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What was the last TV show you watched?

LizzieMaine

Bartender
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Bogart was "strongly encouraged" by his handlers to repudiate actual "card-carrying" CPUSA members like Sterling Hayden, which he did -- but he never wholly repudiated his position opposing the HUAC. "I went Washington because I believed Americans were being denied their constitutional rights," was the part of his statement that didn't get publicized as much as the rest of it. Lauren Bacall, for her part, continued to defend their trip to Washington to oppose HUAC for the rest of her life.

The performer who did grovel -- and there's no other word for it -- was Edward G. Robinson, who after a year of no work, signed his name to a ghost-written "I was duped!" piece appearing in, of all things, the "American Legion Magazine, " which was enough to satisfy the headhunters, but his career never really recovered.
 

fashion frank

One Too Many
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1,173
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Woonsocket Rhode Island
So far I’m into season three of Boardwalk Empire and realized how much I really enjoyed this series ! On another note has anyone watched the show “ Timeless” I’m not sure what it is about but saw a image and the people were dressed in period clothing ? All The Best , Fashion Frank
 
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15,572
Location
New York City
Bogart was "strongly encouraged" by his handlers to repudiate actual "card-carrying" CPUSA members like Sterling Hayden, which he did -- but he never wholly repudiated his position opposing the HUAC. "I went Washington because I believed Americans were being denied their constitutional rights," was the part of his statement that didn't get publicized as much as the rest of it. Lauren Bacall, for her part, continued to defend their trip to Washington to oppose HUAC for the rest of her life.

The performer who did grovel -- and there's no other word for it -- was Edward G. Robinson, who after a year of no work, signed his name to a ghost-written "I was duped!" piece appearing in, of all things, the "American Legion Magazine, " which was enough to satisfy the headhunters, but his career never really recovered.

Thank you. So there was something to the documentary I saw. What do think Bogart was thinking?
 

Bushman

My Mail is Forwarded Here
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3,974
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Chicago
So far I’m into season three of Boardwalk Empire and realized how much I really enjoyed this series ! On another note has anyone watched the show “ Timeless” I’m not sure what it is about but saw a image and the people were dressed in period clothing ? All The Best , Fashion Frank
Timeless is a fun time traveling show where the heroes have to go back into different time periods to stop the disruption of the timeline. It's just a shame it was canceled because the second season ended on a huge cliffhanger.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
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30,618
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
Thank you. So there was something to the documentary I saw. What do think Bogart was thinking?

From everything I've read, and given his impeccable New Deal credentials, I think he was being absolutely straight when he said he was concerned with the HUAC trampling over constitutional rights. He was by all accounts furious when he found that Hayden -- who had fought alongside Tito's partisans in Yugoslavia during the war -- actually had carried a CPUSA dues book for a couple of years. The issue wasn't so much that Hayden had been a Red, but that Hayden hadn't told him so from the beginning.

Bogart was not a particularly sophisticated man, intellectually or politically -- Bacall was the brains of that relationship, by all accounts -- and I doubt he worried too much about the shades of political nuance in his various friendships. What mattered to him was that, in his view, someone he'd trusted had caused him to lose face. This led to some heated exchanges within his personal circle -- Danny Kaye had to be restrained from punching Bogart in the mouth after Bogart turned on Hayden.

Sterling Hayden, for his part, had more important fish to fry than worrying about what Humphrey Bogart thought of him -- the FBI threatened to take away his children if he didn't name names, and he knuckled under. He lived to regret that, and strongly denounced the FBI in later years for resorting to such fascist tactics, and also denounced himself for letting them get away with it -- to the point of falling into a near-suicidal depression.

The postwar years were not a pleasant time to be in show business, and the performers who passed thru that crucible, whichever side they were on, did not remember it fondly.
 

Mae

Call Me a Cab
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2,463
Location
fort worth, tx
Timeless is a fun time traveling show where the heroes have to go back into different time periods to stop the disruption of the timeline. It's just a shame it was canceled because the second season ended on a huge cliffhanger.

It's been given a reprieve, yet again, thanks to the loyal fanbase. There's going to be a two-hour movie to wrap things up.

Doctor Strange posted a link about it a page back. Click this to read it. (IF I'm doing this right?): What was the last TV show you watched?
 
