What Was The Last Movie You Watched?

Discussion in 'The Moving Picture' started by Amy Jeanne, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,574
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Rewatching "Lion in Winter'. Watched about 1/2 last night and my eyes were tired so we decided to hit pause and will finish tonight. The dialogue too good to just power through it.
     
    Zombie_61 and Fading Fast like this.
  2. mikepara

    mikepara Practically Family

    Messages:
    563
    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    The last proper movie I watched was Paris Blues is a 1961 American drama film made on location in Paris, starring Sidney Poitier as expatriate jazz saxophonist Eddie Cook, and Paul Newman as trombone-playing Ram Bowen. Two American jazz musicians are content exploring Paris as it allows them to grow as artists. They fall in love with two beautiful American tourists and must now decide between music and love. unnamed.jpg
     
    Fading Fast and belfastboy like this.
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    Agree with all your comments. I really enjoyed this one. My comments here #26801
     
  4. navetsea

    navetsea I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,601
    Location:
    East Java
    Underwater 2020

    typical movie about underwater base in trouble, underwater monster, with buzz cut kristen steward as hero... surprisingly enjoyable
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  5. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,911
    Location:
    Chicago
    "Soldiers in the Rain" starring Steve McQueen and Jackie Gleason - WHAT a duo! As my girlfriend remarked, "it's like they're all on cocaine!"
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    0072eede.jpg
    Address Unknown form 1944 with Paul Lukas and K.T. Stevens
    • WWII propaganda film meets film noir meets silent-era angle-and-mood cinematography
      • It works thanks in large part to director William Cameron Menzie's background and talents in art design
    • Based on a short, but powerful anti-Nazi novel by Katherine Kressman Taylor, this also short, seventy-five minute, movie warps through its story of two German friends (one Jewish, one Christian) and business partners living in America in the '30s who see their friendship and families torn apart after the Christian one returns to German and gradually becomes a Nazi
    • To say this story is familiar by now is fair - Mortal Storm, Watch on the Rhine and others had already tread this ground by '44 - but Address Unknown does it as well as those with, as noted, a greater emphasis on mood-driving visuals (Nazi evil lends itself to foreboding camera angles and harrowing images)
    • Also look for the powerful scene where K.T. Stevens as the Jewish daughter and aborning actress (with an Aryan stage name) makes a life-determining decision to quote Christian Bible verse during a performance to stand up to Nazi censorship.
      • A Jewish actress, risking life and limb by quoting Christian scripture to denounce Nazi propaganda in the heart of Hitler's Germany, is about as moving as it gets
    • And here's an oddity as the book is almost always better than the movie, but this time the movie alters the story to add in a powerful plot twist (it's only revealed right at the end) that enhances the story by delivering a brutal-but-moral message of revenge


    MV5BNjFmMzUxZjEtYTJmMC00ODRlLWE0YmUtMDkyZjc5MmE2YTdmXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMzk3NTUwOQ@@._V1_.jpg
    Till the End of Time from 1946 with Guy Madison, Dorothy McGuire and Robert Mitchum
    • It treads the same ground as the much-more-well-known The Best Years of Our Lives, but deserves attention despite, overall, being a less-complete effort
    • Basically, it looks at the life of a few marines returning from WWII - one in fine physical health, one with a steel plate in his head and one who lost his legs - and how they adjust to civilian life and how their friends, neighbors and families adjust to their return
    • The men all carry wounds - mental, physical or both - and the adjustment is difficult for all the reasons we've come to know today, but that we were still learning in 1946
    • With those wounds, the adjustment is, honestly, bad as family and friends try to be understanding, but also just want the returning vets to re-integrate (not mean-spirited, but you can feel that almost everyone wants the vets to "just get over it"). When the returning vets can't adjust on others' timelines, it becomes a series of battles: families battle, old-friends (ones who went, ones who didn't) battle, civilians and vets battle, girlfriends and vets battle and bosses and vets battle
    • For painful realism, the scene where the main characters see a vet have the shakes in a coffee shop is honest even if the "solution" is a bit easy - and that's the movie itself as it pings back and forth between honest-and-raw and easy-ish solutions with happy endings
    • Hey, it's 1946, we get it, the country probably wasn't ready for a completely honest and brutal reveal of the damage war did to these men, so credit to Till the end of Time for weaving in a decent amount of honesty and brutality even if the overall effort is uneven
     
