The Era -- Day By Day

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by LizzieMaine, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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  2. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

    Messages:
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  3. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

    Messages:
    759
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  4. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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  5. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    This jerk doesn't need (or deserve) a wife, in that era, he needs a housekeeper or simply to stop being a slob.
    50 (2).png


    This story could easily become fodder for one of our comic strips:
    58 (2).png
     
  6. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Downwind is going to find that his personal charm will only go so far in a marriage. Just ask Uncle Willie Mullins.

    The radio engineer with the records of marital indiscretion is following a minor trend of the thirties -- Rudy Vallee used that technique to catch one of his wives plotting adventures with an adagio dancer, and used the records in court. After that case blared its way across Page Four for a couple of months, there was something of an upswing in the sale of home recording equipment.

    I have a feeling the case of Mrs. Burns's first husband must've been investigated by Dan Dunn.

    Note the Tribune lining up with Col. Lindbergh. Colonel McCormick will be a leading figure in bankrolling the America First movement, with Lindbergh as its marquee speaker in the months ahead.
     
  7. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    It is no great wonder...if in the long process of time...coincidences should spontaneously occur.

    Plutarch, Plutarch's Lives; Vol II


    I fondly recall a Special Forces comment I once posted; and, a very quick on the draw, subsequent
    splendid post with a Girl Scout photo; just adorable. I loved it. Yet, I wondered if a bartender was
    peeking over my shoulder, so quick was the quip. ...And now a Pari mutuel simultaneous remark,
    typed at the bottom, not the top. And perfect timing. Not that I am suspicious or anything, but as a
    speculator professional horse player all facets handicap coincidence threads need to be tied. ;)
     
  8. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Heh. I used to make a living ad-libbing jokes, and when you get a perfect setup, it's a conditioned reflex.
     
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  9. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    A conditioned coincidental reflex. Understood. Caught you Lizzie....:D I'm just kidding.;)
     
  10. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Re the pari mutuel jokes - well done all.

    Somewhat related, I was thinking more about it and I'm not sure if my Dad got the name from the friend later or at the track that day as my mother has told me a few versions - one where she gave my dad the number directly and one where she gave it to a friend to give to him either that day at the track or later. My mom wasn't intentionally changing the story, I just think her memory got fuzzier over the years.

    They met at the track and my dad was on a date - those seem pretty solid facts, the rest, as you can tell, is probably lost to memory issues.
     
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  11. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    It is a sweet, heartwarming story-all the more so because of my long absence from the track.
    Professional conflicts; cataract surgery, and Covid ripped the calendar and tore apart last season.
    This current year hasn't started for me yet and a snowstorm is on the way. I am staying with relatives
    for awhile, away from my library, and aside from several selections brought along all the house books
    read New York Times liberal illiteracy. Found Obama's latest tour de force (politik verboten, klar) on
    a living room chair this morning....almost dropped my coffee cup.... This would be an ideal opportunity
    to reread Teweles, Burke, Hamilton. Thankfully I can check the horses out online.:)
     
  12. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Two American diplomats who saw the Nazi invader crush France and Norway told Congress yesterday that full and prompt aid to Great Britain is necessary to save America from Axis domination. William C. Bullit, former U. S. Ambassador to France, and Mrs. Daisy Harriman, the minister to Norway, testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee in support of President Roosevelt's proposed Lease-Lend program for aid to Britain. Expressing views strongly contrary to those expressed this week in opposition to the bill by Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, Mr. Bullitt told the committee that, equipped with American weaponry but without the assistance of American troops, he believes that Britain is capable of defeating Germany. Mrs. Harriman, who fled Norway under a hail of Nazi bombs, described the German treachery in that country and pleaded for passage of the bill as "an aid to those nations who still fight for liberty."

    A Belgrade correspondent for the Columbia Broadcasting System was quoted last night in a CBS broadcast as reporting German soldiers had shot three high-ranking Italian military officers following anti-Mussolini street rioting in Milan. Correspondent Winston Burdett, who is also the associate editor of the Eagle's Sunday Trend section, cited foreign diplomatic sources in the Yugoslavian capital as his source for the report. The report stated that German troops took over the Milan railway station, the telephone central office, and the post office, and established security points at major industrial plants in the Italian city, with Fascist Party blackshirts said to be aiding the Nazi forces in suppressing the rebellion.

