What Cap Are You Wearing Today?

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Stuffsmith, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. jonesy86

    jonesy86 I'll Lock Up

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    Cordova blue linen.
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  2. Mm25

    Mm25 Practically Family

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  3. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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    Ohhh a leather brim. I have seen a few lather caps and caps with leather brims. They are intriguing. Interesting to contemplate tonight. I struggle with how and what to wear with a "leather cap." I keep thinking it is a statement cap without a leather jacket to pair with. I need to open my paradigm of pairing.

    The Cordova Rockton I do like. I bet with a medium or heavy wool the pleats would really stand out. That 20's style Rockton is super grand!

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    I have a cap made from that Magee Donegal tweed. It is, IMO, a lighter donegal wool. A dressier wool.

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    Excellent consideration sir.


    Today I wanted a "Well Dressed Head."

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    Best to all cap folks, Eric -
     
  4. jonesy86

    jonesy86 I'll Lock Up

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    Stetson 8 panel with a silk/linen blend and leather bill. I think that everything goes well with a leather jacket.
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    Last edited: Nov 30, 2021
  5. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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  6. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    The ushanka was originally a bit of a flight of fancy, never anticipated actually wearing it until one particularly cold Winter a few years ago, when it proved invaluable, even here in London! Slightly milder day today, though, so I on a whim threw on a deerstalker. Technically a country hat, but some rules are meant to be broken...

    The flat cap / driver cap style is still relatively common in the UK, in a smaller footprint than would have been the case much before 1960, like this:

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    Traditionally a working class item, though nowadays equally, of not more, common among the country shooting set (following the long tradition of the upper classes appropriating working man's wardrobe). They're still around, though much more common among a generation now in their seventies than those of working age. Also common, if slightly less so, are the 'fisherman's cap' style hats, like this:

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    This was the first style of hat I wore on a regular basis when I was at university in Belfast and needed something to keep the rain and cold off in Winter. They come and go, but a lot of older folks I see in them. I still have mine, though it shares headtime these days with a lot more else.

    Since 2013, there's been a big revival in eight-panel caps in the UK, obviously down to the popularity of Peaky Blinders. These are now much more common than they ever were back in the 20s in the UK, when other, single-piece top designs were much more the norm. Bit of artistic licence on the show's part. It has been interesting, though, as it definitely did bring out more cap-wearing in the mainstream, even if it hasn't quite reached the level of generic 'fashion'. Small-brim trilbys seem to have come and gone largely; brimmed hats are more common in recent years than they were when I first started wearing them regularly, but still rare enough that they get noticed even by folks who aren't into hats. Overall, the most common here are still various beany-type, shapeless wool hats worn purely for warmth in Winter, though brimmed Summer hats are much more common now than was the case when I was a kid, clearly a result of much greater awareness of sun protection issues than thirty years ago.

    By and large, these days hats crop up much more regularly in women's fashion than men's in the UK. For men, it tends to be a subculture thing - as well as the Moneyed Classes, at least among those of a certain age. It'll be some time yet before there's a return to the hat, but I wouldn't rule it out yet.
     
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  7. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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    Edward; Thanks for the detailed post. Cheers on the deerstalker. It is fun to hear how different locations in the world wear head gear.

    Drivers caps - agreed the style has been about for a long time. I like how you described today's iteration as a "smaller footprint." I will definitely use that phrase in similar context. The influence of the TV drama show, Blinders, has been evident in the small circle of folks that I see. It started with big draped caps and the ones I see recently are a bit smaller. My wife says that they are getting wear out of the caps they purchased a couple years ago. Good point, but it can not explain it entirely in this consumer era.

    Yes I too do see the wooly caps worn often and frequently with labels displayed prominently. I have one and find it not as comfortable as a cap with my collar pulled up. Too each their own. Now when I go skiing or running the wooly cap is just the ticket.

    I do see males in the 40-60+ age group wearing caps in the Minnesota winters. We are a minority. A "special minority" I dare say.

    Cheers Edward, Eric -
     
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  8. I've always preferred the Drivers caps with the more conservative dimensions; more streamlined, cleaner lines. I think I started seeing them here in the U.S. in the 1970s, maybe even the late-1960s. The older style caps with the considerably larger footprint never made sense to me--why have all of that fabric flopping around on your head like a cloth pancake?

