Last surviving member of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade dies at age 100

Discussion in 'WWII' started by Tiki Tom, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Interesting article. I'm sometimes surprised at how controversial the topic remains even all these many decades later. But ---keeping politics out of it--- I agree with the articles statement that "Decades after the Spanish Civil War, the volunteers who fought alongside the Republicans retained a certain romantic appeal, fueled in part by their depiction in works such as Ernest Hemingway’s novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls.”" Something about the way the Spanish Civil War was a dress rehearsal for WWII makes the whole story heartbreaking and romantic in a certain "lost cause" sort of way. It was certainly an important part of the 1930s and the run up to war. R.I.P.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...?hpid=hp_hp-cards_hp-card-world:homepage/card
     
  2. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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    Sad news! Something to remember, the Americans that served in Spain, were integrated a full decade before the U.S. military. Interesting that he served in the Pacific during WWII. As a kid, I was told all of them were Black Listed and barred from service, just propaganda I guise. Albert Baumler flew for the Republicans, then tried to join the Flying Tigers, he was to late, but did join the AAF and fly with Chennault and the 23rd FG. Adding four more kills to the 4.5 kills over Spain, the first American to have both German and Japanese kills to his credit.
     
  3. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    I have never heard about Albert Baumler. I will google him. Thanks. I first became interested in the complex, sad history of the Spanish Civil War and especially in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade after reading the Hemingway biography by Carlos Baker. Then I went on to read Hemingway's "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and also "Man's Hope" by Andre Malraux. Also "Wide is the Gate" by Upton Sinclair was an early influence. (If you aren't familiar with Upton Sinclair's Lanny Budd series ---most aren't--- it might worth a look. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/22/books/revisit-to-old-hero-finds-hes-still-lively.html?_r=0 )
     
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  4. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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  5. TREEMAN

    TREEMAN One Too Many

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    RIP...........
     
  6. BriarWolf

    BriarWolf One of the Regulars

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    The day had to come. No Pasaran.

     
  7. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Stearmen likes this.
  8. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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  9. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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