    The Rapp-Coudert Committee yesterday demanded that New York City School Superintendent Harold G. Campbell take disciplinary action against Teachers Union President Charles Hendley over Mr. Hendley's refusal to hand over the union's membership roster. A warrant for Mr. Hendley's arrest was issued on Friday after the union leader was found in contempt of the Legislature for refusing to turn over the list.

    A Queens workman was slowly sucked to his death in a 200-ton heap of coal yesterday in the basement of a Manhattan office building. 32-year-old John Seery of Flushing, employed as a fireman at the New York Life Insurance Building at 51 Madison Avenue, slipped and fell down a coal chute while supervising a fuel delivery. When his body struck the fine buckwheat coal he began to sink into the pile of fuel as though it were quicksand. Men dug into the pile to try and keep Seery from becoming completely engulfed by the coal, and attempts were made to protect him from the weight of the coal with a wooden barrel and a metal ash can, but both were crushed under the weight of the fuel. Before Seery vanished completely into the pile, a doctor gave him an injection to numb the pain, and a priest summoned to the scene administered the last rites. The worker's dead body was finally extracted from the coal heap five hours after he fell down the chute.

    A man earning $22 a week may be ordered to pay $20 of that in alimony in an acrimonious divorce case now pending in Brooklyn Supreme Court. Mrs. Bertha M. Lewis of 1212 Ocean Avenue, a $44-a-week accountant for the city's Legal Department, accused her husband Sidney L. Lewis, automotive speciality salesman, of being a parasite who refuses to better himself. Mr. Lewis charges that Mrs. Lewis has humiliated him by earning more money than he does, but Mrs. Lewis maintains that Mr. Lewis refuses to take any steps to secure a better job, noting that he has failed twice in efforts to operate businesses of his own. Mr. Lewis further stated that Mrs. Lewis has refused to comply with his request that she quit her job and move with him to Florida, where the firm for which he sells is based, but Mrs. Lewis, pointing to his long record of financial irresponsibility, argued that even working in Florida he has failed to meet his obligations to his son. The matter of alimony will be settled when the case actually comes to trial.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(1).jpg
    (Spring is coming! Get your joints loose!)

    Henry "Tony" Skau of Elmhurst is the unquestioned king of the celebrity autograph hounds, with several thousand signatures to his credit -- and he attributes the success of his hunting to his special technique. Rather than sending a blank sheet of paper or an index card to his celebrity targets, Tony instead encloses an original sketch of the personality involved and invites them to sign it. "Sometimes I have to send the sketch ten or twelve times," he says, "but eventually they break down." Tony's forty-year collection, which he values in excess of $2000, includes not just the usual show-business and political personalities -- ranging from Charlie Chaplin and Sonja Henie to George Bernard Shaw and the late Queen Marie of Rumania -- but also more notorious figures from the news. Tony's favorite signature is that of the late mobster "Legs" Diamond, whose signature he obtained by sending a sketch to the tupstate town where the notorious gunman was reported to be hiding out. A few days later he was pleasantly surprised to receive the signed sketch back by return mail.

    Old Timer Arnold Ricardo remembers the days of the Gay 90s, when he and every other self-respecting gentleman went forth in the hottest weather in heavy dark suits, high socks and high black shoes, and high stiff collars -- often with a cotton handkerchief between collar and neck to absorb the perspiration. Mr. Ricardo remembers the controversy when men first appeared in the streets with cuffs on their trousers, and the astonishing variety of whiskers that blossomed forth from the male face in those days -- muttonchops, Imperials, Van Dykes, chin-curtains, sideboards, goatees, and long steerhorn or handle-bar moustaches.

    The Eagle Editorialist expresses sympathy for Farmingdale hamburger man Peter Lanies, who is in conflict with the aircraft firm where he maintains his stand and the Long Island Rail Road over the construction of a rail spur that would obliterate the space where he parks his car. The EE bows to no one in his admiration of the hamburger, whether served on a plate smothered in mushrooms or between halves of a fresh-baked roll, but in these times of crisis National Defense must come first.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(2).jpg "I Have Seen The Future."

