On Retirement And Hats

Discussion in 'Hats' started by earl, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    That is one of the reasons I continued to work til just before my 70th birthday. I handled the contract work for a consulting engineer so we had flexibility as to the when. I worked 3 days a week (Tues thru Thurs) for about 8 or 9 months of the year. We could schedule the work and block big chunks of time off so my wife and still could travel for 2-3 months each year. Plus I loved the work, it was physical which was great for me....didn't have to bother with the gym membership. And they paid me for it. But it reached a point where the physical toll had become too great and it took me the Friday and into the Saturday to recover enough to other things I love like hiking and bike riding. I started to resent when Tues rolled around and I had to begin the cycle again.....so I pulled the pin.
     
  2. Rmccamey

    Rmccamey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Sounds like you optimized the situation. That's my plan as long as my health holds out.

     
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  3. tropicalbob

    tropicalbob My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Nicely put. After working on Wall Street for ten years I was promoted and transferred to Miami, where, after the market crashed a few months after I arrived, my wife and I found ourselves in a strange city with all of our belongings and no jobs (the firm I worked for got wiped out). My wife said, "Well, you know, you've been dying to go into teaching for a while now, why not give it a shot? Do you realize that the first word out of your mouth every morning for the last few years has been a four-letter one?" Miraculously, I made one phone call to the local high school and started work the next week. A few weeks after that, I stopped in at the university, as I'd read that they had one of the best graduate departments in the very subject I was most interested in. I applied, and a few months later I received a letter in the mail in which I found that I was not only accepted but had been granted a full scholarship. In the meantime my wife had found a very good job that soon led to an exceptionally good one. So, I couldn't agree with you more: working at a job you love isn't really like working at all. I love it so much I can almost put up with administrators.
     
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  4. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Exactly so, I do a couple of shifts a week, but the company like to use me as cover when one of their managers takes annual leave. It's always a balancing act. The British income tax system is paid as you earn, unless you are self-employed. Tax is levied in increments, the basic level being twenty percent of income. By income, that includes unearned income and I have two pensions, so I'm always aware that I can go over to the next higher tax band.
    That is more or less how I will finally call it a day. Talking to one of the younger, full time, members of staff, I explained that working because you want to is so much more different than working because you have to. It's also reassuring to know that there will be no financial pain when that time comes.
    Your tale resonated with me, I too did something similar. When needs must, if you stop feeling sorry for yourself, it becomes possible to actually see the wood from the trees. Losing a well paid job, living in an unknown (to you) place, having no social circle, all adds to the pressure. But step back, take a deep breath and you might just find that the skills that you put to good use when employed, are just as handy to have when finding a new goal. Well done you.
     
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  5. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    The other interesting and wonderful aspect of working this late into life is that it became just about the work.

    There was no longer any of the attendant crap. I was content with my pay, content with my position....nothing to strive for, no promotion to chase or raise to justify. I could just show up at work each day and do the job....which I loved. I could just enjoy that process thoroughly and totally unto itself. Completed each day and returned home with a clear mind and a tired body...fully satisfied with the day as it was. And yes, I consider myself fully blessed to have a retirement that is funded and have no financial worries...especially true in these pandemic times.
     
  6. Rmccamey

    Rmccamey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    You guys are making me jealous. I'm not quite there yet, but the days of showing up and not worrying about promotions, publications, and chairing the next great committee are getting to be fewer all the time :)

     
  7. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    The Lounge was, or still is, great therapy for getting used to retirement. My wife, having served 30 years in our National Health Service, loves the fact that she no longer lives to the call of the clock. She can lose herself in her cabin creating bespoke clothes, many of which are for your's truly. Regrettably I never learned any sort of creative skill, however, I do have a love of literature, everything from Shakespeare to Twain. Reading has always been my preference.

    My work was in what is known as the logistics industry. That's the movement of goods from manufacture to end user, by land sea and air. The company that I was employed by was an international conglomerate, it meant that I travelled a great deal. Western European countries, The Middle East, mostly Saudi Arabia and North America. It sounds glamorous but there comes a time when you just can't face one more departure lounge.

