My Vintage Radio Collection

Discussion in 'The Display Case' started by RetroToday, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    So true Eddy! I so want to put a vintage coffee cup on top! If you had the set on long enough it very well would keep it warm! :) Not a good idea though! I really like the almost porcelain looking buttery color finish. It even has light signs of cooking spatter embedded in the paint. I could so easily touch this one up and make it look mint, but I like the patina it has!
     
    Edward Reed likes this.
  2. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    1941 Sentinel 212W.JPG Yet another one! This 1941 Sentinel model 212W bakelite radio needed a bit of TLC, so I got it for a fair price. It's one of the larger and more impressive pre-war bakelites. Very nice details. It also has a lighter than typical chocolate brown color that shows the mottling in normal lighting. What you see is many hours of hand polishing!
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2020
    Edward Reed likes this.
  3. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    Aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress
    very cool! I like the color of that one and you got it back to full original luster it looks like!
     
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  4. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    Thanks Ed. This was a 5 step process that I came up with myself. Three grits of Novus, then Maguires Plast-X, Novus finishing shine which I used to scrub out the residue, then Pledge with cheesecloth. It's tedious work, but the final product makes it worth it. Sometimes bakelite has bad sun fade that cannot be simply polished out.
     
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  5. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    Aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress
    great cocktail! it Does the job in making it look showroom original by that photo! I have cut and pasted your process and product list and added it to my notes for future reference. (royalties be damned! :p )
     
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  6. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    Novus polishes are a must to have. Get the whole kit - #1-#3. Like I mentioned, #1 is just a finishing spray. I also like using Plast-X after #2 because it puts a final glass-like surface on plastics. It even does well on old painted surfaces that need to be buffed out. These products aren't cheap, but they last a long time.
     
    Edward Reed likes this.
  7. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    I grabbed 2 impulse-buy sets today.
    1. A 1947 Federal model 1040TB. This is a clone of a Philco set. This one was practically NOS. Amazing it plays perfectly on all it's original components. I just cleaned and lubed everything and it plays like the day it was made. I like the nice beige dial with red pointer and the deco knobs. A workhorse kitchen radio!
    2. A mini 1948 Travler battery-only portable model 5029. This one needed serious TLC, but I knew I could save it. I spent the day on it and it came out pretty nice. I hooked up modern batteries and replaced one tube (I'm very suprised I had it being I don't do chassis repairs) and it came on screaming! I like the idea that I saved this one. It's a cute as they come.
    1947 Federal 1040TB.JPG 1948 Travler 5029.JPG
     
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  8. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    Aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress
    wow! nice ones! where on earth do you actually "go" to find these to make an impulse buy? I never see radios at the antique shops in my area. I only scan what is offered on eBay or Etsy
    I would love to imagine a pretty girl going to the beach with that portable listening to frank Sinatra or an episode of Grand Ole Opry :D
     
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  9. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    Thanks Ed. When you're in the hobby as long as I have, these sets seem to find you. My biggest problem is having restrain. I know several sources here on Long Island that find these sets almost daily. They go everywhere and anywhere for them. Travler made a slew of these mini portables after the war. The problem with the small models is jamming modern batteries into them. I barely got the 67.5V B supply in there. The chassis is a micro size classic All-American 5 using miniature tubes. They perform well though!
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
  10. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    I got this set in a trade from a friend. It's a 1934 Westinghouse model R-22. A decent 5-tube set that has a rather odd way of tuning. You must put downward pressure as you tune to engage the mechanism, otherwise the knob feels loose, wobbly, and does nothing 1934 Westinghouse R-22.JPG . This is my first amateur cabinet resto. I'm learning step-by-step. It's not easy!
     
  11. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    A 1939 Delco model R-104. This is truly a "luggage-style" portable, but it's smaller than expected. Like mini piece of 1930's luggage. These were likely designed to be used in the car. The driver could place it on the seat next to him and have the dial facing up at him. The dial area is much like those in cars of the 1930's with the small ivory Tenite knobs. The chassis hangs upside down and is rather awkward to remove. My friend got it working on modern batteries and it plays very nicely with a mellow sound. A cute portable.
    1939 Delco R-1401.JPG
     
  12. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    I found this tired and worn looking "as-found" 1938 General Electric GD-60 radio in a local antiques mall. I used to think this was homely looking set years ago when I first started collecting, but it's actually pretty attractive in person. A modern looking radio in it's day. I got it home and was pleasantly surprised to see it shine up beautifully. Also, the chassis had a basic recap years ago, so it actually worked well. It's a 6-tube set with a glass ballast that you could cook an egg on. You rarely see these with a good original finish, grill cloth, and decent paper dial inserts. By the original station tags, it's from the Chicago area. 1938 General Electric GD-60.JPG
     
  13. decojoe67

    decojoe67 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Long Island, N.Y.
    This is a really excellent example of a hard to find battery only portable. This early 1940 4K400M is much less seen than the late version, model 5G401. That model had a detachable rear antenna with inputs to the right of the dial and decals that include the words "Long Distance". This one has a cleaner look. Even the insides are mint with all the original tall Zenith etched tubes, and Eveready batteries dated 1947! A pretty brown luggage-style cloth that also came in black, grey, tan rawhide, and, at $45 the most expensive model in genuine leather (that's almost $800 in 2020 money), has a dark-toned wooden front panel.
    1940 Zenith 4K400M.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020

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