Young loungers

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Bernard Newman, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. MikeBravo

    MikeBravo One Too Many

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    Melbourne, Australia
    I just like the clothes and the lifestyle. I don't think many people want World War Two to start up again
     
  2. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Ever since I started giving a vintage flair to my wardrobe, one thing people have come to expect is that I always dress immaculately.

    I'm...not sure how true that is, but it's nice to know that I've got a reputation as a snappy dresser. My colleagues at the local thrift-shop where I volunteer are throwing a one year birthday party (of the opening of the shop) in a couple of month's time.

    The manager was asking us for ideas about what we should expect at the party, what we should bring, what ideas we had about how to make it memorable.

    My friend Ed said that we could expect me to show up looking impeccably dressed.

    D'awww...
     
  3. The Good

    The Good Call Me a Cab

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    2,363
    Location:
    California, USA
    I get that, that's my opinion as well. I pretty much care mainly for the style, not the particularly bad happenings of the era. If you think about it, life during the Golden Era, as it's referred to, would have been pretty miserable for many people, and yet far worse for others. If one were wealthy, and in the United States at least, Anglo-Saxon Americans, they would have had a good old time, but it wasn't this way for a great deal of the population, especially immigrants.

    All of this history is fascinating though...
     
  4. Juliet

    Juliet A-List Customer

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    Stranded in Hungary
    In some way I think, women were certainly more respected. Look at today's idols. Women who try to outdo each other in "my breasts are falling out" and "is it a skirt or a belt" or "close up of my behind on screen" categories.
     
  5. RodeoRose

    RodeoRose A-List Customer

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    This is so true! I feel the irony of it a lot. People sometimes give me the side-eye and a sort of "well who do you think you are?" sneer, but I feel like I dress so much more demurely than a lot of girls (the "ordinary" girls who pile on the bronzer and shimmery eyeshadow, for instance). I think I tend to be a little lost in a daydream, though: I assume that because I would have looked totally normal in 1930 (or whatever era I happen to be dressing in) that I should look perfectly respectable today. Not so, sadly! Seamed stockings, high heels, and red lips have whole new connotations to modern eyes.
     
  6. Juliet

    Juliet A-List Customer

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    Stranded in Hungary
    Oh, yes. Every time someone comments on how red lipstick is provocative, I have to stifle the urge to tell them that their grandmother probably wore it regularly, too.
     
  7. Geiamama

    Geiamama One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Cheltenham, UK
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  8. MikeBravo

    MikeBravo One Too Many

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    I was recently watching a documentary on the Depression of the 30's. The narrator talked about the effect the depression had on different people. Rich people weren't too bad off, before you had $20 million and now had only $5 million, and survived. The poor were already badly off, now they were a little worse off than before, but surviving. The ones who really suffered were the middle class, who had just started to become comfortable and had experienced a boom in wealth due to the stock market rises. Now they were poor, and the fall was a big one.
     
  9. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

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    During the depression, my family was well-off. They were buying brand new Pierce Arrows and such. Their grandson, my grandpa, wasn't so lucky. He was eating lard sandwiches...
     
  10. Chas

    Chas One Too Many

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    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I think we need to chip in and organize a yearly prize for the youngest lounger who joins the FL, to be given @ year's end...provided they provide proof of age, of course.
     
  11. Yeps

    Yeps Call Me a Cab

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    Location:
    Philly
    Well, the poor I am sure really suffered to, but it wasn't anything particularly new.
     
  12. MikeBravo

    MikeBravo One Too Many

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    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I have an uncle who still eats dripping (lard) sandwiches.
     
  13. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

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    Location:
    Portage, Wis.
    I didn't know anyone still did that and until today had only known maybe 2 others with similar experiences.

     
  14. p71towny

    p71towny Familiar Face

    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    Fort Wayne, IN
    My grandpa tells me about those but I'll pass. And I'll eat almost ANYTHING..
     
  15. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I'm afraid to ask. What the hell is a LARD SANDWICH? It sounds most unhealthy and fattening.
     
  16. The Good

    The Good Call Me a Cab

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    It sounds disgusting, and full of butter and oils... I haven't ever had one, myself.
     
  17. Pompidou

    Pompidou One Too Many

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    If it tastes good, I'll eat one. I just googled it. After you cook up some fatty meat, bacon sounds best, pour the grease onto a couple pieces of bread. Hmm. I'll see what I can do. Whether it tastes good or bad, it'll be a great story for later. "I can't believe you ate old pan fat drippings! That's disgusting!" I wonder what kind of meat would be most authentic? I've always liked the taste of fat. If I remember, I'll take a picture.
     
  18. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

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    During the depression, my grandpa's family was very poor and lard was cheap and plentiful. They put it on a sandwich like you'd butter bread and that was lunch.
     
  19. DJH

    DJH I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Ft Worth, TX
    My dad is a Yorkshireman and he would always save the drippings from the roast meats on Sunday, let it solidify and eat on sandwiches through the week.

    We lived in the South of England and the old bloke was quite a novelty because of all the weird stuff he would eat - dripping, tripe, chitlings (these were the nastiest) and other things that most people would through away.

    Because we lived by the sea, he would also go and dig up his own shellfish. It was quite common to get home and find the bath full of disgusting things like whelks. No wonder I don't like seafood :D
     
  20. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

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    10,885
    Location:
    Portage, Wis.
    Makes me cringe! I'm a bit of a picky eater.
     

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