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Any thoughts on wrinkly horsehide

greenc

Familiar Face
Messages
79
Hi everyone,

Hope the week's off to a good start. I've found this RMC J100 and the horsehide looks like nothing I've seen before - very wrinkly, and you can tell still stiff in some spots.

Does anyone have any experience with hides that have done this?

Is this just a wrinkly hide or does it look like there was something done to it in the tanning process? Looking forward to everyone's thoughts, thank you.

Chris
 

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r0c1nant3

New in Town
Messages
25
First. I think that coat is bangin! But yeah, the arm stripes look brand new compared to the battered body. Still super dope IMHO.
 

MrProper

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,004
Location
Europe
That's very cool hide - do you know what causes that? Is that just luck of the draw with horsehide or is it treated to do that?
As far as I know, the leather is not specially treated like this. It has become more and more so after many wears. Of course, the jacket also got wet a few times and I wore it every day for a while. I would say I was just lucky with the hide.
 

greenc

Familiar Face
Messages
79
As far as I know, the leather is not specially treated like this. It has become more and more so after many wears. Of course, the jacket also got wet a few times and I wore it every day for a while. I would say I was just lucky with the hide.
Really a great looking bit of breaking in on yours, very cool. Thanks for responding, I appreciate that.
 

cbez

One Too Many
Messages
1,330
Location
CA
cool. sometimes tanning just looks like that. example this rainbow country now owned by TelemarkTumalo

 

AeroFan_07

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,482
Location
Iowa
At first glance, I thought the OP's jacket he was interested in had been baled.

Then I opened & zoomed in on the photos and WOW! That's impressive - nearly identical to Mr. Proper's CR. That's some very impressive creasing, way more than patina.
 

cbez

One Too Many
Messages
1,330
Location
CA
the japanese makers especially are always looking for ways to stand out and one up each other so they often chase stuff with more character.
 

Marc mndt

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,086
Is this just a wrinkly hide or does it look like there was something done to it in the tanning process?
Mushmans called it 'ragged leather' on their blog http://blog.mushmans.com/?eid=1923#gsc.tab=0. It involves selecting specific hides, shrinking them and in this case dying the leather in such a way that the wrinkles are highlighted. They explain it as follows :

"The name RUGGED means that it is rough or rough. And RAGGED (Ragged) = It means tattered or bumpy. It seems that it was called Ragdo in Japanese English.

In particular, it is often written as RUGGED LEAHTER, but personally, I feel that RAGGED LEATHER is more comfortable, so this leather is RAGGED LEATHER I'm going to write it as leather.

It's been so long, but if we easily put together the RAGGED LEATHER we tried this time, we will do the following to create a product.

1 Horsehide (horse leather) with many wrinkles is selected at the raw skin stage.

Perform processing that emphasizes wrinkles from 2.

3 Finish with a construction method that makes it even more uneven at the stage of tanning and dyeing.

4 At the time of cutting, cut so that the way the sheave enters is different for each part.

As mentioned above, this rug leather will be completed by taking 4 detours.

Of course, it is a vegetable tannin tan, so we promise you a wonderful change over time.

Rugded leather is made from the sorting of raw skin, and we select raw skins with a stronger texture.

Some people have a wrong perception of using the horse's abdomen, but the individual with intensely shorn is in the whole, not to mention the shoulder part.

After sorting these out, the base of the rug leather will be finished through a process that emphasizes the texture.

From here, we will further emphasize the fierceness by dyeing work.

This material is different from the rug leather at that time, and it is dyed with 100% aniline that does not use pigments (pigment).

We use several types of dyes on the base of natural color and dye them step by step. Normally, we will proceed while toning so that it will be uniform so that color shake does not occur, but do not dare to make excessive adjustments to the leather material this time. We are instructing you to color according to the material.

In addition, by wiping off the part sprayed with dye each time, the unevenness of the leather material is emphasized and produces a rough expression.

Applying the dyeing method implemented at last year's BUSTED SHRINK LEATHER, this leather material was completed.


