Looking at Bikes

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by mygar, Nov 11, 2018.

  1. lina

    lina A-List Customer

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Love the wheels...
     
    Winston Carter likes this.
  2. lina

    lina A-List Customer

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Washington DC
    20383301-F954-45E2-B8AB-E22A8EAC566A.jpeg Pretty happy with my new Triumph bobber. 1200 cc, but handles like a smaller bike.
     
  3. red devil

    red devil One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,571
    Location:
    London
    The Bonneville 1200 does as well, tried it a month ago, they got the feeling right :)
     
    mygar, Winston Carter and lina like this.
  4. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,688
    Location:
    Chicago
    Well since everybody is rubbing it in I'll just post some pics of my now totally neglected pile of bolts (900 cc ironhead Frankenstein)...built it in 2001 in my loft in the West Loop. Morris Magneto, S&S carb...was much more capable than the frame and chassis would allow. I had a honda shadow as well at the time, had two motorcycles in my living space (it was awesome) ...took me 1.5 years to finish. Rode it almost daily until about 2010, Kid came came along and now I'm scared...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    I grew up riding dirt bikes and smaller street bikes so when I was 18 got my first hog. It was a big step up and back then it was only kick start. About every 3 kicks they kick back. Even good engineer boots only lasted about a year before the shank was tore up.:):):)
     
    mygar likes this.
  6. mygar

    mygar A-List Customer

    Messages:
    327
    Wow now thats a chopper. I would dare say that probably would not be a good starter bike :)
     
    ton312 and Winston Carter like this.
  7. rolf s

    rolf s New in Town

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Norway
    JUst hop back on the horse so to speak. Its a cool bike, but maby a little hardcore
     
    Winston Carter likes this.
  8. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    20,075
    Location:
    London, UK
    The longer the snout, the harder they handle. THat's why Hopper's bike in Easy Rider was much less extreme than Fonda's - Fonda had experience as he rode a chopper himself, if memory serves.


    Lovely - first of these I've seen in the wild. More bike than I'll ever need (or want to insure at UK prices!), BUT if the silly-big lottery win came in, I'd still be first in the queue! Clever move by Triumph to get into this style as a production bike. The next zeitgeist they need to jump on - though by this point it's more of a bandwagon, really - is the smaller bike. A reissued TigerCub would go down a storm in today's European / UK market, imo.

    JInkies - looks like you'd need a week's notice to corner that! ;) Impressive stuff. I'm sure that enginecalone would make a nice feature (glass top, lovely coffee table.... ;) ).
     
  9. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,688
    Location:
    Chicago
    Actually turns weren't as bad as you'd think. It actually cornered pretty well. The full stop 90 degree turns weren't fun. I'd always wait for the green light. Wasn't terribly easy to get up to speed out of a 90 and in this town, the cabbies and angry city drivers just don't play. If I ever build anything again it'll be a slammed CB750 Cafe racer with rear set pegs and clubmans. And brakes on both sets of wheels!
     
    davyjones007 and Edward like this.
  10. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    I have ridden plenty of hard tail frames with 10 over tubes and springer front ends, no front brake. Looking back they were death traps. It's a young man's bike. They are uncomfortable, ride hard, steer terrible. The only good thing about them other than looks is the low center of gravity.
     
    LeFonque and ton312 like this.
  11. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,688
    Location:
    Chicago
    Agreed. Rigid frames will cripple you given enough time. The handling on a long bike is somewhat blown out of proportion though. Lake shore drive is curvy and I could carve it without noticing the length.
     
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  12. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    Like I said the low center of gravity is great. It makes an 500-600 lb. bike feel much lighter. That's the only good thing besides picking up chicks.:):)
     
    ton312 likes this.
  13. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    The name explains everything. "Chopper" You chop up a perfectly fine engineered MC and make a death trap.
     
  14. lina

    lina A-List Customer

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Yeah, I actually prefer the Bonnevilles before they all went to 1200, which is more than I really need. Not that it isn't nice to wind it out once in a while with power to spare, but I'd be happy to lose some weight off the bike and go with an 865cc.
     
  15. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    I will agree. The Bonneville 750 will make a fine first bike. They handle good, have a big enough motor for touring, and they are comfortable. I ruined a 72 Bonneville by putting it in a hard tail with 10 over tubes. Vibrated like crazy. It was a good handling bike before.
     
  16. lina

    lina A-List Customer

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Also, Moto Guzzi is making some nice 750s, which I think would make a fine first bike. I was going to post here a picture of the V7 racer that I had until recently, but the file is too big. Very fun to ride, and you’ll get a lot of comments..
     
    davyjones007 likes this.
  17. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,688
    Location:
    Chicago
    Your rake and trail wasn't right. My bike doesn't vibrate like that at all. If you don't get the rake and trail equation right you will end up with poor handling...that sounds like a chopper with improper neck and fork geometry...or raked triple trees, which are also a bad idea imho...
     
    Winston Carter likes this.
  18. Winston Carter

    Winston Carter Practically Family

    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    Balch Springs, Tx.
    The vibration wasn't coming from front end it was coming from motor The hard tail frame was after market made for Triumph. It wasn't a weld on. I rubber mounted motor but it still vibrated. Like I said it was a dream before I chopped it.
     
  19. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,688
    Location:
    Chicago
    To me this is a very nice rake/trail set up and is stock from Honda. This one having all the plastic BS pulled off and given an eye candy treatment by Cyril Huze:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    rolf s likes this.
  20. Colin G

    Colin G Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Canada
    I like old Iron heads.

    Here is my ride. A 1975 Norton Commando I rebuilt and customized.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

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