    Worf likes this.
  7. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,883
    Location:
    Troy, New York, USA
    ^^ Seen both films several times and like them both particularly the latter... I too liked the soldier with the shakes scene and the bar scene where Vets are "welcome" in these new "Patriotic" organizations that sprang up after the war (NOT the VFW or the American Legion) as long as their the "right" kind of vets... No blacks or jews allowed. I love how they put the kibosh to that little picnic. I like T.T.E.o.T and reviewed it a few months ago. As you say it's a poor man's "The Best Years of Our Lives" but seeing how it's an RKO film and the company was flat broke, they did the best they could.

    Worf
     
  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    Great point about the scummy "Vet" organizations that popped up after the war. I feel remiss that I left that out as it was handled very well by showing the resigned look (sadly, it was one less of anger than of "oh, this again") on the black serviceman whom we had come to know a bit and when Mitchum made his comment about his buddy (very Jewish sounding name that I forgot) who died heroically. Credit to RKO, the writers, directors - all - they didn't mince words or opinions on this one. The veterans', the main characters, response was very clear: these men that you and your organization want to exclude - black, Jewish, Catholic - fought and died along with us, so we want no part of your prejudice.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2020
    Zombie_61 likes this.
  9. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    There's a fascinating radio adaptation of "Address Unknown" done in 1942 by "Treasury Star Parade," a government-produced propaganda series done to promote war bonds. The story is boiled down to fifteen minutes, but the fast pace makes it even more intense --

     
  10. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,520
    Location:
    Northern California
    The tail end of Out of the Past and right now, Laura. I’ve seen both many times and really have them going in the background while correcting papers and answering questions online.
    :D
     
    Zombie_61 and Fading Fast like this.
  11. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    When time allows, I'm looking forward to listening to this. Thank you for posting it.
     
  12. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    I'm doing the same, except I'm trading the markets not correcting papers, but same idea - great background movies as I love the atmosphere they create.
     
    Touchofevil and Zombie_61 like this.
  13. mikepara

    mikepara Practically Family

    Messages:
    563
    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    Well I decided to watch The Maltese Falcon again yesterday. I'm not posting any pics as I'm sure, having had Threads of it's own on here, everyone on the board is familiar with it. Although watchable, I must admit that I watched it for the clothes to be honest. Most of the acting is so bad, especially Peter Lorre as Joel Ciaro and Elisha Cook Junior as Wilmer Cook.
     
    belfastboy likes this.
  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    And now "Gilda." Wonderful background lineup today on TCM.
     
    Touchofevil likes this.
  15. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed A-List Customer

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress
    revisiting a series of 7 films I enjoy and haven't watched in decades... this past weekend I did a double feature of the first two...
    road_to_singapore_movie-poster.jpg RoadToZanzibar_1941 Movie Poster.jpg
     
    Touchofevil likes this.
  16. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,911
    Location:
    Chicago
    Made it about halfway through The Creature from the Black Lagoon before I couldn't keep my eyes open anymore. Nothing against the movie, I was just tired last night.
     
  17. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    Outstanding. The music was very of the period - perhaps a bit overwrought - but said "old radio." Also, impressive what they did in 15 minutes (or, really, about 12 for the show).
     
  18. M Brown

    M Brown One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    279
    Location:
    N Tx
    Dr Strangelove
     
  19. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,896
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    May I inquire what particulars are you active?
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2020
  20. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,175
    Location:
    New York City
    I mainly manage investment portfolios, so I am active in several asset classic owing to regular rebalancing and opportunistic trading. Hence, I'm involved in equities, fixed income (through individual securities, ETFs and CEFs), commodities (ETFs and CEFs) and alternatives (direct investments, ETFs, CEFs). A lot of what I do is longer-term portfolio moves, but I add alpha (or try) via active trading in equities, municipals and CEFs (some of the products that I've traded and originated over the years).

    How 'bout you?
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.