Being called by your first name at work

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Picard1138, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. Dr. Lucky

    Dr. Lucky New in Town

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Sacramento
    I'm in an in-house legal office in California and everyone is basically on a first name basis, within the legal office and throughout the rest of the organization. It isn't out of place for the most junior new employee to address attorneys, directors, or anyone else by just their first name. That may not be normal everywhere but I think that's definitely the culture in California. I'm certainly comfortable with it.

    Honestly, the only people that I don't like calling me by my first name are little kids. I try so hard to teach my daughter to address adults as Mr/Ms/Mrs but I swear every other kid expects to call adults by their first name (and it really galls me when their parents encourage my daughter to do the same).
     
  2. gear-guy

    gear-guy Practically Family

    Messages:
    962
    Location:
    southern indiana
    Welcome to the lounge Lucky
     
  3. Miss Sis

    Miss Sis One Too Many

    I'm a Nursery Nurse ( or 'Early Years Educator' as they sometimes like to call us these days) and work for an agency. The children almost always call staff by our first names, but in my previous position, had to call us 'Miss' or 'Mrs'. However, some of us chose to be Miss - First Name (even those who were married) rather than always use our surname. It was our choice.

    I chose to be Miss Simone (first name) as when I first went as agency staff, one of the older children asked me my name, and I unaware that they had to use titles, had told them my first name. I didn't want to confuse them so I stuck with it. Grew to really like it.

    In fact the funny thing is that the adults usually ended up calling each other Miss or Mrs So and So out of work too! So my friends would walk into the bar or restaurant and say 'Hello Miss Simone!'.
     
  4. Dr. Lucky

    Dr. Lucky New in Town

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Thanks for the warm welcome! I've been lurking here for too long without contributing. I finally registered to contact someone in Classifieds - I figure I may as well start posting too.
     
  5. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,206
    As some one who was blessed with a last name that runs out of boxes on most government forms, I go by my first name. It is a little shocking, when some one uses my last name, and even more shocking, when they pronounce it correctly!
     
  6. Some Random Bloke

    Some Random Bloke New in Town

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    In Australia it's pretty rare to use last names. School kids do with their teachers, and parents might to their kids teachers because they don't know their first name and are just in the habit of talking that way with their kids. In my industry we usually begin conversations with new clients by their last name but usually we wind up on first name basis quickly and that's how we introduce ourselves. I've taught in a small college (I have a masters but there were doctors there) and it was always first names from the principal down.
     
  7. Mickey85

    Mickey85 New in Town

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Indiana
    I work in a psychiatric residential for kids, they use our first names for our privacy. Theoretically, they don't know our last names so that when they get out, they have a hard time finding us by phone, address, facebook, etc. In truth, they know most of our last names because its on the paperwork. Most of them calm the techs by their first name only. The teachers and therapists are given their job as a surname, so for instance, I'm teacher Matt, there's a therapist Karen, etc. The supervisors and admin are given titles. Chris the supervisor, mike the CEO, etc. I went back to a public school for a brief hiatus to help teach the teachers about working with psych kids in their classrooms, and it was very weird to be called by my last name.
     
  8. All the neighbor kids and kids of my friends call me "Mr. Matt". I'd never thought of this as a Southern thing, I guess I assumed it was everywhere. But seeing as how I've never lived anywhere *but* the South, perhaps it is.
     
  9. cchgn

    cchgn One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    159
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    Uhhh, that's a Marine Corp base he's talking about. The Army and Marines have different protocols,,,,just sayin'( 8 yr Marine here).

