The Era -- Day By Day

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by LizzieMaine, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    ⇧ Love the diagram of how the British guns and planes pushed the German planes away from the English coast. Not sure I really learned anything from the diagram, but I applaud the effort.
     
  2. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    More in today's news

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    This jaywalking info is so interesting to me since people still jaywalk and never suffer any consequences. 8 (2).png 9 (2).png 10 (2).png 11 (3).png 12 (2).png 13 (2).png 14 (2).png
     
  3. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    That series of musical dramas touted in the WGN story in the 9/20 Tribune is none other than "The Chicago Theatre of the Air," a first-rate series of operetta productions that ran for fourteen years. If you like Victor Herbert, Gilbert & Sullivan, Franz Lehar, and such as those, this is a series well worth listening to. The only drawback is that in the middle of every broadcast, everything grinds to a halt to allow Col. Robert R. McCormick Himself to descend from the lofty heights of the Tribune Tower and deliver a lecture on some historical or cultural topic. Which is fine, it was his program, whatever -- except that the Colonel is the most mediocre radio speaker short of Herbert Hoover. He delivers his talks in a mumbly, gravely voice that makes him sound like he's either drunk or he forgot to put in his teeth before reporting to the studio.

    A good selection of the broadcasts is here.

    The good Dr. Irving S. Cutter also appears in the Daily News, where Joe and Sally snicker every morning over his name.
     
  4. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    Hooray!, what a devine treat for my ears. Thank you Lizzie for linking the Chicago Theater of the Air.
     
  5. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    Now that you mention it... I recall my dad telling me that my mom and he had (after he was discharged in 1945) attended one of those performances: he said that McCormick appeared before them wearing what looked like a smoking jacket, pajamas and slippers, and rambled on for a few minutes in the middle of the show. When he first hit the stage my dad thought that he resembled some random downtown drunk!

    He brought this up because, as a kid, I used to hound my parents to take my friend and I out to what had been McCormick's Cantigny estate near Wheaton, Illinois: it had been turned into a fine museum celebrating the First Division, with which McCormack as a National Guard officer had served during the First World War. He played that Colonel title to the hilt, but everyone knew that the Illinois National Guard was, at that time, a haven for political hacks and that his title had more to do with family wealth than command skill.
     
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  6. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    RAF bombers last night pounded the Channel coast in a vast foray against the German invasion fleet, with attack after attack on ports from Dunkirk and Boulogne all the way up the coast to the tidal basins of the Low Countries, wreaking havoc on the fleets of ships and barges. Three-hour raids were made on Dunkirk alone, the location of the greatest concentration of German troop ships. Other raiders penetrated deep into Holland, Belgium, and Germany itself, wrecking a supply train and continuing assaults on German gasoline plants, between eighty and ninety percent of which are said to have been struck so far.

    An employee of the Sperry Gyroscope Company who formerly served in the Submarine Service of the U. S. Navy is under interrogation today for a possible role in the July 4th bombing at the World's Fair. Acting on an anonymous tip received by mail, police raided a furnished room at 52 West 87th Street in Manhattan yesterday afternoon and arrested thirty-eight-year-old Edward Albert Kangesier. The suspect's room was reported to be decorated with German flags and Nazi paraphernalia, and various inflammables were found around the room, including nine tear gas pistols and two hundred rounds of tear gas shells, all of German manufacture, along with flares and percussion caps. Also discovered was a quantity of anti-Semitic literature. Kangesier was described as "a former Bundist," who had once been questioned by a Congressional commitee about his distribution of Nazi and anti-Semitic publications. He has been arrested four times previously, including three times for disorderly conduct and once for felonious assault. Kangesier has worked at the Sperry plant in Brooklyn, where Government defense contracts are held, for two years.

    There has been "no contact" with the kidnapper of three-year-old Marc de Tristan, although his family has followed the instructions left by that kidnapper concerning acknowledgement of a $100,000 ransom demand. The "dark middle-aged man with a hook nose" who abducted the child in a wealthy San Francisco suburb last week has been offered "a free hand to open negotiations with the family," but nothing has been heard since the boy's family placed an advertisement in the San Francisco Examiner indicating willingness to pay the money.

