Terms Which Have Disappeared

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by KILO NOVEMBER, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    My dad did not part with a dollar casually, but at some point in the '70s, he had a TV antenna installed on our roof and it was no less amazing than the parting of the sea. The rabbit ears provided so-so reception that required constant adjusting (usually by me) and, occasionally, somebody holding them in a certain position for the entire show or game (always me) just to get modestly acceptable reception.

    But with the roof-top antenna, all the major channels (back then, the three networks, two local stations and PBS) came in perfectly. Within ten or so years, most people (not us) in the NY-metro area would have cable and none of this would matter, but at the time, the difference between rabbit-ears reception and roof-top-antenna reception was almost magical.
     
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  2. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    "You crab lice!"

    Still common in the 90s, but disappeared.
     
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  3. M Brown

    M Brown One of the Regulars

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    N Tx
    Fit to be tied
     
  4. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

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    That’s seen something of a resurgence recently, leastwise in my circles. It’s commonly abbreviated “boho” when referring to interior decor and attire and other such superficial matters.

    A rug merchant friend, who also peddles vintage and antique furnishings, is all for it, of course.

    If it were only artistic and literally types who adopted the fashion, I fear my friend would be driving Uber.
     
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  5. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    I love your last comment!
     
  6. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    From the days of the 'British Raj' (the colonial era in India): a person who was a bit flaky (the equivalent of an anti-Vaxxer or a Brexiteer today) might be defined as 'not quite sixteen Annas to the Rupee'.
    This was based on the currency of the day.
     
  7. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    A momentary variation on a theme: what about words or expressions that go out of fashion and then suddenly, inexplicably, come back?
    In the 70s, I remember that people were always 'popping in', but that phrase gradually disappeared, perhaps because it conjured up visions of Amyl Nitrate (poppers). Now suddenly it's everywhere again. As a property manager, I now find that tradesmen say that they'll 'pop in on Thursday'. Administrators of various kinds promise to pop things in emails or the post. TV chefs 'pop it in the oven'. Etc.
    At work I have come to identify the phrase as a sign of inefficiency. When someone uses it, I know that they will be late or not do the job properly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2020
  8. Turnip

    Turnip One Too Many

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    „Fräulein“

    Being a formal form of address up to the 60s of last century, you are lucky not to get a nice slap in the face nowadays calling a young woman a „Fräulein“...;)
     
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  9. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

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    In England many years ago if someone was in financial difficulty or struggling they were said to be 'in queer street'. If they were so badly off there looked like no way out, they were 'a long way up queer street'. The American equivalent would be up shit creek, and up shit creek without a paddle.
     
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  10. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    The American English version of this would be, "A few cans short of a six-pack." The number of cans missing can be changed depending upon the severity of the insultee's condition, but it essentially means that person is somehow deficient (i.e., "comes up short").
     
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  11. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    Funnily enough I remember this phrase and I always think of it when I see Quality Street chocolates. The phrase went out of use because the word queer became a frequent homophobic slur applied to gay men. However it has now been ‘reclaimed’ so that we have queer film festivals, queer art, etc.

    ‘In LGBTQI Street’ wouldn’t have the same resonance, I suspect.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2020
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  12. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    ‘You need to pull your socks up’: said to someone being lazy or inefficient.
     
  13. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    This is not a phrase used in the U.S. The first time I head it, it was used by Idi Amin in a movie released in the 1970's. He was holding a cabinet meeting and hectoring his ministers about the need for some group (I can't recall who) to "pull their socks up". Being totally unfamiliar with the phrase, I took it literally. I remember thinking that even for a nut job like the Field Marshall, General, President for Life, it was a weird thing to say.
     
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  14. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    That's interesting. I wonder if it was one of the Entebbe movies.
    Amin would have picked up that phrase from his British military training. When he came to power, he appeared to be Anglophile and pro-western (as his background and training would have suggested) and so the direction he took came as a surprise to many.
     
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  15. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    See the link under the "movie" in my post. It was a documentary and the link will take you to a page describing it.
     
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  16. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    I'm sorry I missed the link. I remember this movie. We have benefited a lot in the UK from the presence of the Ugandan Asians, many of whom were expelled from the country by Idi Amin (although the policy actually started under Milton Obote).
     
  17. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    You're correct, that would be a bit of a mouthful.



    Yeah, I know what I said. Write your own jokes. :cool:
     
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  18. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

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    Wheel for bicycle and wheelman for a bicycle enthusiast. I believe this was current slang in the late 19th C and I heard it used by some very old relatives.

    In a similar way, here in Canada any small imported car was an English car in the late forties and early fifties
     
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  19. Ticklishchap

    Ticklishchap One Too Many

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    ‘Buck your ideas up.’

    Similar meaning to ‘pull your socks up’ (see above).
     
  20. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    This brought to mind a scene from the wickedly funny Austrailan TV series, Rake. In one episode the lead character, Cleaver Greene, is involved in an election for the parliament when the issue of LGBTQ rights arises. After his campaign manager offers advice on how to deal with the issue, Greene, who has had a puzzled look on his face during the advice giving, says, "Those people need to buy a vowel."
    This was yet another example of how much American (as in U.S.A.) culture seems to have penetrated Australian consciousness. I remember many American pop-culture references cropping up in this series.
     
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