So trivial, yet it really ticks you off.

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by GHT, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

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    The misuse and overuse of the word « amazing. »
    :D
     
  2. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

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    People who drive with pets sitting in the middle of their lap. I saw some fellow struggling to negotiate a left turn the other day. He had a midsized dog sitting square in the middle of his lap and had one arm wrapped around the dog. The fact that he was blatantly running a red light and did not even attempt to slow down is an annoyance already mentioned in the past.
    :D
     
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  3. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Remember the days when it was "awesome"?
     
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  4. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    One thing, that astonishes me every time:

    When I go to supermarket, in the evening, I can often see couples on my age (30+). And when they are at the checkout, they typically got only some ingredients for seemingly cooking evening dinner.

    So, I'm always thinking: "Do they always have an empty fridge at home??"
     
  5. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    I food shop probably five days per week on average. It’s just me and the lovely missus living here, so buying larger quantities of perishables would result in much of it going bad before we got around to consuming it.

    So I generally pick up what we’ll be having for dinner that evening and whatever other supermarket items are running low at home. I’m in and out in a matter of minutes, usually.
     
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  6. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

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    Yes, I do and it annoyed me as well. :D
     
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  7. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    Likewise.
     
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  8. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Agree. Interestingly enough, awesome is really not a part of my vocabulary. I just never seem to use it. My wife will though, usually with a child and with regard to a praiseworthy accomplishment. (I just say good for you...).
     
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  9. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    "Awe" is an emotion you would experience in the presence of the Almighty, not on tasting a good hamburger. Clearly this was a routine abuse of hyperbole, a low-rent rhetorical technique.
     
  10. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    I'm happy, that I never hear "aaaaawes" at night. Overaging Germany. ;););)
     
  11. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    Much as it might annoy, I fear we have little choice but to acknowledge we have lost that battle.

    One of my sister’s offspring is now an elementary school principal. “Awesome” is her default response to any favorable action on the part of her little charges.
     
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  12. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

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    On my last naval deployment, the XO used the word “awesome” with such regularity during tannoy announcements, we placed wagers on how many times it would be used, the closest getting a free round in the mess.
     
  13. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    That's exactly it, habitual use becomes the norm. They really are not aware of the times that they repeat themselves. One I used to hear was basically, usually at the start of a sentence. Another example is someone that I know who uses the phrase, "to cut a long story short," only he abbrieviates it to, long story short, then goes on and on until your ears bleed.
     
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  14. 3fingers

    3fingers One Too Many

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    As annoying as the overuse of awesome is it is still preferable to the original early 1980s use which was "totally awesome".
    As I recall this went along with "gross me out the door" and "gag me with a spoon" as expressions of disgust among teenaged girls.
     
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  15. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    A vulgar term for the mouth, in Britspeak, is the gob. One expression that I can't abide is, when someone is rendered speechless, they use the term: "gobsmacked."
     
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  16. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    “Totally” all on its lonesome is very much in use around here. It’s most often used to mean something along the lines of “I’m in complete agreement.”

    I don’t like it so of course I don’t use it. I’m tempted to say, on hearing it, “totally? as opposed to partially?”

    But, alas, it’s another of those losing battles.
     
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  17. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    As opposed to partially, I like that.
     
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  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Totes.
     
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  19. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    May as well.
     
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  20. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    The first time I heard someone say the phrase "totes adorbs" (which translates into modern English as "totally adorable") I thought they were speaking a language other than English. It was only by context that I realized I was wrong, and not long after that this particular slang phrase was used for comedic effect on a television program I was watching. "Oh, that's what she was saying." And I thought "groovy" was stupid. o_O
     
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