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Your Favorite Paintings

DesertDan

One Too Many
Messages
1,582
Location
Arizona
I am not very sophisticated when it comes to art and enjoy many different things. But I most enjoy science-fiction and fantasy themed art especially the works of Frank Frazetta, Greg & Tim Hildebrant, Mobius, Steven Foss and similar artists.

Another fave is Stephen Morath. His work is deceptively simplistic and whimsical, but if one has spent time living in southern Arizona one realizes how well he captures the essence of the area and it's culture.
 

DNO

One Too Many
Messages
1,815
Location
Toronto, Canada
Pretty well any portrait by Canadian artist Fred Varley.

Screenshot2012-10-24at32414PM.png
 

Flicka

One Too Many
Messages
1,165
Location
Sweden
a painter who i think many here won't have heard of: Anne Magill. she was born in Northern Ireland and currently lives in East Sussex.

I love those! Especially the first.

I come from an art dealer family and that has just given me a weird relation to art -- there was always an endless supply of paintings - just rummage through the storage and see what you like, sort of, and most of the art we had was made by people we knew. Anyway, as a kid I really loved horses and so I loved the pictures of a Polish artist called Jerzy Portrzebowski who my grandfather sold quite a lot by. He was a family friend and even periodically lived with my father's family and painted all of them, who painted lots of very naturalistic horses which was just my thing at 7.

It wasn't until I was an adult that I found out that he spent part of the war in Buchenwald and Auschwitz and that he did some horribly dark stuff too. He is represented at the museum at Auschwitz as he drew a lot during his time there (it was a useful survival skill), and while I still rather love his horses for sentimental reasons, I find his Auschwitz drawings horribly poignant; more so than photos of the camps almost. I'm not going to post any of them here, but if anyone is interested a quick google search for his name and Auschwitz will bring them up (but brace yourself). My mother also has some charming and simple still-life water colours he made in my grandfather's summer house that I am eying enviously. He had a great talent that he didn't put to anything near good enough use, just put out trivial stuff (aka horse pictures) to pay the bills. It was a waste, IMO.
 

DNO

One Too Many
Messages
1,815
Location
Toronto, Canada
I love those! Especially the first.

I come from an art dealer family and that has just given me a weird relation to art -- there was always an endless supply of paintings - just rummage through the storage and see what you like, sort of, and most of the art we had was made by people we knew. Anyway, as a kid I really loved horses and so I loved the pictures of a Polish artist called Jerzy Portrzebowski who my grandfather sold quite a lot by. He was a family friend and even periodically lived with my father's family and painted all of them, who painted lots of very naturalistic horses which was just my thing at 7.

It wasn't until I was an adult that I found out that he spent part of the war in Buchenwald and Auschwitz and that he did some horribly dark stuff too. He is represented at the museum at Auschwitz as he drew a lot during his time there (it was a useful survival skill), and while I still rather love his horses for sentimental reasons, I find his Auschwitz drawings horribly poignant; more so than photos of the camps almost. I'm not going to post any of them here, but if anyone is interested a quick google search for his name and Auschwitz will bring them up (but brace yourself). My mother also has some charming and simple still-life water colours he made in my grandfather's summer house that I am eying enviously. He had a great talent that he didn't put to anything near good enough use, just put out trivial stuff (aka horse pictures) to pay the bills. It was a waste, IMO.

Aba Bayefsky was a young Canadian artist who enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War. Being an artist, he ended up assigned to the RCAF Historical Section as an official war artist. Late in the war, he was sent to the newly liberated Belsen concentration camp to "record what he saw". He did, and he produced some very disturbing images. Though in the possession of the Canadian War Museum, they are rarely exhibited due to their disturbing nature. Some are availabe online. It was a deeply profound experience for the young artist and it shaped Bayefsky's art for the rest of his life.
 
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TM

A-List Customer
Messages
309
Location
California Central Coast
The Expectation (Richard Oelze - 1935)

Oelze_Expectation-21.jpg


This one seems to be a premonition of the writings of J. G. Ballard.

