Hasidic Jewish hats

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Lotsahats, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. Lotsahats

    Lotsahats One Too Many

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    Werner Cohen's site is fantastic. I love it.

    For number 2, it'll vary by community. I can't recall non-bound edges off the top of my head, but that's not to say they're not worn.

    The answers for 1 and 3 kind of fit under one response: No, it's not a written law per se. Clothing choice falls under a general rule about modesty in dress and behavior, however, so the choice of dark clothing reflects a conservative attitude toward those things. You dress the way you do in order to be part of the community, to not stand out in an immodest way, and so you don't need it written down. It's just all around you. That's not to say that people don't "show off" in one way or another: a really nice hat, for instance, or custom-tailored clothing, and if you look at some of the clothing Orthodox women wear, you can see that while it's conservative, there is a lot of style and fashion there.

    Quite right about 4. You can find pictures into the 70s and 80s of men wearing the stingiest of brims for their black fedoras, so some of that style does come and go. For Hasidim, your clothing choices will reflect what the leader of your community wears, so when the Lubavitcher Rebbe, for instance, started wearing wider brimmed hats, his Hasidim started following suit.
     
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  2. H Weinstein

    H Weinstein One of the Regulars

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    Thanks for that info. Saw lots of those black fedoras, especially, when I worked in mid-town Manhattan, near the Diamond and Garment Districts.

    I actually am Jewish (though not religious at all), but when I converted one of my black western Akubras into a fedora, my first thought was: "I look like an Orthodox Jew!" I decided the look wasn't for me, so the hat went back to western.

    Also reminds me of two movies featuring hat culture-confusion scenes: 1) THE FRISCO KID (from '79, I think), starring Gene Wilder as a rabbi from eastern Europe making a cross-country trip in the late 1800s, with Harrison Ford as the cowboy helping him get there safely. There's a scene where Gene Wilder's character see Amish farmers and thinks they're Chasidic Jews. 2) In WITNESS (1985?), oddly also starring Harrison Ford, there's a scene where a little Amish boy sees Chasidic Jews in the Philly train station and mistakes them for Amish.
     
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  3. Lotsahats

    Lotsahats One Too Many

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    A sincere compliment given sincerely would probably be taken the right way. I imagine you might get a "Thanks" in reply, and if you're wesring a hat, too, maybe even a conversation.
     
  4. g.durand

    g.durand One Too Many

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    Aaron, thanks for starting the thread. The insights into the hat-wearing habits of Orthodox and Ultra-Orthodox Jews is a nice addition to the knowledge base here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2015
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  5. moontheloon

    moontheloon I'll Lock Up

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    I have been asked by outsiders and Orthodox

    then again I have also been asked by Indian men if I am Sikh

    these are all multiple occasions

    anyway... such a really info packed thread ... thank you so much
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2015
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  6. Genuine Classic Gangster

    Genuine Classic Gangster One of the Regulars

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    I am not Jewish or Amish, but wearing fedoras and overcoats causes me to get asked "Are you a Jew?" or "Are you Amish?" at least a few times every winter. That's happened to me while I was wearing black fedoras, brown fedoras, navy fedoras and green fedoras. A lot more people than a few probably thought I was a Jew in their minds than who have actually spoken up about it to me.

    Therefore, I presume that many people in the general public stereotype all fedora wearers today as Jews because they assume that fedora wearing is now something that only Jews do.
     
  7. Daniele Tanto

    Daniele Tanto Call Me a Cab

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    Location:
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    Many thanks for your comprehensive and accurate description of the headgear worn by Hasidic.
    I have finally seen and almost completely understood the meaning of hats that here in Italy, where the Jewish communities are small and fully integrated into the italian costumes, it's hard to understand.
    Thanks to Charlie for the link that exemplifies even more meanings of the Jews hats.
    My only European experience was in Antwerp where, in the diamond district I saw, a few years ago, a number of hats that were similar or identical to those that have graciously shown.
    In Italy they are really rare. Thanks Aaron
     
  8. [​IMG]
    In my neck of the woods, black hat and beard are more likely to be mistaken as "Amish".

    Thanks for the tutorial Aaron. I, like others here enjoy learning about other cultures, religions, customs. If hat wearing is involved, even more so...o_O
     
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  9. philosophy101

    philosophy101 A-List Customer

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    I've always wondered why the custom amongst orthodox Jews who wear fedoras seems to be to wear it very high on the head. It looks as if they fit their hats one or even two sizes smaller than is typical amongst non-orthodox fedora wearers. Any insight into this, Aaron?
     
  10. suitedcboy

    suitedcboy One Too Many

    With a touch of flanging you could pass the Amish hats off as Nevada Basin Buckaroo headgear.

    Love this insight into these niches of the hat wearing world.
     
    hatsRme likes this.
  11. And different Amish sects wear their hats differently. For instance, in my pic above, they are wearing a telescope crease. In my area, the hats more resemble a black BOTP with a rounded crown. Others use a center dent. I don't see many
    C-crown or diamond shapes, maybe they do those in other parts of the country.
     
  12. hatsRme

    hatsRme I'll Lock Up

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    You must be thinking of Shipshewana Shapes, Perry. They're Amish and Mennonite trendsetters around there!
     
  13. Shipshewana Shapers, our hats are Ship-shape!
     
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  14. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Often the hat is worn on top of the yarmulke, so it sits up high on the head. The ultra-Orthodox often wear both because one head covering is not considered holy enough.

    Also, when referring to more than one person, the word 'Hasidim' is used.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
  15. Bob Roberts

    Bob Roberts I'll Lock Up

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    I believe there is a hat vendor to the Jewish trade called "Yid Lids."
     
  16. -30-

    -30- A-List Customer

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    "The ultra-Orthodox often wear both because one head covering is not considered holy enough."
    scottyrocks.

    I don't think that you are wholly correct, in that the wearing of either/or both is just a sign of Religious Respect;
    when that hat is removed, the kipa remains.

    Regards,
    J T
     
  17. Lotsahats

    Lotsahats One Too Many

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    You know, I'd say it's just the way the custom of hat-wearing has worked out in these communities. The young man wears his hat higher on his head because that's the way his father wears it, and so on.

    Wearing a hat over a kippah is a holdout to a time when a modestly-dressed man wouldn't be seen in public without a hat; thus one wears a kippah out of fear of Heaven, and one wears the hat to be modest. For some groups, a double head-covering is required during prayer, and the hat can assist with this--but the prayer shawl can also be pulled over the head like a hood, accomplishing the same. Let me repeat: we're talking about the habits of only a small percentage of American Jews.

    Quite right, Scotty: Hasid and Hasidim--as long as they are Hasidic. Otherwise, Jew and Jews works fine for anyone who is Jewish. :)

    Cheers,
    A
     
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  18. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Well, this was one of the explanations given to me when I was studying with an orthodox organization. It seems logical there are other reasons, as well.
     
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  19. Joshua London

    Joshua London New in Town

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    I happily stumbled across this old thread. I know it’s been nearly half a decade, but if Aaron is still active on this forum, I’d love to know: which style of Borsalino fedora are you wearing in that photo?
     
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  20. deadlyhandsome

    deadlyhandsome I'll Lock Up

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    I don’t know that Aaron is still active here.

    I have several similar (black, wide brim, made for the religious market) Borsalinos of recent manufacture:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
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