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(KNIVES) Let's see some sharp pointy objects

bulldog1935

Suspended
Messages
232
Location
downtown Bulverde, Texas
well let's see it, and we'll tell you...

and since we need a gratuitous knife photo on this page
gamegetter-1-1.jpg

I do have one of these, and with the bone handle and blade etching is a much prettier knife than this photo shows

along with another limited Marbles, this one for Smokey Mountain Knife Works
bladesmn.jpg
 
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Hunter_aka_Scotty

One of the Regulars
Messages
147
Location
State of Jefferson
Just mistakenly posted this some where else... DERP!

This is my favorite knife. A custom made Scottish early to mid 18th century dirk. Actual Scottish bog oak was used to make the handle. Bog oak takes hundreds of years to cure to this state.
BayonetampDirk020.jpg


The clan Cameron motto is etched into the blade: "Aonaibh Ri Chéile" which means "Let us unite."
BayonetampDirk024.jpg


Detail on the hand carved handle.
BayonetampDirk023.jpg
 
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andy richards

Practically Family
Messages
647
Location
The Netherlands
Nice photographs guys!

Here my Dutch East Indies Army (Koninklijk Nederlandsch Indisch Leger - KNIL) Klewang.
There were several variations of the cutlass model fighting sabres from the late 1800's until 1942...
All models looks the same, some differs in handgrip, scabbard and pommel.
First models were maby by the Dutch Army facilities at Hembrug, some in Solingen, Germany, some in the East Indies (now Indonesia) and a few thousands in the USA (Vince and Milsco).
This example is made by Milsco and was made in early 1940 as supplies from The Netherlands were cut-off beacause of the German occupation.
These sabres were not for ceremonial duties... Used as true weapons during the Dutch colonial period in the far east. Even used up to the 60's during the New Guinnea conflict.

P1100721.jpg


Milsco1.jpg


Almost same models were used in the US Navy (model USN Cutlass).

Cheers,
Andy
 
Messages
13,349
Location
Orange County, CA
With the navy being the most tradition-bound of all the armed services it's not surprising that in many navies cutlass drill was still considered an integral part of naval training well into the early twentieth century.

In my opinion one of the most interesting fighting knives is the Argentine commando knife with its cutlass-like hilt.

yarara-paracaidista.jpg
 

1961MJS

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,362
Location
Norman Oklahoma
Hi

Of all of the swords through time, the Cutlass and Patton's sword are the two I think I would find useful carrying. The cutlass is probably as good a tool as a weapon.

Just my $0.02 and not worth that really.
 

randooch

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,869
Location
Ukiah, California
Here's a knife I made under the guidance of an 89 year old man, using his tools in his shop. He had about five sanders set up, each with a different grit, and another five motors, two buffing wheels on each.
The wheels were charged with a series of polishing compounds, coarse to fine.

It took over 4 hours start to finish, including cutting the steel blank, the grenadillo grips, and the brass tang. Mostly, though, I remember standing in front of grinders, sanders, and polishers for what seemed like a minor eternity.

A very memorable afternoon.

imageebf.jpg


He called it a "skinning knife." I put it to work now and then skinning vegetables and fruits on road trips.
imagepnch.jpg


Thanks for lookin'! :)
 

Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
Not the prettiest knife shown hear, but it gets the job done. I bought the blank over 30 years ago and made the handle my self, it's from a Juniper bush. It is extremely hard wood, I sanded it with a power sander and 60 grit paper, at the point you see it now, the new paper only burnished the wood. I have seen sparks coming off chainsaw while cutting these bushes, high silica. As you can see, the knife resides on the back side of my Posable Bag, a jack of all trades. I forgot to add, there is no finish on the handle, just natural patina!
Knife2.jpg
Knife4.jpg
 
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randooch

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,869
Location
Ukiah, California
Nice work, Stearmen. I've never worked with juniper, but considering its environs, I'm not surprised by the mineral hardness you describe.

Did you make the bag?
 

Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
Nice work, Stearmen. I've never worked with juniper, but considering its environs, I'm not surprised by the mineral hardness you describe.

Did you make the bag?
Some one had started it, I just finished it. I didn't bother to square off the back pouch, works better that way as it turned out.
 

mikespens

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,913
Location
Tacoma, Wa
Here's a knife I made under the guidance of an 89 year old man, using his tools in his shop. He had about five sanders set up, each with a different grit, and another five motors, two buffing wheels on each.
The wheels were charged with a series of polishing compounds, coarse to fine.

It took over 4 hours start to finish, including cutting the steel blank, the grenadillo grips, and the brass tang. Mostly, though, I remember standing in front of grinders, sanders, and polishers for what seemed like a minor eternity.

A very memorable afternoon.

imageebf.jpg


Thanks for lookin'! :)

Hey Randall do you recall the old timers name? Are you a member of the OKCA?
 

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