RIP VHS is Dead

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Hondo, Jan 5, 2009.

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  1. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    22,109
    Location:
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    It seems to me that the entertainment industry will have a much harder time selling us new formats now, as the market is fed up with buying the same stuff over again on vinyl / cassette / CD.... etc. This can only be a good thing, as any changes are more likely to be designed to play prior formats (e.g. all Blue Ray players can play DVDs).

    I guess it's an individual thing - I understand what you mean about "every day wear;" I'm just one of those folks with a terminal hoarding impulse, I suppose. [huh]

    There's the rub: HD formats are never going to offer you any real benefit if you're not plugging them into a TV that has the resolution to display the difference. Like anything else, any perceived "upgrade" in TV, home movies, etc is worth only what value the individual user ascribes to it.

    That I can understand. I think it's less of an issue now in an age when most shows that have anything of an audience will be out on DVD almost as soon as the series run ends, but I know what you mean about having a stockpile. In my case, I have so few tapes that anything worth keeping can be quickly and easily transferred, but I'd hate to do that with hundreds of tapes.

    Very true. Have to move quick, though - very few retailers here in the UK even carry VHS anymore. Strange to see something like that that was once so hi-tec come and go. Myself, I'm looking forward to the greater convenience of a DVD HDD recorder. There are models out with huge hard drives on which you can store programmes for time-shifting (I can never find a blank tape in a hurry!), and anything you want to keep may be burned from the HDD to DVD at a later stage. To be honest, though, time-shifting forf me is really little more than an after-thought nowadays, as with the proliferation of free to air digital channels in the UK it is a very rare thing for a show I might miss to not be screened several times in the one week, and/or available for free download online. Nevertheless, to have that capability in the same box as a good DVD player would be a bonus. If only they would release one of those that also played Blu-Ray.... one box where formerly one might have required three! (VCR, DVD, Blu-Ray).

    Yes, that's the thing. It is clearly better (though not anywhere near so much so as DVD vs VHS), but you have to have a TV capable of showing the difference. Also, unless the film on the disk was originally shot in Hi-def (as I understand it, this would only really be within the last five years or so), there is no advantage to be had over a DVD in an 'upscaling' player.
     
  2. Hondo

    Hondo One Too Many

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    Location:
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    I won't be buying any Blu Ray machines, unless I win the Lottery :p
    I'm staying with basic DVD's, and try only to purchase classic movies.
    Its insane to have a huge library of DVD's as well as the VHS tapes.

    Toshiba still has dvd/vcr combos on the market (see below) I got one a year ago for replacement on advice from a member here, it not only plays, records VHS but mp3 and other formats, plus digital dvd player.

    http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/dvd/product.asp?model=SD-V295
     
  3. SamMarlowPI

    SamMarlowPI One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,761
    Location:
    Minnesota
    i say, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it"...half my film collection is vhs and i still watch them on a regular basis...i may purchase an extra combo player to keep for the future and any vhs that dies on me will be replaced with a dvd copy..maybe...but still, dvds brand new are still around $20 and bluray is ridiculous...i think i saw a sticker for like $35 or $40...no way...not now...
     
  4. MrBern

    MrBern I'll Lock Up

    rabbit ears

    BTW, I'd like to remind everyone who's going off to look for a new VCR, that along with the televisions that are about to need upgrades for the digital conversion, so goes the VCR's tuner.
    http://www.dtv.gov/

    So if you timeshift by setting your vcr to record off a few different channels in one evening, old vcrs with the analogue wont be able to do that anymore.

    A lot of the more recent VCRs have no tuner & jsut record straight off a LINE OUT from a cable box.

    If youre just using the vcr to play your old tapes, then you wont be effected.
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    That's true unless you're a cable subscriber -- most cable systems continue to support analog service, and will do so for a while yet. I use my VCR in lieu of a cable box, feeding my elderly television set, and the cable company assures me it'll still continue to work. They tried to sell me a digital upgrade, until I told them what I'd be watching it on.
     
  6. DutchIndo

    DutchIndo A-List Customer

    Messages:
    484
    Location:
    Little Saigon formerly GG Ca
    VHS !? I still have a crap load of Beta tapes ! I refuse to get rid of them because I have alot of 80s music videos on them. I also have some cool documentries and rare 3 Stooges. I still have the Beta Player it doesn't work though. I spent 300.00 dollars on it - 80s dollars. I remember they had VCR repair places where they would charge you 60 bucks just to open it. Last time I checked VCRs were going for 40 bucks. The first VCR I ever saw was at my friends house. His brother was an electronic nerd who had everything it's where I saw a Laser Disc. His VCR at the time cost about a Grand and it weighed about a 100 lbs. I wouldn't doubt if it had vacume tubes it also had a cable attached to the remote ! Like Watches they have become a throw away design.
     
  7. Doh!

    Doh! One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,079
    Location:
    Tinsel Town
    Another problem with the download-only future: sharing. My friends and I are continually lending each other DVDs. How the devil do you share a download? Sure, some day it'll probably be as simple as emailing a photo, but we ain't there yet.

    By the way, for recording programs nothing beats DVRs. I hardly ever watch "live" TV anymore -- I tape it all and then fast forward (or skip) the commercials. I can get through an hour-long show in 40 minutes.
     
  8. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    22,109
    Location:
    London, UK
    See, that's the point entirely: as far as The Man is concerned, a DVD shared is a sale lost. The ideal for the entertainment industry is to create a format which can only possibly be used by someone ho has paid to do so. Welcome to the future....
     
  9. Lady Day

    Lady Day I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Crummy town, USA

    I share DLs all the time. I burn a CD/DVD or connect my iPod to my friends computer and drop a folder on their desk top.

    I dont have a TV, I use my desk top CPU as my entertainment hub. I converted about 80% of my VHS to digital files then cataloged them and put them in a book of DVDs. Physically I got rid of dozens of VHS tapes and now I have only one photo album of DVDs.

    LD
     
  10. Flivver

    Flivver Practically Family

    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    New England
    It's scary, but I still view the VCR as a relatively *new* technology...at least one I remember being introduced.

    I was lucky enough last summer to pick up a real relic of video recording technology at a local flea market...a 1965 Sony Home VTR in a walnut cabinet with a built-in Sony B&W TV monitor. It uses half inch reel-to-reel video tape!

    My research indicates that this was the first video tape recorder marketed for home use. It cost $1,200 new so not many were sold. And it weighs about 100 pounds!
     
  11. SamMarlowPI

    SamMarlowPI One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,761
    Location:
    Minnesota
    wish i was smart enough to do that...
     
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