Suits - Pre 1920

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Two Types, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. Broccoli

    Broccoli One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    264
    Location:
    Sweden
    It is with 99% certainty made in the northern part of Sweden, they were part of a collection of clothes that belonged to the people who once lived on some farm up there.
    Are you happy with it, dost?
     
  2. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    Yes, I sure am! The fit is perfect and I am really fond of the overall look and feel of them! :)
     
  3. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

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    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    Wallace Reid, 1919

    [​IMG]
     
    1mach1 likes this.
  4. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    ^Short rise on those strides above.
     
  5. Panadora

    Panadora Practically Family

    Messages:
    526
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    esteban68 likes this.
  6. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    Oh I know that illustration, it's from the Croonenberg 'Blue Book'.
     
  7. Awesomest Guy

    Awesomest Guy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    Land of Ooo
    Indeed! It seems to me that breakless trousers were the most popular variety among young men from the 1900s to the 30s, After which point they seemed to go away, at least until the modern period, now that fashion-forward suits have begun to include narrow, low-rise short trousers of the variety most on FL would absolutely abhor. Of course, the classic variety of breakless trouser is actually quite appealing, IMO.
     
  8. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    I forgot to reply to this topic! Trousers back then did quite often have a low rise. I came across this illustration from the same year (1919) for example:

    menswearofcan1919toro_0527.jpg


    The biggest problem with those modern trousers (I think) is that they are often look like they are too small rather than just 'narrow'. 1910's or 20's Trousers are usually still quite roomy around the hips, even if they are narrow at the hems. (Which actually doesn't seem to be the case at all from that illustration above!)
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
  9. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    We know already that advertising material is not always a fair guide to what was actually made and worn. The styles cut during the 1900-1925 period do include so-called "young men's trousers" with a rise an inch (often only 1/2 an inch) shorter than the standard, but the 'standard' had a fairly generous rise and 99/100 were worn with braces rather than being self-supporting or using a belt. I haven't seen any real-life examples of trousers pre 1960s that are true low-rise with a straighter hip. The bottoms of trousers between 1900-1925 seem to have been consistently 16" with a knee measure of 20-21" and rounder hip and thigh sweep, more like "peg top" trousers. It contrasts sharply with the 18" to 17" knee and straighter hip/thigh you see on modern 'skinny' trousers.

    The difference with modern trousers is the narrow knee and thigh; often a short seat seam and zero ironwork, so it's all attempted in the cut, which you can see by how much the fronts have been fulled onto the backs (which have been cut marginally shorter or the balance notches raised to give try and give a clean fall at the back when the legs are joined). Decent ready-made trousers of the 20/30s/40s/50s still had ironwork done on them and the workforce was made up of skilled tailors and seamstresses.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
    Patrick Hall likes this.
  10. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    No, that illustration definitely seems like a exaggeration and I completely agree on the wider (and well ironed!) hips and knees part (as I also mentioned somewhat in my previous post). I do think there were more 'extreme' versions around in these specific years. Just recently on ebay were two pairs of white flannels with 6.25 and 6.5 inch hems and and a 9.5 and 10 inch rise. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/vtg-1930s-I...6yn%2Fgrc6287PZqQ%2Fk%3D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc) And belts, to me, seem very common. I see them everywhere from films, to everyday photos to catalogues.

    This would probably my favourite example of what I like from a 'teens/early twenties trouser (could, for my taste, actually be a bit wider at the hips, though):

    75791_garold-llojd_or_harold-lloyd_1600x1200_(www.GdeFon.ru).jpg
     
  11. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    ...and another, from 1918:

    [​IMG]
     
    esteban68 likes this.
  12. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    miket5r, esteban68 and Papperskatt like this.
  13. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    Somebody looks like he's been shoplifting!
     
  14. Dinerman

    Dinerman Super Moderator Bartender

    Messages:
    10,562
    Location:
    Bozeman, MT
    Kuppenheimer
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    Wow! What a super example of an early sack lounge. You can see that how the foreparts are cut (very round) marks the period where the morning or 'walking' coat was standard wear and the newer sack or lounge is a shorter version retaining elements of that design.
     
  16. Awesomest Guy

    Awesomest Guy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    Land of Ooo
    It would definitely be easy to wear the coat as morning dress, and I don't mean as a stroller.
     
  17. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt A-List Customer

    Messages:
    441
    Location:
    Germany
    That is awesome, Dinerman. Really hard to find such early gems around here. Specially in this condition...
     
  18. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,236
    Location:
    Germany
    Ultra-rare German ca. 1900 - 1910's three-piece four-button suit.

    Incredibly good condition and wearable size UK/US 42 Long!

    The cloth is strong, thick and scratchy all-wool in a heathered charcoal grey.

    (Also has four wild-patterned "Regattes"-ties and a black hat by J.Seidel Munich)

    Check out the lining material's pattern!

    Anyone interested in more details can PM me.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016
    JJ Katz and willyto like this.
  19. FAGUSKNOTS

    FAGUSKNOTS New in Town

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    england
    PM sent
     
  20. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,042
    Location:
    Berlin
    Awesome suit. You never cease to amaze. You're the vintage sellers' equivalent to a truffle pig.
     
    willyto likes this.

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