    Republican Presidential nominee Wendell Willkie, speaking yesterday in San Francisco, accused the New Deal administration of "partial responsibility for the European War," and urged continued U. S. support for Great Britain, "economic assistance" for China, and the construction of new US air bases in the Pacific. While acknowledging that the New Deal has "achieved a number of reforms that are badly needed," Willkie claimed that the present administration "began by weakening the other democracies and has ended by weakening our own," and that by contributing to "the downfall of European democracy," it must "bear a direct share of the responsibility for the present war."

    Police are investigating stench-bomb attacks on the homes of four executives of the Leviton Manufacturing Company, Greenpoint electrical products firm where employees have been on strike since August 28th. Two of the stench-bombings occured in Queens, the others in Brooklyn, and Assistant District Attorney Joseph F. Hanley invited officials of the company and of Local 3 of the Electrical Workers Union to meet with him tomorrow to discuss the matter.

    District Attorney William O'Dwyer is not ready yet to state when the next Murder For Hire trials will begin, because "the pressure of investigating Brooklyn's sprawling underworld is too great." The District Attorney is still searching for the "big boss" of the notorious rub-out combine, and notes that the conviction of four of its operatives since he took office merely proves that those four were merely "a cog in a well-organized, sternly-disciplined rackets machine." Mr. O'Dwyer expressed confidence that Albert Anastasia is the overlord of all Brooklyn rackets, stating that although Anastasia's primary focus is on waterfront shakedowns, he is deeply interested in the other rackets emanating from Brownsville. Anastasia is presently a fugitive from justice.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_.jpg

    If you live in Brooklyn, you're used to the oddities of the local transit system, traceable back to the days when the borough was a loosely-knit group of separate towns, but for visitors getting around can be baffling. Why do you have to pay ten cents to take the 3rd Avenue trolley to Fort Hamilton, while the 5th Avenue car takes you there for a nickel? This "Second Fare Zone," as the conductor calls it, is a relic of the days when there used to be a shuttle for any passenger traveling past 65th Street requiring a separate fare to use it. That shuttle was eliminated years ago, and the 3rd Avenue car now goes straight thru, but nobody ever got around to abolishing the Second Fare Zone at 65th Street, so it persists to the confusion of out of town riders to this day. And what about the sign at the Church Avenue station directing riders "To The City?" "Isn't Brooklyn part of "the city," the visitor will ask, wondering why he receives only a scowl in return. And then there's the five-cent fare you have to pay to walk thru a tunnel at the Pacific Street BMT station connecting you to the Long Island Railroad. You have exit the BMT turnstile and pay a nickel to pass thru an IRT turnstile and out an IRT exit turnstile before finally arriving at the LIRR terminal -- without ever actually riding an IRT car or even entering an IRT station.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(1).jpg
    (I used to live in Camden, and alas, this statue was never erected. But they did have a "Doughnut Festival" every year, with a Doughnut Queen. A friend won that title one year, and got to parade up the main street wearing an inner tube with the words "DONUT DAME" painted on it in white shoe polish.)

    On the Old Timers Page, Frank N. Kampel remembers the good old days when he used to drink beer with politicians out stumping for votes in Williamsburg. The cow pasture and creek that ran where McCarren Park now is was a favorite gathering place where the candidates and their constituents would sing that old favorite "Beer, Beer, Glorious Beer!" Often they'd sail all the way to College Point aboard a commandeered tugboat, and usually someone would have fallen overboard before the night was over.

    "An Eagle Reader" writes in to second that young man who complained about the dirty windows on the Flatbush Avenue trolleys, and also demanded to know why something isn't done to stop people from smoking on the cars. Isn't that illegal? The editor responds that, yes, it is illegal to smoke on a trolley -- except in the summer, when smoking is allowed in the four rear seats of convertible cars only.

    Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy welcome none other than John Barrymore as their guest tonight at 8pm over WEAF.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(2).jpg
    Hard-throwing Kirby Higbe baffled the Dodgers yesterday as the Phillies beat the Flock 4-2 before a hearty Ladies Day crowd of 20,000 at Ebbets Field. Higbe has long been mentioned as someone Mr. MacPhail ought to acquire, but efforts in that direction have thus far been rebuffed, much to the Red Headed One's frustration. The loss marked Brooklyn's fifth straight as the season winds down. Umpire Bill Stewart, who was unwillingly involved in the fracas last week that culminated with Frank Germano's assault on George Magerkurth, was back for a return engagement and received a boisterous rebuke from the assembled ladies when he chased Brooklyn catcher Babe Phelps for responding unfavorably to his call of a close play at the plate in the fifth.