    A Marine motioning a person thru the gate could be misconstrued ( by the casual non-obesrver) to be a salute, when in fact, it isn't. AFA Marine protocol, they'll salute civilians and retired Marines as well, out of respect.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2014
  10. Bugguy

    Bugguy A-List Customer

    Messages:
    401
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    You bring back a memory... I once was helping the wife of one of our patients and she always referred to her husband as The Colonel. Not my husband (he was passing at the time, so it was pretty emotional), not Jack; but always The Colonel. Obviously he was in the military his whole life and that I guess shaped her as well. As this was important to her, we always discussed his condition in that form. Even in the hospital it was Colonel or Sir. At the time I thought it was odd, but with age and the loss of loved ones, maybe this helped her cope - this was her discipline.
     
  11. Picard1138

    Picard1138 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Regardless of branch, the driver of a vehicle in motion is not required to salute.

    -Max
     
  12. hatguy1

    hatguy1 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,145
    Location:
    Da Pairee of da prairee
    I don't mind it as much from one level to the next. But I think it sounds cheesy, false and insipid when first level supervisors etc start talking about CEOS by first name (as in I have a meeting with Bill as in Bill Gates like they're truly on a 1st name basis with the CEO) or when addressing them from the floor of an all-hands meeting by first name. Again, it just smacks of ridiculous to me. I don't think there's anything wrong with showing that level some respect of addressing as Me or Mrs or miss.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. hatguy1

    hatguy1 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,145
    Location:
    Da Pairee of da prairee
    One thing I don't like is when coworkers or supervisors call me by last name only. I've always found that discourteous.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. Sapphire

    Sapphire One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    Europe
    I am working in the aviation sector in a company with more than 1500 employees. We got more than 30 nationalities and the official language is (some mix of) English with lots of regional influences. We are on first name basis from the apprentice up to the CEO, which helps maintaining a closely-knit spirit of cooperation throughout the company. The company often has the atmosphere of a family-run business even though we are in the Top 10 worldwide in our industry. Perfectly happy with that.

    On the other hand I also work as guest lecturer at a university, where the students address me as "Professor Sapphire". This feels quite odd as a) at my UK university we were on first name basis with the profs - which might have been due to the fact that we were mainly part-time postgrads of a certain age and b) I didn't get beyond the MSc level myself - and in my home country, a Professor is higher-ranked than a PhD... My PhD is only planned for the time after retirement - too much work at the moment ;)
     
  15. Gin&Tonics

    Gin&Tonics Practically Family

    Messages:
    899
    Location:
    The outer frontier
    Being in law enforcement, most folks tend to call each other by their last names only, or sometimes we address each other as "officer." If you're friends with the person you might call them by their first name.
     
  16. Stray Cat

    Stray Cat My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I work in a governmental office.
    In the ideal case, I'd prefer people to be polite and call me by Madam (and most of the population do, when they address me). It is my co-workers that fail to do so - I suppose they feel no need to keep the polite distance and call me by my last name. Ever since I came into the office, everyone calls me (and everyone else) by the first names only.
    Not only by my first name. :doh:
    The truth is, nowadays they are making up short and sweet nicknames... only I do not find them sweet at all, more over: I find some of the name variations quite offensive. But the ladies at the office think it's "cute".
    Callin' me "kid" is NOT by far cute.. it is plain rude. :nono:
     
  17. newsman

    newsman One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    183
    Location:
    Florida
    Same here. Further more...I don't go by my real first name. I've not used in professionally or personally for over 25 years.

    I have had several nick names over the years and some of stuck.

    Toe tag was one. That's a long story
     
  18. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,206
    I wish some one would call me "kid!"
     
  19. Stray Cat

    Stray Cat My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Let's trade. :D
     
  20. skydog757

    skydog757 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    461
    Location:
    Thumb Area, Michigan
    That is my experience also, however I work in Correctioins. We always use last names in the presence of inmates; when it's just the rank and file we go with first or last as the mood strikes. Administrative are always addressed by title (Sheriff, Undersheriff, Lieutenant) or Sir/Mame (I hate calling a woman "Mame" so I usually do it by their rank). Judges are always "Judge X_____" or "Your Honor" whatever the circumstance. Inmates are always last name (Mr. or Ms.) no matter how well you know them.
     

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