Terms Which Have Disappeared

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by KILO NOVEMBER, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    I'm such a boy. An enjoying "Bohème". A little feminine, with an "aesthetical sensibility".

    ?
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
  2. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Pretty much. A cake eater was usually a younger fellow, teens to college-age, while a lounge lizard was older than that. Cake eaters, unless corrected in their habits, would usually grow up to become lounge lizards.

    Harold Lloyd sometimes portrayed "cake eater" type characters in his films, who invariably discovered a surprising inner strength when presented with a menace, which caused them to abandon their cake-eating ways in favor of manly direct action. Such was the trope of the times.
     
  3. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    [​IMG]
    A typical cake-eater in action, c. 1926.

    [​IMG]
    *Not* a cake-eater.

    Enthusiasts of the funny-papers might recall that Dagwood Bumstead started out in life as a cake-eater, and he retains vestiges of the wardrobe to this day.
     
  4. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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  5. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

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    In Canada 'caker' has a different meaning. It comes from the Italian 'mangiacake' and is used to describe a certain type of anglo saxon Canadian. I'm sure the Italian version comes from the English cake eater and was adapted for their use.

    Here is a website devoted to Caker cooking which will be familiar to many of you especially if you have ever attended a church supper in Minnesota.

    http://cakercooking.blogspot.ca/
     
  6. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    The "cake eater" actually ended up with gal. Hot pups!
     
  7. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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  8. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    Today, first time I heared "twinset", on ladies-clothing. Never read it before. A pullover and a same designed cardigan overhead. Seems to be a nice, timeless basic. But I don't know, if I ever saw this on any woman.
     
  9. kaiser

    kaiser A-List Customer

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    My wife used to wear them all the time about 10 years ago, but I think they have gone out of style. She still does have one that she wears for smart casual things though.
     
  10. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I had a very nice twinset before the moths got to it.

    "Mothproofing" is something you don't hear much about anymore. Pity.
     
    vitanola likes this.
  11. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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    Gotta Jet!
     
  12. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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    Faster then a Saber jet!
     
  13. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

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    "A tall drink of water".

    "Hold your horses".

    "A month of Sundays".

    "Once in a blue moon".

    "I don't give a tinker's damn".

    Phrases I use because my parents did, but that I rarely hear anyone else use.
     
  14. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "It looks like Old Home Week around here!"

    s-l1600.jpg
     
  15. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

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    How about whizzing around like a fart in a mitt. My older relatives sometimes used that one, years ago.
     
  16. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    For years I've wondered about the origin of a phrase I first ran across in a 1920s recording engineer's log, in which the technician on duty noted that a "power tube went democratic." From the context it was evident that this tube had suffered a catastrophic failure, and I imagined that there had to be some obscure political origin to the phrase, but I couldn't quite pin it down. But today I came across a note in a turn-of-the-century magazine article indicating that the phrase was in common use among African-Americans in the South during the Reconstruction Era -- when the vote "went Democratic," in a time when the Southern Democratic party stood for disenfranchisement and segregation, circumstances went very much against their interests. How a presumably-white technician in New Jersey in 1929 happened to pick up this obscure bit of forty-year-old slang would likely make an interesting story.
     
    Stearmen likes this.
  17. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    @LizzieMaine

    It makes more sense to me, if it would be this: "went demotic", also "went folksy".
     
  18. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

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    @Trenchfriend



    On the contrary, it does make sense what LizzieMaine said about that phrase.

    I have a diary about the ordeals my ancestor along with others who were

    captured by the Mexican army under the command of General Santa Anna
    in the mid 1800s.
    Some of the words or phrases that were in use back then, probably would not
    make much sense to you or anyone else today.

    The HBO series “Deadwood” & the florid language that is used
    (minus the heavy use of cuss words) is similar in the manner that
    the folks expressed themselves .

    Phrases that today have gone, “the way of the dodo “. ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2016
  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    That is fantastic. Love it.
     
  20. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    It's not too much of a stretch to imagine that your radio engineer might have been a jazz fan. After all, even in "the day" jazz records were played on the air. If he were a real aficionado, he may well have been a customer at nightclubs where black jazz musicians played. It seems like a not-unlikely place for him to have picked up slang current among the musicians.
     

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