    Dodger Old Timers take the field between games of today's twinbill for a five inning contest between the "Robins" and the "Dodgers." Film favorite Joe E. Brown will be on hand to serve as a baseline coach, with Al Schacht handling the play-by-play. The day's real games will send Fat Freddie Fitzsimmons and Curt Davis out against Si Johnson and Hugh Mulcahy.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(3).jpg
    The Tigers extended their lead over the Indians in the American League pennant race yesterday to two full games, but the Yankees kept their dwindling hopes alive by edging out the Red Sox. The Yanks are four games behind Detroit, giving them a slim mathematical possibility of creeping up to the top.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(4).jpg
    Fronting "Trend" this week, meet the new House Speaker and loyal acolyte of Vice President Garner, Rep. Sam Rayburn.

    One time king of the Hollywood Latin Lovers makes his first live appearance on a Brooklyn stage starting on Tuesday, when Ramon Novarro opens at the Brighton Theatre in "Command To Love." Claudia Morgan will be she to whom he is thus commanded.

    Charlie Chaplin's long-awaited "The Great Dictator," in which Charlot takes on Hitler, is expected finally to open on Broadway in October.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(5).jpg I'm always up for a story where evil real-estate developers will end up being crushed by boulders.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(6).jpg Ah, Fat Hermann -- the original "short-fingered vulgarian."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(7).jpg "A dog?? Oh, child, please -- we've only just gotten rid of Leona!"

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(8).jpg (Wolf has just found the entrance to the secret underground Fazian base -- and he's smart enough to make sure Irwin goes in first.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(9).jpg (Geo. Bungle and the Myth of Sisyphus.)
     
  7. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_.jpg The News lives for stories like this.

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(1).jpg Florabel Muir is best known as a celebrity gossip columnist for the News-Tribune syndicate -- but she started out as a hardboiled crime reporter in the twenties, one of the first women to be assigned such a beat. Good to see she hasn't lost her touch.

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(2).jpg I think I know all of these people personally.

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(3).jpg Hey, who would know more about fifth columns than a printer!

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(4).jpg Uh, Sam -- who'd you say your father was again?

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(5).jpg I could swear I saw a movie once where the same thing happened to Gene Autry.

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(6).jpg That's "LaZONGA," kid. You'll never be invited to sing at the Flatbush unless you're careful about learning lyrics!

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(7).jpg Well, bless Bess.

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(8).jpg Look, Walt, far be it from me to say anything, but do you really need to eat any more ice cream?

    Daily_News_Sun__Sep_22__1940_(9).jpg Hey, Moon -- why not try shaving your head? It worked for Hennick.
     
  8. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    Lots of piano ads in today's paper, here are a few the hand full listed.
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    The turning back of the clocks is right on par, everyone will soon be doing like wise in November of this year.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2020
  9. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Since it happened in 1940 and since it's easy to get wrapped up in the story, I sometimes forget that there are parents who are experience arrant fear right now. The lack of response, so far, has to be brutal for them.


    As a kid from NJ who started using the NYC Subway in the late '70s - at a time when the cars and stations were often covered in graffiti, garbage was everywhere, it was dangerous at off hours and signage hadn't been updated consistently for many years - learning the subway was a skill that took years to master.

    It's an insanely complex system with many quirks. Today, after years of better management, the signage is pretty good and the maps help, but back then, it was an inside-baseball event to really know the subway well. But if you did, there was and is no better and cheaper way to get around this massive city.
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    I hope you took pics. That sounds like a fun day. A day can't ever go too wrong when doughnuts are involved.


    And it only got worse as, once conquered, Fat Hermann saw museum visits as free shopping trips. Hitler was evil and insane; Goering was a dissolute opportunist.


    To be fair, Leona has become a rational, stable person. If anything, the dog would be replacing John and John brought more chaos than any dog I've known.


    Holy sh*t, Dude's got game. Did not see that coming. He shot Raven into sexual vapor lock.
     