    "Disillusioned," age 24, writes in to Helen Worth to complain that married life with her husband, age 27, isn't what she expected. The honeymoon is over, and the routine has set in -- but what ever happened to romance? Her husband comes home from work, takes a nap, eats dinner, takes another nap, listens to the radio for a while, and goes to sleep. And she herself washes the dishes, reads a book, listens to the radio, and goes to sleep. Night after night after night. "Should I leave him?" Helen says, well, this is what marriage is. Maybe you can talk him to going out to the movies once a week, and maybe you can convince him to have friends over another night. Most of all remember that it takes years to build a good marriage, not months.

    Detroit Tigers catcher George "Birdie" Tebbetts has been cleared of assault charges stemming from an incident late last season in Cleveland. As fans hurled garbage onto the field during a game between the Indians and Tigers, Mr. Tebbetts went into the stands after he was struck by a particularly well-aimed spoiled tomato, and punched the man who threw it. A Cleveland judge threw out the case, declaring that when spectators go to the game with a load of missiles ready to throw, "it's more than these young players can stand."

    Football Dodgers owner Dan Topping has taken his physical examination for the Army, and expects to be called up shortly for military service. Mr. Topping has a low draft number, and is one of the most prominent sports figures likely to be taken this year under the conscription law. The grid impresario is married to skating film star Sonja Heine, and the fact that she has independent means of support means that he has already been assured of a 1-A draft classification.

    Joe Louis's fight this Friday night against Red Burman will be the first in a series of title defenses extending thru June. The heavyweight champion is booked for fights in February, March, April, and June -- and in the unlikely event that Burman should unseat Louis, the contract for the upcoming bout stipulates that a return match must be held within sixty days.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(3).jpg ("Scrappy were his relations" = "refused so much as to speak to Jews.")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(4).jpg
    (Now that's a cast. Tune in here.)

    This week at the Patio, it's Sabu and Conrad Veidt -- speaking of a cast -- in "The Thief of Bagdad" paired with Ann Sothern in "Dulcy."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(5).jpg (Bigfoot as a radical conservationist? Well, it makes sense.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(6).jpg (I thought the rule of super powers is that they don't work when you're unconscious but clearly I have been misinformed.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(7).jpg (Tommy Dorsey, Jack Teagarden, Will Bradley, and Glenn Miller all agree not to visit Germany. Oh, and whoever's shooting the microfilm here, try f/4.0)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(8).jpg ("I don't wanna be comedy relief anymore. Oh for the sweet peace of the grave.")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(9).jpg ("A few weeks ago? You mean last summer?")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(10).jpg ("Disillusioned" puts aside the newspaper and decides to leave her husband after all.)
     
  13. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(1).jpg "Poopsie?"

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(2).jpg AWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(3).jpg Yeah, well, Mr. Resourceful Engineer, I wouldn't want to be you when the Fluffy Suds rep shows up demanding a make-good.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(4).jpg Jeez, Warbucks, you can't just walk in the door like a normal guy. Always you gotta make an Entrance.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(5).jpg Today's guest director, Mr. D. W. Griffith.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(6).jpg Better have an extra glass of Dari-Rich today, kid.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(7).jpg
    You never see pea shooters anymore. Kids don't know what they're missing.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(8).jpg OK, that's funny.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(9).jpg Psst, Walt -- get a haircut.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(10).jpg Truth is spoken here -- we've hosted society gala-type events at the theatre where the mothball aroma will knock you off your feet.
     
  14. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Justice MacReynolds' anti-Semitism and refusal to befriend his colleagues Cardozo, Brandeis,
    and Frankfurter reveal more than a strict constructionist mindset. It marks a knave fool robed jester.
    As Camus was to later remark, Silk hides eczema.
     
  15. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    That is a uniquely horrible story.


    It sounds as if she should be paying alimony to him - at least that's how it would look today.


    There's a bunch of Golden Era stuff packed into this small story.


    There's got to be more to the honey-feet-sock story or that bed becomes a holy mess every night (and not in a good way).


    Being a new and Sunday-only strip, I forget about this one from week to week. "Sparky Watts" was smart to do six days and not Sunday versus only Sunday to launch as it keeps it in front of you so much more often.


    What about the big kiss Hu Shee gave Terry just before she left. Terry seems to be ignoring the significance of that.


    Agree, that was well done.
     
  16. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Read my thought. The kid acts like a teenager-in-love miscast for this strip tease.
     
