What Are You Reading

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by Lancealot, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    London, UK
    Simenon never ceases to amaze. That's the wonder of his work.

    And Maigret was such a cultural icon in France that someone even wrote 'Madame Maigret's Cookbook' so that fans could try cooking all his favourite dishes.

    P.S. I like the fact that some of France's greatest cultural contributions - that helped define France in the 20th Century - were actually the product of belgians: the books of Simenon and the songs of Jacques Brel. Even France's most beloved pop star Johnny Hallyday is half Belgian.
     
  2. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Gonzo's Hell's Angels chronicle is a slice of Americana. His Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is excellent.
     
  3. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,519
    Location:
    Northern California
  4. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    image.jpg
     
  5. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,519
    Location:
    Northern California
    Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan's The Fall: The Strain Trilogy
     
  6. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Escape from Davao; The Forgotten Story of the Most Daring Prison Break of the Pacific War by John D. Lukacs.
    Passed to me last week on the train by a federal judge and former Marine Corps fighter pilot.
    Should be placed on every commanding officer reading list.
     
  7. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    just read 'The Photographers Apprentice' on the Kindle, not a bad little book set against the backdrop of the American Civil War....written by Dan Eitreim.
     
  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,296
    Location:
    New York City
    Currently in the middle of "Priscilla: The Hidden Life of an English Woman in Wartime France." As a regular reader of WWII fiction and non-fiction ("Priscilla" is non-fiction), I'm enjoying the different angle this story comes at occupied France - the angle of a basically a-political woman from a convoluted and, mainly, dysfunctional family trying to survive. She's no hero, but how much of a villain you think she is depends on your view of what a person should, could, is supposed to do to survive. I am still reading through it and am enjoying having my "fixed" view of right and wrong challenged. Has anyone else read this yet?
     
  9. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    Right this moment? The newspaper; NYT and WSJ.
     
  10. Hatter4

    Hatter4 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    226
    Location:
    East Petersburg, PA
    I am reading Behind the Scenes at Galileo's Trial , by Richard J.Blackwell
     
  11. hatguy1

    hatguy1 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,145
    Location:
    Da Pairee of da prairee
    Finished Raymond Chandler's "The High Window" last night.

    But Still working my way thru
    "American Caesar, Douglas MacArthur, 1880-1964." (Good, but a very thick book).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Holding on Upside Down; The Life and Work of Marianne Moore, Linda Leavell
    ------
    revisiting Middlemarch, George Eliot; before Rebecca Mead's My Life in Middlemarch :)
     
  13. John Boyer

    John Boyer A-List Customer

    Messages:
    372
    Location:
    Kingman, Kansas USA
    Ike's Bluff: President Eisenhower's Secret Battle To Save The World by Evan Thomas


    Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
     
  14. countryclubjoe

    countryclubjoe Banned

    Messages:
    1,184
    Location:
    NJ/phila
    The Common Law

    Oliver W Holmes
     
  15. frussell

    frussell One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,409
    Location:
    California Desert
    "S," by JJ Abrams and Doug Dorst. More of a multimedia experience than an ordinary book, fun to read, but ultimately ambiguous and slightly disappointing, like most of Abram's work. I'm afraid I need a more definitive ending, if not in movies, then certainly when reading a book. Still pretty fun to work your way through this one. Frank.
     
  16. Smithy

    Smithy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,137
    Location:
    Norway
    Roald Dahl's "Going Solo", the second part of his autobiography which covers his going out to Tanganyika to work for Shell and then his career as a fighter pilot in the RAF. I've been meaning to read this for a while now and I'm pleased I finally did. Really wonderful read.
     
  17. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    image.jpg
     
  18. Smithy

    Smithy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,137
    Location:
    Norway
    Hi Tomasso, another yachtsman eh ;)

    Never seen a Hinckley in the flesh but they look to be beautiful tubs.

    Do you have one yourself or do you crew at the local yacht club?
     
  19. Vilna

    Vilna New in Town

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I'm presently reading "The Sleepwalkers. How Europe went to in 1914" by Christopher Clarke. I got it as a gift in December, but nowadays I'm a slow reader so I've only read a little more than half of the book, and archduke Franz Ferdinand has just managed to get himself and his spouse murdered in Sarajevo. This is a great book. I thought I new this stuff, after all I have degree in history, but no. Clarke really goes to the bottom of the complexities of the international and national situations leading up to war. Interesting and funny despite the grim subject, as this book is, it's a bit unnerving read at this point in time, given the state of international affairs at the moment. A strongly recommended reading as the one hundredth anniversary of this particular nasty event is rapidly approaching.
     
  20. DNO

    DNO One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,815
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children by Romeo Dallaire (Lt. Gen. ret'd). Describes the author's campaign against the use of child soldiers. Very disturbing and well worth reading.
     

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