  10. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    Never had any desire to visit NYC until, (figuratively) kicking and screaming, my wife dragged me there so that I could explore it while she attended a medical conference. Sometimes it's great to be proven wrong: I was really impressed by the four track express and local subway main in Manhattan and quickly mastered it. Riding rapid transit for hours on end is a great way to orient one's self to a city, and it's especially true in New York. The city won me over despite myself: like Paris, I learned that stereotypes regarding the coldness and indifference of the natives were bilge. As you indicated, once you master the method of the madness, the genius of the subway system becomes apparent.
     
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  11. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    If I had to choose between the Boston and the New York subway so far as ease of navigation is concerned, I'd take NY. I get down there a few times a decade, and I never have any trouble figuring out how to get to where I need to go. Boston I'm fine as long as I stick to routes I know, but otherwise it gets confusing. But I'll take the Montreal subway over either of them -- it's just a gorgeous system that's a pleasure to use.

    The real issue in Brooklyn 1940, aside from the lingering BMT-IRT-IND factionalization, is the insane web of surface tracks, most of which are in full operation. The buses might not have been the best option long term, but when you look at a trolley map you can at least see why their supporters in 1940 think they have a point.

    Brooklyn-trolley-map-BMT-19.JPG

    Certainly we haven't seen the last of Leona and Governor-elect John, but I expect Mary will have to find another reclamation project to work on until we cross paths with them again. Why, look, here comes her worthless pig of a son, who Bill has always wanted a chance to take a slug at.

    It's a pity we don't have the color for today's T&TP, because I imagine that Raven is a bright shade of red. "Ryan? Ryan who?"
     
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  12. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    Having never been to New York or Boston.

    A visit to Boston is absolutely in my future plans.

    Having taken Chicago "L" (subway elevated) CTA its fairly easy to navigate. Considering the bus lines are separated and there are also Metra trains leading into the nearby suburbs. I've been super spoiled with the way public transit here is mapped out. 75a4d3fedd2614bf2158eeb7874b6721.jpg

    tumblr_ntmimwAqHF1r54c4oo1_1280.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2020
  13. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    1 (2).png 1 (3).png 2 (2).png 3 (2).png 4 (2).png photo-chicago-math-iglers-casino-restaurant-1627-melrose-street-front-waiter-outside-1958 (1).jpg 814357d5cea99b062a27adcaf193b4c1.jpg photo-chicago-math-iglers-casino-restaurant-waiter-and-waitress-in-costume-by-set-table-1958.jpg chicago-restaurant-math-iglers-casino-menu-page-one-readable-1950s.jpg

    Math Igler's Casino looks like a really nice German restaurant.
     
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  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    The "totalitarian bread" is a hoot.

    And, yes, Igler's looks awesome. Boston had a German restaurant "Jacob Wirth" that looks somewhat similar. When I lived in Boston, my girlfriend and I would often meet there on a Friday night after work as we loved the atmosphere.
    jacob-wirth-restaurant-1.jpg BOB_AllStars_121615_JacobWirth_main.jpg
     
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  15. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    French forces at Dakar, West Africa are the target of heavy British naval bombardment after refusing an ultimatum from Free French General Charles deGaulle to surrender. The French troops were reported to be under orders to "resist powerfully" the British attack.

    Meanwhile, nine German invasion ports along the French and Belgian coasts remain under steady attack from British bomber units, with targets in Germany and Holland also under fire. Hits were reported on a supply train near Dresden, and on "an important aluminum works" at Lauta.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_.jpg
    Woodsmen in the Sierra Mountains of Northern California last night rescued the three-year-old son of a French nobleman, kidnapped last week outside his home in a wealthy San Francisco suburb, and savagely beat his accused kidnapper before turning the suspect over to G-Men. Forty-year-old Wilhelm Jacob Muhlenbroich was captured by two Eldorado County lumberjacks while fleeing with young Marc de Tristan Jr. in an automobile on a dead-end road near the town of River Pine. Muhlenbroich had driven a battered Ford sedan over a forty-foot embankment, and then, fearing the car would be recognized, shot a bullet into the gas tank and set it on fire. He then stole a car he found outside a deer hunter's camp and turned onto a road leading to a lumber camp, where, confused, he asked two woodsmen "How the hell do you get out of here." The lumberjacks recognized the child from newspaper photographs, and before Muhlenbroich could pull his gun, they hauled him out of the car and pounded him into submission. Trussing him with rope, they tossed Muhlenbroich into the car's trunk and drove to a nearby general store, where they left the child in the care of the proprietor and led their captive to a nearby cabin to await the authorities. But Muhlenbroich had worked free of his bonds and attempted to escape, only to be pounded bloody by 220-pound lumberjack Cecil Wetzel. Bystanders hauled Muhlenbroich into the cabin and trussed him to the bed while Wetzel called the FBI from the store. G-Men returned the child to his parents and began an interrogation of the suspect, on the assumption that he had confederates who had aided him in the crime, but there have been no further arrests. The German Consul in San Francisco, a personal friend of Adolf Hitler, expressed indignation that a German could commit such a crime.