This is a great thread! Art is very personal and must resonate with the viewer, one way or the other.

Tony
 

vitanola

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,254
Location
Gopher Prairie, MI
vitanola, I hope you don't mind that I registered here to speak with you about Paul Doering. He was my great-grandfather and my family is always on the lookout for his works. He was not actually Dutch, although that is frequently reported on the internet. He was actually born in Germany and was apprenticed at the Meissen china factory in Dresden. We own a small watercolor which he painted while in Dresden -- the family story is that it was his 'final exam' before leaving his apprenticeship. It's a cool little painting of a cherub riding on a carrot, believe it or not. Anyway, he married a fellow apprentice there and they came to the US in the 1880s. Daddy Paul (as he was known to my mother) started his US career as an instructor at the Art Institute of Cincinnati, then did a lot of traveling before coming to California in the early 1900s. He did a lot of portraits -- his obituary mentioned portraits of former US President Benjamin Harrison and former confederate President . He also did a lovely watercolor portrait of actor Richard Bennett (father of Constance & Joan).

His son, my grandfather, married and had children very late -- he was in his 50s when my mother was born. My mom was 9 or 10 when Daddy Paul died and we only ended up with a couple of paintings -- the watercolor I mentioned before, plus the Bennett portrait (which I lost track of after the death of my uncle, unfortunately -- I'd love to have that one back!), and an oil of Laguna Beach. We've managed to pick up a few more pieces in the last few years, thanks to the internet. I'd love to see some photos of your other Paul Doering works, if you wouldn't mind.

Please pardon me. I've not been following this thread. I will try to get some pictures posted the next time that I get back home.
 

herringbonekid

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,016
Location
East Sussex, England
my favourite living artist is the German Neo Rauch, born Leipzig 1960. his work is filled with imagery that seems to refer to the former GDR (and other historical periods) but seen as if in a disjointed dreamscape:

neo_rauch_5_zpsd877147b.jpg


neo_rauch_3_zps7440fe64.jpeg


neo_rauch_1_zpsf77e5c08.jpg


neo_rauch_2_zpsa0cee52a.jpg


does anyone else like any contemporary artists ?
 
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Metatron

One Too Many
Messages
1,536
Location
United Kingdom
You all have good taste, I like most of the paintings in this thread.
HBK, it's funny, the artist is contemporary but his work looks like good old fashioned surrealism.
Personally I enjoy a bit of Giger.

Here are some of my favourites:

Mystery and Melancholy of a street, Giorgio de Chirico


Isle of the dead, Arnold Böcklin


Temptation of Saint Anthony, Max Ernst




Water, Guiseppe Arciboldo

And something a bit sillier, The death dealer, Frank Frazetta
 
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herringbonekid

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,016
Location
East Sussex, England
Metatron, that Bocklin painting is one of my favourites, and i'm also a fan of surrealism generally, particularly Magritte, who Neo Rauch has been called 'the modern version of'.
... he resists the categorisation, and i personally think he's gone further than any of the old fashioned surrealists did in terms of mining his own personal dream world and also in the sheer scale and output.
 

Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202

I do remember that one, back in the 70s! I have never played Dungeons & Dragons, or any other roll playing game for that matter, but I do remember checking out the cover of the latest issue, back then, just for the great art work. Some where, I have an issue, where the cover has a Fat Dragon at the bottom of a pit, with Knights armour and skeletons all around him, and he is picking his teeth with a sword. Love the humour in that painting!
 

Matt Crunk

One Too Many
Messages
1,029
Location
Muscle Shoals, Alabama
As a lifelong student of art, it's hard to pick a favorite painting. But my favorite artist(s), and the biggest influence on my own style, would have to be the Wyeths. Andrew in particular.
Here is Andy Wyeth's "Helga" portrait beside a portrait I did of my own mother. See any influence?

1452081_10153457024520077_752970291_n.jpg


and his "Weatherside" along with my "Weathered Side":

935141_10153457025090077_1359945450_n.jpg
 
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