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What Was The Last Radio Program You Heard?

Discussion in 'Radio' started by LizzieMaine, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. Brother Dave will appreciate this one -- the November 18, 1939 edition of the Prince Albert Grand Ol' Opry. Roy Acuff has just performed "When Our Old Age Pension Check Comes To Our Door," a comedy song about Social Security. I wonder if, when his own Old Age Pension Check arrived at his door in 1968, if he did in fact put his flapper on the shelf and get a grandma for hisself?
     
  2. 52Styleline

    52Styleline A-List Customer

    "Men at Sea, Story of a Convoy" 7-11-1943
     
  3. Wire9Vintage

    Wire9Vintage A-List Customer

    I'm loving The Magnificent Montague right now! A radio show in a radio show? Too funny
     
  4. If it's 1 o'clock in the afternoon it must be "Matinee with Bob and Ray," the WHDH series that got the two comedians started. Today's broadcast, from August 31, 1948 finds Bob Elliot and musicians Bill Green and Ken Wilson all off on vacation. So the program is introduced as "Matinee With Ray," to the accompaniment of recorded music. Ray Goulding does his best impression of Henry Morgan in keeping the half hour going until it's time for the ball game to come on.
     
  5. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

  6. Miss Moonlight

    Miss Moonlight A-List Customer

    Tonight while I made dinner, it was Fibber McGee and Molly time. "Cutting Down Fibber's Old Suit For Molly." January 5, 1943.
     
  7. Miss Moonlight

    Miss Moonlight A-List Customer

    Although I've several hundred old radio eps on mp3 on my phone, I often use this OTR app. I love it. This is the last show I listened to.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Eating breakfast to the accompaniment of a talk from 12/31/42 by Paul O'Leary of the Office of Price Administration on the coming implementation of point rationing on processed foods. He is questioned by actors representing Mr. and Mrs. America and explains the complex system about to be introduced to ensure that everyone gets their fair share of canned and manufactured foods -- but no more than that. The discussion of ration chiselers is refreshingly blunt: some people in this war are making *real* sacrifices, and no American has any right to whine about the petty inconveniences rationing will bring. Or, in other words, if you can't get your canned peaches when you want them, too bad. You'll get apricots and like it.
     
  9. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Chicago Cubs vs Oakland A's; 670* AM last nite. Chapman closed it down.:D
     
  10. Thursday night at 10pm means it's time for the Kraft Music Hall, and I'm looking forward to a very entertaining sixty minutes -- Bing Crosby's guests for the program of April 16, 1942 are Warner Bros. star Ronald "Reegan," Spike Jones and his City Slickers, and Sabu the Elephant Boy. That's got to be the epitome of something, but I couldn't begin to tell you what.
     
  11. Preserving a set of aluminum discs containing excerpts from the June 19, 1932 broadcast of "Our American Schools," an NBC public-service feature presented by the National Education Association. NEA President Florence Hale, a Maine native with the accent to prove it, outlines the upcoming program of the 1932 NEA convention in Atlantic City, which will include a presentation on "The Cause and Cure of Human Stupidity," which Mrs. Hale notes will be of particular interest to school board members. The featured topic of the broadcast is the decline of physical education instruction in public schools due to Depression-induced budget cuts, with Dr. Charl O. Williams pointing out that three quarters of all American public school students currently suffer from some physical defect which compromises their ability to learn. Speaker Lyle W. Ashby adds that over thirty percent of all rural schools in 1932 have eliminated all health instruction, as well as school doctors and nurses -- in many cases eiiminating the only source of health care available to the pupils.

    Fortunately, of course, all these problems have been solved today.
     
    Julian Shellhammer likes this.
  12. Edward G. Robinson, Gail Patrick and Laird Cregar in The Maltese Falcon, Lux Radio Theatre
    Originally transmitted February 8, 1943

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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2016
  13. Since I let my subscription to Sirius lapse (I used o listen to the Radio Classics channel all the time), it was probably a downloaded episode (on my Ipod) of Bogart and Bacall's Bold Venture show. Either that or Johnny Dollar.
     
  14. 52Styleline

    52Styleline A-List Customer

    The Ginny Simms Show 12/28/45 guest: Frank Sinatra
     
  15. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer One of the Regulars

    282
    The Cinnamon Bear, from 1937. For those who don't know, the program was designed to be an advertising tie-in, syndicated for broadcast from Thanksgiving to Christmas. The episodes I'm listening to have about one minute of music as intro and outro, probably so local announcers could supply hometown information. If you google the show, the cast is impressive, with Gale Gordon, Hanley Stafford, Joseph Kearns, and so on. Elliot Lewis as Mr. Presto the Magician has this non-stop delivery of his lines, like a truck with no brakes.
     
  16. Yup, that show was produced by a company called Transco, based in Hollywood. Their dramatic director, Lindsay MacHarrie, was also the dramatic director of the Don Lee Network, and most of the actors who worked there got in their share of moonlighting time working on Transco programs.
     
  17. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Radio Swiss Jazz. :)
     
  18. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer One of the Regulars

    282
    As mentioned on the Pat Novak, For Hire thread, PNFH, The Jack of Clubs. Raymond Burr as Inspector Hellman projects barely-controlled rage and seems to want Novak in prison or dead. The tension between the two, expressed in the staccato insults and threats, is breath-taking.
     
  19. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer One of the Regulars

    282
    The Mysterious Traveler from January 30th, 1944, The House of Death.
     
  20. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer One of the Regulars

    282
    Pat Novak, For Hire, Go Away, Dixie Gillian. Complete with singing Gallenkamp's shoes commercial. Memorable tag: "You'll get more smiles to the Gallankamp's"
     

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