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So trivial, yet it really ticks you off.

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by GHT, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. Lean'n'mean

    Lean'n'mean Call Me a Cab

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    Cloud-cuckoo-land
    Or take legal action against a local farmer because his cockerel wakes them up in the morning.
     
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  2. 3fingers

    3fingers One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,267
    Location:
    Illinois
    Hence the reason for right to farm laws here in the U.S.
    The nuisance lawsuits got completely out of control brought by people moving out into the hinterlands and being outraged by the noise, dust or sights and sounds coming from nearby farms that had been there for generations before the special people graced the yokels with their presence. One memorable complaint involved a lady complaining that her neighbors cattle engaged in sexual behavior where her children could witness it. Others did not like the dust produced during harvest season.
    The majority were reasonable and came to some accomodation with their neighbors as far as working hours near their homes, buffer zones for spreading manure, etc.. Others ran to attorneys at the first minor annoyance without ever contacting the source of their discontent.
     
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  3. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    Midwest America
    Only reason I could see getting a large pickup is to live out my Walter Mitty locomotive engineer (train driver) fantasy... and my wife has already said no. So, that's that.


     
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  4. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    “Regular” cars as we’ve known them — sedans and coupes — make up a dwindling percentage of new vehicles produced. “Crossovers,” smaller, more car-like SUVs, are all the rage.

    I can see the appeal here, where it might be 60-plus degrees this afternoon and tomorrow morning we’ll wake to a foot of fresh snow. And the things are compact enough not to be too great a handful in city traffic.
     
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  5. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    Speaking from personal experience, I can tell you that driving a truck (of any size) and "driving" a train are more dissimilar than they are similar. Of course, you can put an air horn on just about any motor vehicle. ;)
     
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  6. BobHufford

    BobHufford I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,687
    Location:
    Springfield, MO, USA
    I had air-horns on a dressed out '77 Suzuki 750 back in the day. Sure got the attention of the "cagers" about to pull out in front of me.
     
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  7. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,087
    Location:
    New Forest
    Simple answer, by a classic. (models to be included)
    duesenberg.jpg

    The car is called Jessica, so named because my wife, who named her, said she was a redhead, had a fabulous body and a cracking pair of hooters.
    MG fun.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
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  8. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    Is the phrase “summer people” in the locals’ working lexicon?
     
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  9. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    1,693
    Location:
    Midwest America
    Not just any air horn: an actual K5LA (used on an Amtrak locomotive and can be heard for miles) and an ebell as well.

    A friend voiced her disapproval, "I mean, it's all right for a TRAIN... but not in my NEIGHBORHOOD."
     
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  10. Lean'n'mean

    Lean'n'mean Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,673
    Location:
    Cloud-cuckoo-land
    I can see the similarities.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. vitanola

    vitanola My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI
     
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  12. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    You still hear that occasionally, although "outastatah" is more common around my section of the coast. You also hear "summer complaints" a lot, which is an old term with an interesting origin. "The summer complaint" was 19th Century slang for a a certain extremely violent form of diarrhea, related to a type of cholera, that was very common in the summertime -- so you can see how it got attached to the tourist crowd.
     
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  13. HanauMan

    HanauMan Practically Family

    Messages:
    754
    Location:
    Inverness, Scotland
    That is funny, especially since I, when a tourist, feel much the same way about the locals in the places I visit most of the time! ;)
     
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  14. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
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    Location:
    London, UK
    It's used as such now; Christian usage of the evergreen Christmas tree seems most likely to begin with Martin Luther, a good couple of hundred years before Christmas became really popular (Christmas as we know it is a very much more recent invention than most people would assume). There are a whole range of Winter traditions which involved an evergreen tree, holly, ivy and the rest predating the Chritianised Christmas tree, of course; it seems the Christian usage of these evolved out of such earlier pratices, albeit with a different intended meaning behind that symbolism. Much like Yule, Father Christmas (not the same person as Santa Claus, but one of Santa's many pre-Christian ancestors), the Yule Log, and so on.

    It does rather smack of tree-theft. Not to mention being too cheap to buy a tree, and too dumb to realise you've spent the same money on petrol getting out to steal one and bringing i home...

    I enjoyed real Halloween more, before the Americansed version came back to this side of the Atlantic and took over from the original folk traditions. It's corned beef and cabbage all over again.

    Everyone I met in NYC was lovely, with the specific exception of two, very specific groups: security/immigration staff at JFK, and the staff at the theatre where Wicked was playing.
     
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  15. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    Cutting of Christmas trees on public lands is permitted in certain locales. I’ve never done it myself, but I know folks who have. I sensed it was as much an excuse for a family outing as to save on the cost of a Christmas tree.

    The practice is okay by me, in the places where I’ve known it to be done. The forests are so thick in some of those places that you can’t see more than a dozen or so feet into them. So whatever environmental damage it might cause is negligible at worst, considering the plenitude of trees and the relatively few Christmas tree cutters. I just wouldn’t wish people to think that it is somehow more ecologically sensitive than purchasing a farm-grown tree at the lot in town.

    What most annoyed me about the Ford ad was the clear suggestion that is more virtuous to cut one’s own tree out in the wilds. Don’t throw out your shoulder patting yourself on the back, lady.
     
  16. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    18,978
    Location:
    London, UK

    Interesting... I am, of course, informed largely by having grown up and always lived on islands where very little natural forest exists, as opposed to managed (and largely artificial) woods.
     
  17. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

    Messages:
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    Location:
    My mother's basement
    It would become a real problem if everyone who bought farm-grown Christmas trees decided to go out into the forest and cut a “wild” one instead. But, Ford television ads notwithstanding, I can’t envision that happening.

    “Old growth” forests are largely depleted now, much to the chagrin of many. Out in the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state the HUGE cedars are mostly gone. Still, it’s a temperate rain forest, with conditions all but ideal for several varieties of evergreens. If all the humans left for a couple-three or four years, most signs of their ever having been there would be obliterated by new vegetation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    When I was a kid we used to just go a mile or so out of town and cut something off the side of the road. Scraggly, malformed, covered in bugs and lichens, and often a cat spruce. But it was free.

    All Christmas trees I remember from those days were ridiculous-looking things -- it was what a Christmas tree looked like. The craze for manicured, perfectly-shaped trees didn't hit here until the '80s, around the time my mother said the hell with it, and got an artificial one. And yet she managed to go out and find a weird-looking malformed artificial tree.
     
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  19. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,087
    Location:
    New Forest
    Prehistoric was it?
    xt.jpg
     
  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    More like this --

    [​IMG]
     
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