Terms Which Have Disappeared

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by KILO NOVEMBER, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

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    Yes, my point exactly. The more highfalutin diction is indeed less clear, less descriptive, and less precise than the plainer, five-cent words.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  2. cw3pa

    cw3pa A-List Customer

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    We've sort of gotten off track, but word play can be fun.

    The misuse of epidemic is another bete noire of mine. A disease spread from man to man is epidemic, not villainous behavior perpetrated by one man on another.

    Along these lines are malapropisms. Leo Gorcey of the "Dead End Kids" was a master at mangling english.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  3. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Norm Crosby was famous for it, too.
     
  4. Or as Winston Churchill might say, "This is the type of tedious nonsense up with which I will not put." :D
     
  5. cw3pa

    cw3pa A-List Customer

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    Prepositions can be so tiresome.

    More on cop-speak. DOA at the scene. Unless the victim died enroute to the floor they can hardly have died on arrival.
     
  6. Matt Crunk

    Matt Crunk One Too Many

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    I think that has always meant dead on arrival - as in dead when the cops arrived at the scene.
     
  7. Matt Crunk

    Matt Crunk One Too Many

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    One term I've only heard used once, in film (The Maltese Falcon), but the term "crackin' foxy" has always stuck with me. Was it ever a commonly used phrase, or just Hollywood word-play?
     
  8. cw3pa

    cw3pa A-List Customer

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    (I think that has always meant dead on arrival - as in dead when the cops arrived at the scene.)

    It's a term used by the ER staff meaning: Dead on arrival at the emergency room.
     
  9. Matt Crunk

    Matt Crunk One Too Many

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    A few terms I always heard my grandparents use:

    Funny Books (comic books)
    Play Pretties (toys)
    Kyarn (a southern corruption of the word carrion)
     
  10. It's also a term used by police or paramedics or any first responder to indicate the person was dead upon their arrival at the scene.
     
  11. Matt Crunk

    Matt Crunk One Too Many

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    It's also the title of a Van Halen song, a Punk Rock documentary, and at least two Hollywood movies.
     
  12. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    Only the first was worth watching, a classic. The remake with Dennis Quaid was ho-hum.
     
  13. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    The meaning isn't to hard to unpack, but I don't even remember it from The Maltese Falcon, much less having heard it elsewhere.
     
  14. Spade says it in the scene where he receives the late night visit from Polhaus and the Lt. after Miles Archer is killed.

    "Sorry I got up on my hind legs boys, but you fellas tryin to rope me made me nervous. Miles gettin bumped and you birds crackin foxy. But it's all right now..."
     
  15. Matt Crunk

    Matt Crunk One Too Many

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    There is such a wealth of old terms in that one line.
     
  16. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

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    A hoot and a half!
     
  17. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

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    Among my people, the newspaper comics pages were called the "funny pages" or the "funny papers." Some newspapers even titled them such. Perhaps some of the remaining newspapers still do.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  18. cw3pa

    cw3pa A-List Customer

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    gal·lus·es
    noun
    1.suspenders for trousers.
    My wife's grandfather used the term for the suspenders on his overalls.
     
  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    In "The Lost Weekend," one of the female characters says "natch" for "naturally" and I have always wondered if that abbreviation was in common use at the time or just something that was specific to that character.
     
  20. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    I've heard it in any number of old movies. Usually it was said by some young person. It must have been an instance of youth culture language. Imagine Jimmy Olsen saying it to Superman in the old TV series.
     

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