Shirt collar oddities - Boardwalk Empire Shirt Collars

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Matt Deckard, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Links don't work for me. Maybe because I am fropm europe and some Google books are restricted to a country. If it is possible to make a screenshot of the collars and post is as an image please?
     
  2. JonnyO

    JonnyO A-List Customer

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    I apologize for that FFF, hope these work for you.

    Slidewell.JPG

    VanZandt, Jacobs & Co..JPG
     
  3. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    No need. Thank you very much. Very interesting collars indeed.
     
  4. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    i'll never understand what they were trying to achieve with the mid teens trend for stiff collars with no tie gap:

    [​IMG]

    it looks like the poor tie knot is trapped behind some stuck elevator doors waiting for them to open.

    not to mention how uncomfortable that stiff collar looks.
     
  5. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    there's lots of no-tie-gap shirts in the early 20s catalogues too, though by now they're softer than the above. dressy:

    [​IMG]

    and more casual / work:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. scotrace

    scotrace Head Bartender Staff Member

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    I sure like it though.
     
  7. Luftwaffles

    Luftwaffles One of the Regulars

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    I've actually worn a few of those collars before. They were the older styled paper collars, but once you get used to it, it's actually not that bad.
     
  8. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    to me it looks like they haven't quite decided where the tie knot should be; in front ? behind ? stuck between the collar edges ?
     
  9. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

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    Stiff collars aren't that uncomfortable, but it is however very hard to tie the tie as the collar already must be folded. That's one of the main reasons why I mostly stick to soft collars nowadays.

    I'm not a big fan of the no gap-collars but if I were to wear one I'd put the knot on the outside
     
  10. Trapped in T-wilight Zone

    Trapped in T-wilight Zone Familiar Face

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  11. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

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    This one is designed to curve around the tie-knot:

    $_57.JPG
     
  12. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    next shirt question: what is the point of this contrasting bib ?

    you're wearing a jacket and it looks like you've got a striped shirt on underneath.
    you take the jacket off and lo, it's actually a cream shirt with a striped bib and cuffs.

    why ?

     
  13. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    Economics. Striped shirting fabric was more expensive.
    Having only the visible parts (collar, chest, cuffs) in fancy fabric is cheaper than making an entire shirt of it.
    Also the white fabric for the bulk of the shirt was usually of a very sturdy sort allowing for hard wear.
    There even were jersey-fabric undershirts with such striped bibs and collars.

    Such shirts were very common in Germany among workers/farmers until the early 50's.
    Another aspect that was important during wartime and postwar was the re-use of old/torn fancy shirts or leftover fabric on hardwearing white cotton shirts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  14. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    Fastuni, that makes sense, but what's odd about the shirt above is that the cream fabric is fancy. it doesn't look like a basic white cotton.
     
  15. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    From the photos the cream-white fabric looks sturdy though... there were also such fabrics with patterns.
    Alternative explanation would be that the blue-striped parts were added later. But it looks too well done.
     
  16. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

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    I imagine that one probably wore a waistcoat with those contrasting bib shirts.
     
  17. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Two damaged shirts made into one? But I agree with Fastuni. It looks to clean and purposeful to be a patch job.
    Great collar shape btw. Doesn't even need to be longer.
     
  18. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    almost certainly. but is the wearer reluctant to take their jacket off in case everyone sees that their shirt is made of - gasp ! - two different fabrics ?

    here's an Arrow shirt with contrast bib:

    [​IMG]

    again, the logic defeats me. people see your cool horizontal-striped shirt (which would have been worn with separate white collar, in keeping with the collar stand)... but does that mean you can't take your jacket off in case they see it's not striped all over ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  19. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    my feeling is that this particular shirt is exactly that. i can't imagine that shirt being mass produced with such a fancy off-white fabric.
     
  20. mactire

    mactire New in Town

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    Location:
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    We haven't the cultural memory of how expensive manufactured goods were compared to wages, and this included wovens. Even these days a colour woven cloth will be dearer from a mill than a plain or piece-dyed cloth. There were lots of tricks around this, denim for instance where the weave construction allows it to appear blue when it is a blue warp over undyed cotton weft.

    In my grandfathers time it was common for policemen like him to have to buy their uniform when it was old off their employer and then have it turned, so taken completely apart and the inside face of the cloth turned outwards. This sounds insane in terms of the labour involved but a heavy handwoven tweed in the mid-1950s might have cost you 5 guineas a yard, or over a weeks pay for labourer and you need 3 yards for a two-piece suit.
     

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