    Two persons were killed and eleven injured today in an explosion at the U. S. Army's Picatinny Arsenal at Dover, New Jersey, the second munitions disaster in the Dover area in less than two weeks. The blast follows by just eleven days the explosion at the Hercules Powder Company in Kenvil, but authorities say there is no connection between the two incidents. An Army spokesman stated that the Picatinny blast occured as workers were dismantling old shells left over from the World War which used French-made fuses with a heavier charge of fulminate of mercury than those of American manufacture, and it had appeared that, as the workers took the fuses apart to reclaim the metal parts, the fulminate "let go."

    President Roosevelt today set into motion the machinery that will register 16,500,000 American men aged 21 to 36 for military conscription, signing an executive order to establish the rules and procedures that will assemble the largest peacetime defense force in American history. The order sets Registration Day for October 16th.

    The Manhattan man arrested as a suspect in the July 4th World's Fair bombing has been booked on a charge of violating the Sullivan Law, but he denies that tear-gas guns found in his possession are his. Edward Albert Kangeiser insisted under interrogation that the weapons and tear-gas shells found in his apartment were left there five years ago by a friend, despite discovery by police that the guns and shells were of "recent German manufacture." Although Nazi materials and literature were found in Kangeiser's apartment, police are now downplaying the possibility that he was involved in the World's Fair bombing. During his arraignment on the gun charge, Kangeiser admitted that he had been convicted of bigamy while serving in the Navy submarine service during the World War, and that he was also arrested in 1929 for possession of a blackjack. That charge, however, was subsequently dismissed.

    Mystery cloaks the identity of 134 civilian passengers who landed today in Brooklyn aboard a US Army transport from Panama. Those passengers, described only as "refugees" and "aliens" were taken to Ellis Island upon their disembarkation from the ship, with no further information concerning their identity released to reporters, who were forbidden by Army authorities to speak with any of the passengers. It is believed that the group included Jews, Poles, Czechs, Germans, Swedes, Rumanians, Italians, and Egyptians, and that the group includes an indeterminate number of children. It was learned that the passengers boarded the ship at the Panama Canal Zone, but no further information as to their origin could be found.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(1).jpg
    ("Hey!" says Joe. "We oughta go! They got novelties galore!" "What," says Sally, "like 'at dribble glass Solly Pinkus give ya for ya boithday? Whoneedzat?")

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    Three hundred couples married in the year 1900 cavorted at the World's Fair yesterday as guests of the Eagle, amazing Fair officials with their vitality as the old folks took in the Fair's leading attractions as part of the fourth-best Fair attendance of the season and the second-best Sunday of the year. All told, 291,566 persons paid their way onto the grounds yesterday, bringing Fair attendance for the season to more than 13,694,000, and putting the season goal of 17,000,000 within reach if attendance keeps up over the thirty-five days left until the Fair closes forever.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(3).jpg
    ("We can't afford to have a college and a stadium. We start tearing down the college tomorrow.")

