Let's See Your Watches! The Vintage Watch Thread.

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Chamorro, Sep 27, 2003.

  1. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I believe you're trying to think of the Montgomery dial, but these are NOT Montogomery's. Every minute had a red marker all around the outside chapter ring on those dials. I own a 23j Waltham Vanguard that has a mint Montgomery dial.

    These Hamiliton/Illinois dials are only standard railroad style with red 5 minute marks on the outside ring. Still railroad approved, though. Regards! Michaelson
     
  2. Fuente

    Fuente Familiar Face

    Messages:
    58
    Time pieces...

    My favorite is the curve case Gruen that preceded the Curvex, it's not as elongated as the Cuvex case.

    2nd is a Cort Tuxedo Watch that the Lovely Mrs Fuente wears

    3rd is the Hamilton Ultra thin that my dad gave me in the 50's

    With a small wrist, big watches look a bit out of place on me.

    My everyday watch is a Movado with a cream face, Roman Numerals and a date wheel.

    For scuba diving and other sports activities I wear a TAG black and gold

    Gosh how much stuff have I accumulated over the years, Watches, Pens, Clothes, Cigar Box Openers and other Cigar items, signed and numbered lithographs ??? no wonder I'm always broke

    Rich :cool2:
     
  3. binkmeisterRick

    binkmeisterRick A-List Customer

    Messages:
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    Location:
    The Island of Misfit Hats
    Gee, Michaelson, I don't think you could've guessed it better! ;)

    Yep, Michaelson did some research for me on that watch, for which I am grateful! Ilove this watch and wear it every day. :)

    bink
     
  4. Mycroft

    Mycroft One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,993
    Location:
    Florida, U.S.A. for now
    Hey Chad, Where did you find your watch? It intreges me.
     
  5. android

    android One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    255
    I think you're right. I was looking at another watch when I bought this one with a Montgomery, but it had hairline cracks and this one did not, so I got this one instead.
     
  6. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Montgomery dials are interesting, as if they're mint, the price skyrockets, but if they're hairlined, folks lose interest. I've seen that a lot. Regards. Michaelson
     
  7. Vladimir Berkov

    Vladimir Berkov One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,291
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I don't know anything about watches, but I really want to get a vintage one to go with the "look."

    Are there any vintage watches that look sort of like that Hamilton Senaca (rectangular or stepped) which are both worth buying and which go for less than $150?
     
  8. android

    android One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    255
    I bought a Seiko dress watch in the early eighties that had a case almost identical to the Seneca. It has two steps instead of three and roman numeral. I really love the style of the Seiko, but have never been able to find anything exactly like it.

    It was about a $200 watch, so it hasn't aged well. It's brassing and the carbechon on the crown is trashed.

    I've seen watches that look like this around, so you just got to keep an eye out.

    The Seneca/Sherwood is a little difficult to come by. Not super rare, but not as easily found as an Hamilton Donald.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Well, I went to an antique and collectables show this morning and found myself yet another railroad grade pocketwatch. It doesn't look like much but it runs great so far and as accurate as they are expect to be. Here are a few pictures:

    [​IMG]
    The movement

    [​IMG]
    The face

    It is just a simple case as were most railroad watches because the railroad worker could afford only to buy the high grade movement and not an expensive case to go with it. I like simple cases anyway because they tell me that the watch was used and not put away in a box.
    The movement is a 21 jewel Hampden Dueber model. It has all the usual accoutrements required: double roller, gold train, adjusted five positions and lever set.
    Not bad for $150 bucks. A working watch that keeps time. Considering it probably cost around $50 when new. Try to find a comparable watch made today for less. :p

    Regards to all,

    J
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  10. Vladimir Berkov

    Vladimir Berkov One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,291
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Android, the wristwatch I lost (which engaged me on this quest for a new watch) was actually a Seiko almost identical to the one in your picture only mine had a brown band. I really liked the watch because it was very thin and elegant. Someone in charge has decided that almost all modern mens watches will be freaking huge, which I suppose works fine if you are Hulk Hogan, but for normal-sized people it is a big pain.



    James, I have my great-grandfather's watch, an Elgin. The watch hasn't worked in years, and I am not sure where to get it fixed. He was a railroad man, and the watch is silver but very plain, just like you said railroad watches tend to be.
     