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  17. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The Teachers Union has surrendered its membership rolls to the Rapp-Coudert Committee after threats of dismissal were lodged against union president Charles Handley by the city superintendant of schools. Hendley, a high school teacher, surrendered the membership lists today to Paul Windel and Philip W. Haberman, counsel for the legislative committee investigating political subversion in the public schools, and indicated that he will testify as demanded before that committee. Dr. Harold G. Campbell, school superintendant, stated today that he has documents charging Hendley with "conduct unbecoming a teacher," and threatened to prosecute the teacher according to those documents unless he is advised by Windel and Haberman that Hendley has "met all requirements of the probers."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_.jpg

    Heavy snow and sleet will continue to pelt Brooklyn all thru tonight after a day of foul weather dropped over two inches of snow and ice on the borough, accumulating on the residue of the ice and slush left behind by last week's storm. Nearly four thousand Sanitation Department workers are on the job today in an attempt to clear the streets and transit lines, and while no outside workers have been hired yet, city officials say if the storm worsens, it is possible that cleanup work may be offered to all comers. Temperatures are expected to remain around the freezing point thru tomorrow.

    The $10,000,000 super-drydock to be constructed by the U. S. Navy will be built at Bayonne, New Jersey, disappointing those who had campaigned to bring the project to the Brooklyn waterfront. New Jersey Governor Charles Edison announced the decision today, confirming that he had personally lobbied to bring the drydock to his state while he was serving as Secretary of the Navy. Mr. Edison resigned that cabinet post last spring in order to run for the office of Governor, to which he was elected last fall. A committee appointed by Brooklyn borough president John Cashmore had also lobbied for the project, but its presentation came up short.

    Brooklyn magistrate Charles Solomon was in a gloomy mood today as the defendant in a separation case. "I guess we've both suffered," declared the usually-cheerful official, who added that he and his estranged wife Laura have been "supporting lawyers and printers" over the course of their long and unhappy case. Today Mrs. Solomon took the stand to testify in the separation hearing, and told Justice John McCrate that she was willing to be reconciled to her husband, but that he doesn't want her. "Do you love him?" asked the Justice. "I can't say," replied Mrs. Solomon.

    Wendell Willkie had lunch with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill today, and is expected to review British airplane production with a view toward working to coordinate it with that of the United States. The meetings come as new rumors swirl around the 1940 Republican Presidential nominee and the possibility he may be offered a war-production post within the Roosevelt Administration.

    A sixty-year-old Sanitation Department worker from Glendale was rescued today after falling into a sixty-foot-deep former incinerator pit in Woodside, now being used to store rock salt. Conrad Schmitt fell into the black chasm while helping to load salt to be used by snow-removal workers, and was pulled out by two firemen who were lowered into the pit on ropes. Schmitt suffered a fractured skull in the fall, and is reported in critical condition at St. John's Hospital in Long Island City.

    In Mexico City, a bullfight was disrupted yesterday by a raucous American woman who threw three pairs of colored panties at the matador. Carlos Arruza, matador, had just dispatched the bull when, to the accompaniment of the roars of the crowd, a young woman raced down from the grandstand to the edge of the ring, and pulled off three pairs of underpants -- colored red, white, and blue -- and flung them into his face. Police attempted to stop the woman, but the crowd shouted them down. The matador declared that he did not know the young woman, and her identity remains a mystery.

    (Has anybody seen Sylvia Ageloff lately?)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_.jpg
    (Yeah, there's a flu epidemic coming, and nobody needs your germs.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(1).jpg
    (And the prize for best comeback goes to dear little Jane Withers. Go get 'em, kid.)

    When producer George Abbott needed a sinister-looking mug to play the role of a heavy in his current production of "Pal Joey," he tapped a fellow named Jack Durant for the part -- only to be shocked during rehearsals to find the actor casually doing backflips backstage. Turns out that Mr. Abbott clearly didn't spend much time in vaudeville theatres, because anyone who used to go to the three-a-days knows that Jack Durant is the Durant of Mitchell and Durant, famed comedy-acrobatic team of years gone by. Mr. Abbott clearly doesn't pay much attention to the movies, either, since Mitchell and Durant made several pictures for Fox before breaking up the act.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(2).jpg
    (Ah for the days of the friendly neighborhood butcher.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(3).jpg ("Boy," says Joe, "I'm glad I don'like hockey! Imagine rootin' f't'ese bums." "Howcum'at Toppin' don't buy 'em out?" wonders Sally. "Sonja could play!")

