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Terms Which Have Disappeared

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10,765
Location
My mother's basement
^^^^^
People who pay closer attention to such matters would tell us that “Chesterfield” is specific style of couch, like this one …

IMG_1983.jpeg

I hear they’re not the most comfortable. I have what is sometimes called a “tuxedo” sofa, which is distinguished by the arms and back being the same height, a la a Chesterfield, but the tops of the arms and back are flat, not rolled, and the upholstery isn’t tufted. It isn’t the most comfortable, either. And even that definition is subject to debate. I’ve seen styles that don’t meet all those criteria called tuxedo sofas.
 
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Most of the under 50s I know are very much into "vinyls," which is a term that makes my skin crawl, so I'd suspect that even if they haven't heard the term they could figure it out pretty quick.

Now if only the term "vinyls" would disappeasr in my lifetime. Besides, I only have "shellacs."
As an over 50 vinyl enthusiast, referring to records as “vinyls” makes my skin crawl as well. But I’m somewhat comforted that the kids are actually interested in vinyl records. It’s renewed popularity has dramatically increased the availability of both records and gear, though it’s driven up the price of vintage gear to ridiculous levels. Not to mention it’s nice to see people investing the time and patience the deliberate nature of records requires. You have to slow down and really want to listen, and that’s a positive trend, in my always humble opinion.
 
Messages
11,958
Location
Southern California
Most of the under 50s I know are very much into "vinyls," which is a term that makes my skin crawl...

My guess is that this is due to the obsession among the younger crowds with constantly taking photos of themselves. Calling something an "album" would likely draw their minds towards a "photo album" (on their computer, laptop, notebook, phone, or whatever electronic device is in favor these days) rather than a "record album", especially since most of them might not have ever seen an "LP". Or a "45" for that matter. :)
 
Messages
10,765
Location
My mother's basement
Most of the under 50s I know are very much into "vinyls," which is a term that makes my skin crawl, so I'd suspect that even if they haven't heard the term they could figure it out pretty quick.

Now if only the term "vinyls" would disappeasr in my lifetime. Besides, I only have "shellacs."
At the annual Vintage Voltage Show, where vendors sell old hi-fi gear, mostly, was a fellow peddling old record albums. His sign said something like “LPs, $5 each, or $10 if you call them ‘vinyls.’”
 
Messages
17,020
Location
New York City
I thought this would kind of fit here.

While the word "burlesque" is slowly disappearing, when it is said today, it's pronounced as "burr -lesk," but when I hear it pronounced in movies from the '30s - '50s, it's often said as "bur-lee-kyoo."

Anyone have any idea how / why the pronunciation evolved as it did?
 

Monte

Practically Family
Messages
524
Location
North Dakota
I thought this would kind of fit here.

While the word "burlesque" is slowly disappearing, when it is said today, it's pronounced as "burr -lesk," but when I hear it pronounced in movies from the '30s - '50s, it's often said as "bur-lee-kyoo."

Anyone have any idea how / why the pronunciation evolved as it did?
I don't know. The latter seems to be a bad attempt at pronouncing a word you don't know how to sound out. Like niche is: neesh, not nitch.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,353
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
"Burlycue" was sort of insider slang, used by performers and theatre people, which made its way into the outsie world by means of the show biz press. Walter Winchell was particularly instrumental in spreading it.

It was primarily just a humorous shortening of the word BURLEsQue.

I have a good friend who did traditional burlesque in the 90s-00s, and that pronunciation was not widely used by that time. They called what they did "New Burlesque" to contrast what they did from the modern stripper-pole stuff.
 

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