  11. I think Michaelson might be able to refer you to someone who can do a very good job of fixing your watch. The best way to enjoy them is when they are working. Your watch likely just needs a cleaning and it is more than worth it to get it done properly with that grade of watch.
    I am not sure if anyone explained why railroad watches are fairly plain (I think someone mentioned the regulations and why they were created already though) but put simply it was meant to tell the time accurately. Hunting cases were not allowed, watches that set via the pendant were not allowed, fancy roman numeral dials were not allowed and only bold black hands were allowed.
    This made it possible for a railroad worker to pull the watch from his pocket quickly and view the time without any hesitation or accidentally changing the set time in the process. If a watch gained 30 seconds in a week or two then it had to be taken in for adjustment or repair so that it passed the next inspection. Yes, they were inspected to ascertain the accuracy of the watch. The engineers and conductors were required to keep a card with a complete record of a watch's performance--in ink. Repairs and adjustments were done only by approved watchmakers. These repairs and adjustments were noted on the card. Oh yes, only authorized inspectors could inspect said watches. They were tough on the watches accuracy and it probably saved many lives as a result. It also resulted in the great timepieces we still use today---well over 100 years later in some cases.

    Regards to all,

    J
     
  12. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    The best place to send your watch for a free estimate would be The Escapement, P.O. Box 522, Pooler, GA 31322, phone 912-330-0866 EDT and ask for Ed Uberall, the owner. Top drawer pocketwatch repair, specializing in railroad movements. Regards! Michaelson

    The Escapement
     
  13. scotrace

    scotrace Head Bartender Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,297
    Location:
    Small Town Ohio, USA
    Soft Spot for Hampdens

    Your new watch was manufactured 25 miles from my front door.
    Deuber division made the movements, Hampden made the dials and cases. Hence, Deuber-Hampden. Just like any other old watch, lots of them are recased.
    They used naming conventions based on Canton and Ohio figures. The small ladies movement was a "Molly Stark." there was also a large "McKinley" movement, and a "General Stark." Canton is in Stark County, Ohio.
     
  14. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hampden sold out lock/stock and barrel to Russia in 1929, and they moved the entire factory to Moscow. All records were either moved, destroyed, or are sitting undiscovered in some warehouse, eagerly sought by Hampden collectors everywhere. Great watches by the way. Next to Illinois watches, I've probably owned more Hampdens over the years than any other. Ironic too, considering I've always thought of myself as an Elgin man. :rolleyes: Regards! Michaelson
     
  15. scotrace

    scotrace Head Bartender Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,297
    Location:
    Small Town Ohio, USA
    Russians

    Hampden and Packard!

    They are nice watches, though I must confess I only have a couple of pocket watches.
    My wife occasionally wears a Molly Stark on a brooch-type pin. Very neat. The thing has stopped running. The crystal cracked; we sent it out, running, for replacement, and it came back with a nice new crystal but stopped cold.
    Repairing it again has not been at the top of the priority list.
     
  16. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Molly Starks are notorious for getting overbanked, essentially locking up the balance. Not a biggie in a fix, but aggrevating when it happens. Regards. Michaelson
     
  17. binkmeisterRick

    binkmeisterRick A-List Customer

    Messages:
    477
    Location:
    The Island of Misfit Hats
    I hate it when I overbank my Molly Stark, though she doesn't seem to complain too much. :p

    bink
     
  18. Molly Stark? I must have ten if I have one. Those things breed like rats. :p They all do not work though.

    Regards to all,

    J
     
  19. Hmm. I thought it was the other way around. Dueber was a case manufacturer. He had controlling interest in a watch company in 1886. An anti-trust law forced Dueber to buy the Hampden watch company in 1889 because the watch case manufacturers formed a boycott against Dueber. He showed them. :p From 1889 until 1927 they made millions of watches. :p
    It was a shame that Amtorg USSR bought them out but times were tough for watchmakers in the 1920s--not to mention the depression.
    The movement you really want to find is a George Walker or a State Street. Those were super high grade movements that sold for $200 in the later part of the 1800s! All the Railway models are pretty nice as well---especially the 23 jewel ones. ;)

    Regards to all,

    J
     
  20. Michaelson

    Michaelson One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I recently obtained a two tone 17j Special Railway myself, all original. Two tone 17j SR's aren't even listed in the Shugart watch listings, so it's pretty rare. Regards! Michaelson
     

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