    The Yankees, seeking to regain their footing in the American League after last year's disappointments, will have an advantage courtesy of the schedule-maker, with the Bronx boys opening the season against weak opposition. The Yanks will bow on April 14th in the Presidential Opener at Washington, and will then return to New York for three games against the Philadelphia Athletics. Following that, they'll go back to Washington for another series with the Senators. They'll end the season in much the same way, with the A's and Nats in town for a final six-game September homestand.

    Joe Louis won't have much time to relax over the next few months, with a steady rat-a-tat schedule of title defenses on his schedule thru the spring. The Brown Bomber is training on a five-day-a-week schedule for Friday night's bout against Red Burman, and doesn't expect to let up the pace much for the fights to follow.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(4).jpg
    ("Ehhh," says Maggie. "It's a livin'.")

    Arturo Toscanini opens his 1941 season at the podium of the NBC Symphony this coming Saturday night over WJZ, with Mozart's Serenade in B Flat, Haydn's Symphony in E Flat Major (Op. 69), and Richard Strauss's best-known tone poem Ein Heidenlaben. The orchestra will be made up for the occasion of more than 100 musicians.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(5).jpg (Hey, Mary Worth! Got another case for ya!)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(6).jpg
    (Yeah, well, little does she realize George is already an experienced time traveler. He has traveled into the far future to become the abject love thrall of an imperious outer-space queen, and he has also been to 1950 -- where Jo and Peggy are happily going on with their lives without him. So buck up, kid -- your deliverance may be at hand.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(7).jpg (How dumb is dumb here? You barely know the man, and when you do get to know him, you won't be too impressed. Go talk to Dennie and ask him where his dad was when he was little and living in the street.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(8).jpg (Of course, we know Hogan isn't really dead. It's all been faked so he can be picked up by a British sub and taken to Europe where he'll head a secret commando team behind the German lines. LeBeau and Kinch are already over there waiting for him.)
     
  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_.jpg Ah, the whittling guy. I wondered how they were getting along. And as for Baron Blitzkrieg there, the only thing worse than a Nazi is a *grinning* Nazi.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(1).jpg
    "What, Benny a hairdresser? With that cat-hair toupee? Every time Benny sees a dog, his scalp arches!" -- Fred Allen.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(2).jpg
    Gawdawmighty.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(3).jpg What's the dog smirking about? HE KNOWS MORE THAN HE LETS ON.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(4).jpg Smallville? Say hello to the Kents when you get there.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(5).jpg "Bull Moose sad! Bull Moose want Dari-Rich!"

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(6).jpg "Get A Lift -- With A Camel!"

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(7).jpg Everybody hates Wilmer.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(8).jpg Mind on your work, kids.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_27__1941_(9).jpg When Moon and Mush first met, Mush was Jack Dempsey's sparring partner, and went on to have a pretty fair career of his own in the ring. Moon himself has also fought a few bouts. And Mush is just thinking there how much he'd enjoy taking a shot at him right now.
     
  19. PrivateEye

    PrivateEye New in Town

    Messages:
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    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_26__1941_(4).jpg

    It's a great cast, and a good listen.

    It's available on YouTube if you want to check it out.
     
  20. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Having had a grandfather who lived in Bayonne that we'd visit in the early '70s, I can report that whatever economic and social benefits Bayonne gained from the $10,000,000 project in the '40s, they were all gone by the early '70s as Bayonne was a depressed, almost bomb-out-like wasteland by then.


    This one had a worrisome echo of yesterday's horrible story about the man who was killed when he fell down a coal chute.


    Or Gerta Rozen, the actress who stripped in protest because she couldn't get hired in Hollywood. But to be fair, you're right Lizzie, this one is more in Sylvia's bailiwick.


    Miss Landis from "One Billion B.C." begs to differ as she says, "The Harvard Lampoon doesn't understand the nuance of what would come to be known as 'camp'." How she knows that word in 1940 was not explained.
    Annex - Landis, Carole (One Million B.C.)_04.jpg


    :)


    For some people, men and women, some kind of internal bell goes off, at some point in their lives, that tells them they have to marry now and they respond by marrying whoever is somewhat reasonable and available at the time.


    Seriously.


    It's just nice to see the titular star of the strip actually be the center of attention for once.


    Despite everything in the past, my opinion of Mr. Wumple just shot up.


    Finally. But again, Lana could do so much better.
     
    Harp likes this.

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