Messages
15,572
Location
New York City
From everything I've read, and given his impeccable New Deal credentials, I think he was being absolutely straight when he said he was concerned with the HUAC trampling over constitutional rights. He was by all accounts furious when he found that Hayden -- who had fought alongside Tito's partisans in Yugoslavia during the war -- actually had carried a CPUSA dues book for a couple of years. The issue wasn't so much that Hayden had been a Red, but that Hayden hadn't told him so from the beginning.

Bogart was not a particularly sophisticated man, intellectually or politically -- Bacall was the brains of that relationship, by all accounts -- and I doubt he worried too much about the shades of political nuance in his various friendships. What mattered to him was that, in his view, someone he'd trusted had caused him to lose face. This led to some heated exchanges within his personal circle -- Danny Kaye had to be restrained from punching Bogart in the mouth after Bogart turned on Hayden.

Sterling Hayden, for his part, had more important fish to fry than worrying about what Humphrey Bogart thought of him -- the FBI threatened to take away his children if he didn't name names, and he knuckled under. He lived to regret that, and strongly denounced the FBI in later years for resorting to such fascist tactics, and also denounced himself for letting them get away with it -- to the point of falling into a near-suicidal depression.

The postwar years were not a pleasant time to be in show business, and the performers who passed thru that crucible, whichever side they were on, did not remember it fondly.

Thank you
 
Messages
15,572
Location
New York City
Binging a combination of Storage Wars, American Pickers and Forged in Fire.

I am alone on an army base. Do not judge me...

I will only make fun of what someone else watches after I have burned every DVR I've ever used. :)

We watch "American Pickers" BTW - the "reality" stuff in that show (as in all of them) is nonsense, but love a lot of the items they find.
 

Doctor Strange

I'll Lock Up
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5,064
Location
Hudson Valley, NY
The first two episodes of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel on Amazon Prime.

I know we have folks here who loved this series. I gave it two full episodes... and I don't love it, and probably won't watch the rest.

Everything about it feels totally bogus to me, from the dialog to the characters/situations to the hit-or-miss period stylization. And the endless parade of dead-horse-trope Jewish stereotypes are borderline offensive. How come we're not "woke" about this particular set of clichés yet in this era when fair and accurate "representation" is so important?!?
 

Ernest P Shackleton

One Too Many
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1,180
Location
Midwest
Episode one of season four of “Better Call Saul” and the first episode of “Lodge 49.”
I doubt Lodge 49 will end up a TV great, but I was surprisingly pleased. It was plenty entertaining, set at a good pace, and not merely geared toward Millennials. For some reason, I thought it was going to be another Millennial series. So far, it isn't.
 
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Northern California
I doubt Lodge 49 will end up a TV great, but I was surprisingly pleased. It was plenty entertaining, set at a good pace, and not merely geared toward Millennials. For some reason, I thought it was going to be another Millennial series. So far, it isn't.
We too were surprised. Big Lebowski/Inherent Vices influenced for sure. It was a nice enough first episode. We will give it another chance when episode two comes out.
:D
 
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Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,040
Location
London, UK
An episode of the beautiful Netflix version of Lemony Snicket, and a recent episode of the BBC's Who do you think you are?, featuring Boy George. Anyone interested in Ireland's troubled history during the early decades of the 20th Century would do well to check this one out if they can - it turns out that George's great uncle was Thomas Bryan, one of the 'Forgotten Ten' executed at Mountjoy Prison during the last year of the Irish War of Independence. (One of the Ten has, of course, been rather better remembered that the others, he being Kevin Barry of the well-known song.) There is some excellent footage in the programme of both Mountjoy and Kilmainham gaols, which is worth seeing for anyone who has an interest in the history of the British penal system. KIlmainham especially was a product of Victorian era prison reform, and has become the go-to Hollywood stand in for British prisons in many films. (It's well worth visiting the prison museum at Kilmainham if ever you get a chance.) By complete coincidence, it turned out that Thomas Bryan had lived in the very premises which now house the Dublin Tenement Museum, which gave it an extra sense of interest to see how people lived in those days. Whatever people's feeling about the politics of that period - which are still very much alive in Ireland today, particularly in the North - it puts a very human face on the whole thing. Notably, Thomas Bryan's last letter from prison remarks that it is always the women who suffer most in these things - a point echoed within the decade in Sean O'Casey's Dublin Trilogy of plays.
 
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