
    Meshmammas [​IMG]
    Nettletons [​IMG]
    French Shriner [​IMG]
    Vintage AEs [​IMG]
     
  4. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

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    Mesh Mammas for your greater Edification Mates...

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  5. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Some Nice New Spectator Pix

    [​IMG] endicottjohnsonspecs [​IMG] florsheim specs

    [​IMG] joseph corcoran specs


    [​IMG] lord douglas specs = on a par with Chevalier quality?[​IMG]

    [​IMG] osullivans ventilated spex [​IMG] wild boar ventilated

    Enjoy!
     
  6. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,127
    Location:
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    Are these your spectators, or just pics in general?
     
  7. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

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    A new pair of UK Specs

    Mate those hopping things are not endangered we eat their meat over here.



    By the way here is a nice UK pair form the 20s -30s:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. RetroRich

    RetroRich New in Town

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Essex Badlands,London
    3 pairs of Co-respondants i've been struggling to wear this anglo-aquatic summer..if it rains any more,i'm gonna cover them in scales & stick fins on them!!

    Crockett & Jones Navy/White apron-front Gibsons.

    [​IMG]
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    Trickers Tan/White cap-toe Oxfords.

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    Stuart Chocolate/White Oxford Brogues.

    [​IMG]
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  9. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

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  10. Warbaby

    Warbaby One Too Many

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    Thought y'all might find some amusement in this exerpt on spectators or co-respondents from Michael Quinion's World Wide Words newsletter. It's from a longer article on the British Government's efforts to simplify legal language.

    ---

    "Even if government proposals stamp out "co-respondent" from the
    legal system, it will be retained in "co-respondent shoes", those
    two-tone horrors that for most men went out with the lounge lizards
    of the 1930s (they're also called spectator shoes). A G MacDonell
    wrote in How Like an Angel in 1934 about "Those singularly
    repulsive shoes of black and white which are called co-respondents
    (quite wrongly called, incidentally, for co-respondents at least
    get or give some fun and these shoes do neither)." In view of the
    male bias of the term, it is notable that one of the most famous
    wearers of the shoes was the divorced Wallis Simpson, whose love
    affair with Edward VIII caused his abdication in 1936.

    The shoes are said to have got that name because they were often
    left outside hotel rooms, ostensibly to be cleaned, as an easily
    identifiable signal that hanky-panky should be assumed to be taking
    place within. This was because the only permitted cause for divorce
    at the time was adultery by one partner. For a couple to arrange a
    divorce in an amicable way, one member - it was commonly the man -
    had to be caught in flagrante with another woman. A minor industry
    grew up in which housemaids in hotels augmented their meagre wages
    by giving evidence of having found the supposedly adulterous couple
    in bed together. This origin for the shoes' name could just be a
    tale, of course. The true source may be just that in the 1930s they
    were the fashionable wear of a spivvy male type, which the Belfast
    Telegraph described in a piece of April 2007 about the cad: "Once
    you could tell him from 20 yards away by his Tattersall check
    waistcoat. Or the co-respondent shoes. Or his driving gloves. No
    gentleman would be seen dead wearing any of them, and the thing
    about the cad is that he lacks the instincts of a gentleman."

    Though fundamental changes in divorce law has long since abolished
    this mucky and degrading business, the term has survived. Indeed, I
    am told that co-respondent shoes are making a comeback. Their name
    will provide a continuing link to a part of British social history
    thankfully now over."

    (World Wide Words is copyright (c) Michael Quinion 2008. All rights
    reserved. The Words Web site is at http://www.worldwidewords.org.
    You may reproduce this newsletter in whole or part in free online
    newsletters, newsgroups or mailing lists provided that you include
    the copyright notice above.}
     
  11. cookie

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    Todays Purchase

    At USD55 I could not resist these today!:D :eek: Florsheims in a red and buck finish.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. =Clipper=

    =Clipper= One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    Redlands, CA
    Great thread!

    I'm going to attempt at bringing these back to life this week and will post pictures of my progress. Just bought these early this year. I was told these were from the 30's. I had them re-soled and bought new laces. More later...

    [​IMG]

    =Adrian=
     
  13. cookie

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    Adrian I fooled around with a pair of 1940s bucks on brown shoes that had not been touched for 20 years and was sorry. Apart from removing the dust on the buckskin don't play around too much with the white part and leave the Patina. The brown part looks like it needs a bit of Lexol or leather conditioner.
     
  14. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

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    McCafees

    [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]

    Made by UK firm McCafee (RIP) for Saks years ago - fabulous punching and nice medallion on the toecap.

    Some others:

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    Very unusual 1930s ventilated specs:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  15. PADDY

    PADDY I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
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    Cookie, you are a bad influence on me!

    Just when I thought I had enough [huh]
     
  16. thunderw21

    thunderw21 I'll Lock Up

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    Oh, you can never have enough spectator. ;)
     
  17. cookie

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    A couple of beauties from OFAS

    French Shriner and Urner with fabulous "spade soles":

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Alden Specs:Unusual scalloped side treatment

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    ET Wright Specs c1940s spade soles

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    McCafees:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  18. cookie

    cookie I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    More of Same

    Nettletons Algonquins:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Suede and leather Algonquins - one of my faves:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Nunn Bush Specs:

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    Geuting Specs:

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    1930s Ventilator Specs:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

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