    In this part of the world the "ball cap" still reigns supreme--structured, unstructured "dad" caps, multiple colors or monochrome, blank or any logo you can think of embroidered onto the front of the crown, etc., etc.. For a brief blip in time the inexpensive "hipster" trilbies seemed to be gaining a bit of ground, but those ball caps are everywhere. I must confess, I even own a few myself--they're handy for those times when attending an "event" might put a better, more favored cap or hat at risk of being damaged by either the event or the people in attendance--yardwork, helping someone move, rowdy/stoned concertgoers, drunken revelers celebrating a win of their favorite sports team, and so on.
     
  9. Mm25

    Mm25 Practically Family

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    Work cap again. I normally would not post it again, but got a great pic with Star, a Dutch Warmblood cross, from a stable I volunteer at. 13976407-DA47-4008-82A5-575B0381BCF2.jpeg
     
  10. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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    Terrific cap adventure sir.

    A warm blood usually indicates calm and trainable as in an all around horse. Is this a horse that you ride or train for equestrian events?

    I ask as I have been for nearly a decade and a half an equestrian's husband. My wife used to own a Dutch Gelderlander and a Lipizzan horse when she did equestrian events. My non-riding tastks were transportation, care, exercise, cheering, video, performance records and clean-up tasks. I always thought this a lot of work for me, a short balding guy who does not really enjoy horse back riding.


    Afternoon and evening escapades in a Cordova Cap.

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    Cheers to all cap folks, Eric -
     
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  11. Oh, that's a shame. When I was very young a very kind woman called "Shorty" by everyone who knew her lived up our street and babysat me frequently. She had a full horse training ring and three stalls on her property in which to keep any animals brought there for training. So I was riding horses before I was 10 years old. Not frequently or vigorously, but enough for me to get a "feel" for it and discover I liked it. Apparently whatever lessons I learned then stuck with me, because the few times I've ridden as an adult I felt very comfortable in the saddle and enjoyed it tremendously each time.
     
  12. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Glasses look great - a sort of faux-browline style, with a single-piece front. Never seen any quite the same before, very nice!
     
  13. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt Practically Family

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  14. Mm25

    Mm25 Practically Family

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    Yes, horses are a lot of work. I am recently come into the horse world. I volunteer at a riding stable, so I groom, train, feed, and of course, muck out stalls.

    The plus side is all the horse interaction I want and no vet or boarding fees, since I don’t own anything.

    I ride some and am learning to drive, which is my real interest. Star, from the picture, is a primarily a carriage horse.
     
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  15. Mm25

    Mm25 Practically Family

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    It’s very relaxing to spend an afternoon, out with horses.
    Grooming is easier done in a cap, then a western hat as well. Lol
     
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  16. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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    I never had any riding experience and my "husband duties" did not endear me to the horses. Your riding experiences sound enjoyable. Horses are your normal.

    Thanks Edward. The glasses are Moscot Lemtosch, https://moscot.com/collections/lemt...MI8MDfs-zC9AIVWW5vBB09nwGhEAAYASAAEgLlbvD_BwE , in their black crystal. I like them enough to have a couple different frames and a sunglasses lense pair.

    Excellent cap that pairs well with your jacket.

    Cheers, Eric -
     
  17. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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    Today's escapades found me wearing a Green Tweed Fox Brothers wool cap.

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    The wool is much darker than shows in the pic of me wearing the cap.

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    The under sweatband label is a nice touch by the maker to remind, me the user, of the fabric used.

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    This pic showcases the stitched brim. Jonathan Cordova has been using a stitched brim vs. a stiff brim material for some of my last caps. I like it in that they can take a curved shape and return to "straight" easily. Remarkable how much more comfortable they are on the forehead.

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    The last pics showcases the brim and the leather sweat. Hand made with high quality materials.

    Cheers folks, Eric -
     
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  18. jonesy86

    jonesy86 I'll Lock Up

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    Monsivais 8 dart Wabash flat cap with leather bill.

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  19. Short Balding Guy

    Short Balding Guy I'll Lock Up

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  20. jonesy86

    jonesy86 I'll Lock Up

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    Life is good. Much of my cap enthusiasm came from your many postings of wonderful caps, and loyalty to these special artisans who craft them.
    Thank you,
    David
     

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