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    The Dodgers welcomed the old guard back to Ebbets Field yesterday for Old Timers Day festivities, and celebrated in fine style by sweeping a doubleheader from the Phillies. Fat Freddie Fitzsimmons -- who at 39 is two years older than "Old Timer" Jersey Joe Stripp -- picked up his sixteenth win of the year against only two defeats, with 35-year-old Curt Davis going the distance for the win in the nightcap. In between games, the Old Timers showed the crowd they're still spry despite the passing years, with the "Dodgers" squad defeating the "Robins" by a score of 6 to 3. The "Dodger" team averaged ten years younger than their opponents, but the old boys made a game fight of it. And it was good to see Gus Getz, who got the hit that won the pennant for the Flock in 1916 back out on the field again, if only to renew the memory of that classic Eagle headline "Gus Getz Has Got Guts."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(5).jpg
    The Bushwicks finally got their revenge on their arch-rivals the Homestead Grays, sweeping a doubleheader from the astounded Negro National League pennant winners, 9 to 5 and 1 to 0. The Grays had beaten the Bushwicks 5 times out of six games this year, and were fully expecting to do it again.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(6).jpg (Niiiiiice doggie!)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(7).jpg (I imagine Peggy's been sitting alone in her room crying for the past seven months. Can you blame her?)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(8).jpg (OK, so this isn't Slim. But he's got something to do *with* Slim.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(9).jpg ("Wow! Wolf can say his own name! Hey Wolf, what's on top of a house?" "Ruf!" "Wow, that's great!")
     
  16. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_.jpg The News doesn't break out this typeface very often, but when it does, it gets noticed.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(1).jpg In these pre-polio-vaccine days, ending up in the "boiler" is a very real, very legitimate fear, and it wasn't just kids who got it. Young adults in the prime of life were very frequent victims.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(2).jpg Uh, uh, uh -- we see you guys trying to sneak those CAPS back in!

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(3).jpg Matthew 12:16.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(4).jpg "The Family Press und Volkischer Beobachter."

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(5).jpg Yeah, gooseface, don't press your luck with a guy who can shoot actual daggers out of his eyes.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(6).jpg Don't both saying anything, Pat. Dude can't hear you over the deafening noise of his own awesomeness.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(7).jpg I dunno, kid, you're plenty annoying enough as it is.

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(8).jpg
    I was only joking about the drug plot, but jeez, it does make sense...

    Daily_News_Mon__Sep_23__1940_(9).jpg Either there's a random London-themed nightclub in this town missing its doorman, or Moon took a really wrong turn.
     
  17. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    So glad this one ended well. And that's some rough justice that was meted out, but you take your chances committing a crime and asking lumberjacks for help.


    Tear-gas guns, uh-huh; tear-gas shells, uh-huh; Nazi material and literature, uh-huh; downplaying World's Fair bombing, uh-huh; convicted of bigamy, wait, what?


    His teammates have been surprised by how much yoga has calmed portly Freddie. Again, today, after reading the Eagle's account of the game, instead of throwing the paper and storming out of the locker room, their star pitcher simply assumed the classic yoga pose and started chanting "Ommm...."

    Little did they know that running through his head was this thought, "this 'fat' cr*p better stop next year or an errant practice pitch is going to find an Eagle sport reporter's head so help me God." Perhaps Freddie hasn't fully embraced the spiritualism of yoga.


    How has the turtle managed to survive this long?


    Nope can't blame her at all. Everyone's parents bring some baggage, but Peggy might want to think about running away and changing her name.


    Lichty's bald men could use a little of Dude's confidence. :)


    Willy Loman was also optimistic when he started out.


    One, "Pipdyke," really?

    Two, your drug plot fits perfectly, but comic-strip land ain't going there: two pretty, wealthy young girls hooked on drugs peddled by the chauffeur - I don't think so.

    Three, a love triangle does fit. It will be handled softly here in 1940; but today, he'd be banging both of them and, if it was a streaming show, we'd see it all in the first two minutes of the first episode.

    I'm convinced that market research argues that showing graphic sex in the first two minutes of a new show is a successful way to hook the audience as it happens way too often to be coincidental.
     
  18. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest

    Dined there once. The big deal at Igler's was the singing waiters. I remember the cuisine as being only nominally German: the Golden Ox (North & Clybourne) or Zum Deutschen Eck (Lincoln and Southport) were a better bet for decent beef rouladen or saurbraten mit spaetzle. All gone now: seems like one needs to drive to Milwaukee for decent German cuisine these days.
     
    MissNathalieVintage likes this.
  19. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

    Messages:
    759
    Location:
    Chicago
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    ChiTownScion likes this.
  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    That front page cartoon is a winner. Carey Orr, the artist, who worked for the Tribune for many years, was the uncle of Martha Orr, who created and drew "Apple Mary (Worth)" until 1939. It's a very small world.
     

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