IMG_0972.jpeg
 

Marc mndt

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,086
Another interesting thing I read on Mushmans blog...

Last month I was ridiculed for suggesting that a lot of the Japanese jackets are tailored to fit the Japanese customer, resulting in patterns that aren't necessarily suitable for the western physique.

IMG_0973.jpeg


On Mushman's blog they actually explain why they did just that, adjusting the original American patterns to fit "the average body shape of a Japanese".

The 50's leather jacket has a wide body and a short box silhouette.
In addition, the armhole is also thick, so if you wear it with the average body shape of a Japanese, you will inevitably feel "borrowed".

This model is reproduced by the excellent patterner of RAINBOW COUNTRY.
Shape around the waist and correction of the length. Also, a sophisticated pattern was completed by modifying the armhole.
If you push it too much and make it tight, the atmosphere will be damaged, so the taste of the 50's is a sense of size that modern Japanese can wear naturally.
 

Carlos840

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,944
Location
London
Another interesting thing I read on Mushmans blog...

Last month I was ridiculed for suggesting that a lot of the Japanese jackets are tailored to fit the Japanese customer, resulting in patterns that aren't necessarily suitable for the western physique.

View attachment 615865

On Mushman's blog they actually explain why they did just that, adjusting the original American patterns to fit "the average body shape of a Japanese".

The 50's leather jacket has a wide body and a short box silhouette.
In addition, the armhole is also thick, so if you wear it with the average body shape of a Japanese, you will inevitably feel "borrowed".

This model is reproduced by the excellent patterner of RAINBOW COUNTRY.
Shape around the waist and correction of the length. Also, a sophisticated pattern was completed by modifying the armhole.
If you push it too much and make it tight, the atmosphere will be damaged, so the taste of the 50's is a sense of size that modern Japanese can wear naturally.

It's not like anyone is taking what he says seriously....
 

greenc

Familiar Face
Messages
79
Mushmans called it 'ragged leather' on their blog http://blog.mushmans.com/?eid=1923#gsc.tab=0. It involves selecting specific hides, shrinking them and in this case dying the leather in such a way that the wrinkles are highlighted. They explain it as follows :

"The name RUGGED means that it is rough or rough. And RAGGED (Ragged) = It means tattered or bumpy. It seems that it was called Ragdo in Japanese English.

In particular, it is often written as RUGGED LEAHTER, but personally, I feel that RAGGED LEATHER is more comfortable, so this leather is RAGGED LEATHER I'm going to write it as leather.

It's been so long, but if we easily put together the RAGGED LEATHER we tried this time, we will do the following to create a product.

1 Horsehide (horse leather) with many wrinkles is selected at the raw skin stage.

Perform processing that emphasizes wrinkles from 2.

3 Finish with a construction method that makes it even more uneven at the stage of tanning and dyeing.

4 At the time of cutting, cut so that the way the sheave enters is different for each part.

As mentioned above, this rug leather will be completed by taking 4 detours.

Of course, it is a vegetable tannin tan, so we promise you a wonderful change over time.

Rugded leather is made from the sorting of raw skin, and we select raw skins with a stronger texture.

Some people have a wrong perception of using the horse's abdomen, but the individual with intensely shorn is in the whole, not to mention the shoulder part.

After sorting these out, the base of the rug leather will be finished through a process that emphasizes the texture.

From here, we will further emphasize the fierceness by dyeing work.

This material is different from the rug leather at that time, and it is dyed with 100% aniline that does not use pigments (pigment).

We use several types of dyes on the base of natural color and dye them step by step. Normally, we will proceed while toning so that it will be uniform so that color shake does not occur, but do not dare to make excessive adjustments to the leather material this time. We are instructing you to color according to the material.

In addition, by wiping off the part sprayed with dye each time, the unevenness of the leather material is emphasized and produces a rough expression.

Applying the dyeing method implemented at last year's BUSTED SHRINK LEATHER, this leather material was completed.


View attachment 615864
Thank you Marc, this is terrific information - I really love that some of these manufacturers step out every now and then looking for ways to do something a bit different. Great stuff Marc!
 

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