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What's Gaelic for "Hey, might want to check your map"?

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A recent coastal wildfire in Ireland has bared a huge sign from the Second World War that had been covered up by thick undergrowth for around 70 years.

The sign, built on the land by whitewashed stones, was first spotted by a Garda unit (Irish Air Corps) who was on a flyover while helping firefighters put out the gorse blaze brought on by the hot weather on Ireland’s eastern coast.


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The Irish Times estimates that around 85 such signs were built around the coast of Ireland. Each sign was given a number. The number 8 can be faintly seen beside the recently discovered sign, located on Bray Head. The broken whitewashed stones set around the sign is reminiscent of a frame, also built to surround the wartime signal.

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According to the website Eire Markings, the signs were created in 1942 and 1943 by volunteers from local Look Out Posts (LOPs) to warn German and Allied airmen that they were passing over neutral territory.

https://nationalpost.com/news/wildf...nal-to-bomber-pilots-after-more-than-70-years

Related -

 

Edward

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Related -


Great little film - though to add to the figures given at the end, while the Irish Free State, as then was, went to great lengths to maintain its declared neutrality during WW2, it did secretly release all so-interned allied airmen during 1942/43. Luftwaffe boys were kept for the duration of the war, and many did indeed stay on in Ireland after the war rather than go home.
 

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Citations and links are good things.

As the war continued, K Lines expanded with the addition of 45 other German airmen and 47 more Allied airmen. Within each compound, the internees were allowed to have a bar in which the Army sold drink duty-free.

In October 1943 the Allied internees were moved to separate camp in Gormanston, Co Meath, and most were secretly freed. In a gesture towards the Germans, Mollenhauer and 19 of his colleagues were allowed to move to Dublin and enroll at University College, Dublin, or the College of Technology in Bolton Street. They stayed in groups of three or four in rented houses.

The Garda Special Branch kept an eye on the students and their contacts. People who rented them accommodation were investigated, and the Special Branch informed the Army that some of the men had amorous involvements with their Irish landladies.


https://www.irishexaminer.com/viewp...e-guests-in-ireland-not-prisoners-348940.html
 

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Wolfe found himself heading not back to his airbase, RAF Eglinton, now City of Derry Airport, in Northern Ireland just 13 miles away, but to Curragh Camp, County Kildare, 175 miles to the south.

Here, a huddle of corrugated iron huts housed 40 other RAF pilots and crewmen who had accidentally come down in neutral territory. They were effectively prisoners of war.

It was an odd existence. The guards had blank rounds in their rifles, visitors were permitted (one officer shipped his wife over), and the internees were allowed to come and go. Fishing excursions, fox hunting, golf and trips to the pub in the town of Naas helped pass the time.

But what was really odd was the proximity of the Germans.


https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-13924720
 

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Disorientated as they emerged from their wreck, they thought they were close to their Scottish base. Spotting a pub, they decided to celebrate their survival but when they entered the saloon bar they found it full of Germans in Nazi uniforms who shouted at them to “go to their own bar”. The Nazis pointed at the public bar which turned out to be full of Allied men.

To the Canadians it seemed as if they had fallen down a rabbit hole and emerged in some kind of Wonderland where the Second World War had been reduced to a minor rivalry about which side of a pub to sit in. What they had actually discovered were the inmates of the Curragh, a prisoner of war camp that has been described as “Colditz meets Father Ted”.


https://www.express.co.uk/expressyourself/255828/The-Cushiest-PoW-camp
 

31 Model A

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While living in Wicklow, County Wicklow from 2002 to 2006, Wicklow Head was not that far from me, a short walk from town put me at Wicklow Head where I was told there was one of these WWII warnings was. Everytime I took my dog out there for exercise, I'd look for remains of it. I never did locate it. Maybe that was because it was already gone and no one cared to tell the yank.

Wicklow Head Lighthouse. Wicklow Town is just out of the photo, center top.

8203628290_626a8b8edf_z.jpg
 

Just Jim

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A friend told me once about getting shot-up on a run over Germany, then getting lost. They finally sighted land, and some writing that appeared to say "FIRE". I always wondered if he was pulling my leg, but I can see how at first glance one could mis-read it.
 

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Hey, b'fhéidir gur mhaith leat do léarscáil a sheiceáil

That would how to say it in Irish.
Google Translate gave me more-or-less the same.

D'fhéadfadh "Hey, gur mhaith leat do léarscáil a sheiceáil"?
 

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