    My last position in that company was the head honcho of the distribution centre of one of the UK's leading supermarkets. Eventually the city traders saw big bucks in the break up of that conglomerate, and, following the passing of it's CEO, that's exactly what happened. By then I was in my early fifties and like so many others, out you go.

    It was an opportunity that I took to start up on my own, a year later my brother joined me and we never looked back, even a couple of serious bad debts just bounced off of us. Eventually there came a time when my brother wanted out. He was looking forward to reducing his golf handicap. We took the decision to sell up. I was 64 and retired. It lasted 18 months, try as I might I just couldn't settle into retirement. Salvation came when one of my former clients called, completely out of the blue. They wanted an experienced manager, but only for a couple of days a week, that was definitely for me.

    I've been there for a few years now and the two days a week have become first three and then four and in a few weeks time it will be five. It may sound sad, especially to those retired and loving it, or to those in a job where Monday always seems to come round quicker than Friday. But to me, keeping the balls in the air is just the best stimulus ever. My commute is a ten minute walk and my working day will be nine am to four pm. My Missus has given me her blessing, and I have given her my promise, no more 12 to 14 hour days. I couldn't be happier.
     
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  8. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
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    I worked til I was 69 and retirement was bittersweet. It was time as the work had a physical component which I loved but the toll was getting too great and my standards started to slip. In my fatigue I found myself accepting 'good enough' too often and to me that was a signal it was time. But I love to work, and I loved this particular job. There are days that I miss at least some aspects of it. But the positive affect is that it has pushed me into other endeavours...such as hat making. And as the shop is in my garage the commute is waaaay better.
     
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  9. glider

    glider One of the Regulars

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    If you were a basically a happy person when you were working then you will be in retirement also, the reverse is also true. I think we need something our someplace to work for, could be a part time job or volunteer work or even a workout routine but some reason to get up dress and go somewhere. I have a part time job and I enjoy the interaction with other people. I would say that I really don't need the money but I sure don't have any problem spending it. On the whole I highly recommend retirement.
     
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  10. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Isle of Langerhan, NY
    I retired but went back work full time, but in a totally different industry. The main difference is the complete absence of stress. It's great.

    I need to be somewhere, on a schedule, more than occasionally.

    I started out there wearing fedoras, but I was getting them dirty too often, mainly by bumping into a low greasy rack (naptha and I have become very close). I've taken to wearing ball caps until I figure out which of my fedoras is going to be the sacrificial work hat.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
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  11. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    I made an attempt to go back to work late last year. It only lasted 7 months (October 2019 to April 2020) because I was lied to about the job, but it was rather dirty warehouse work (a distributor of industrial strength cleaning supplies, ironically). My solution was to buy a few cheap flat caps on Amazon, so when they got dirty or possibly damaged I wouldn't care much. I still have them because I didn't work there long enough for them to experience the level of filth or damage I expected.
     
  12. Silver-Wolf

    Silver-Wolf One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    190
    Location:
    South Australia
    I enjoyed retirement until you get bored and then the challenge is in finding things that interest you, keep you busy and alive. 3+ decades since I stopped working and retired and to be honest I really miss the normal work gig lol. Mind you, long as you find something interesting and learn something new each day your doing a-ok in my books!

    I'm silver 'n grey wit a lil bit O' white (ok alot of white lol) but still taking name 'n kicking asses. "n styling with a lid while I do it!~

    Cheers Wolf.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
  13. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,217
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Yes, I fully agree. While I do miss many aspects of work I do have zero regrets. I left when it was time to go and I have developed another life....one that I love as much as i loved my working life. Having the freedom to do whatever and whenever makes for a stress free life. Most days in the Covid restricted life of today is spent in my shop making, repairing hats. I usually have one or two or three on the go. Will work on one for a bit then take a break and watch a recorded ball game on the TV in my shop....then do a bit more. Maybe take a real break for a nap or go for a bike ride. When the Covid thing settles down some we will resume our 3-4 months travel each year. Life truly is good
     

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