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The Era -- Day By Day

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(7).jpg

("TWELVE PERNTS f' dried beef inna jawr?" gasps Joe. "An' HOWMENNY jawrs of it do we have?" "I dunno whatcha tawkin' about," shrugs Sally. "We jus' had t'at one jawr yest'day. Whatcha t'ink, I'm a HOARDEH a'sump'n?" "But you said ya ma..." "I din' say she give us t' whole case," clarifies Sally. "She jus' give us t'one jawr," "Well, what's she gonna do wit' twenny-t'ree jawrs'a chip beef?" "Well, she might sen' a few t'Mickey." "MICKEY!" roars Joe. "He's EATIN' REAL MEAT! Whas'hee want wit' jawrs a' chip beef? Chip beef is t'one t'ing t'Awrmy got nut'n else but!" "Well," shrugs Sally once more, "Ma says he c'n put'm t'use, y'know, tradin'm f'stuff he wants. T'at's what t'ey do inna Awrmy. Cig'rettes t'ey trade, an' canny bawrs t'ey trade, an' cans an' jawrs'a meat t'ey trade." "Well, whas'see get out of it f' TWELVE PERNTS woit' a meat inna jawr?" "I dunno," Sally shrugs further. "I bet I do," grumbles Joe. "What?" "Nut'n.")

MIners and operators in the Northern Appalachian soft coal region today agreed to extend negotiations in their current wage dispute for thirty days, with the understanding that any subsequent agreement reached would apply retroactively from April 1st, when a new contract is due. The agreement signed by John L. Lewis for the United Mine Workers, Charles A. O'Neill, spokesman for the operators, and other members of the negotiating subcommittee was in accordance with the request from President Roosevelt that conferees continue negotiations and avoid a shutdown of the mines when the present contract expires on March 31st. The meetings are continuing at the Hotel Biltmore. O'Neill stated today that the talks will continue today on the terms of twelve proposals submitted by the UMW, including the request for a $2 per day wage increase.

Mayor LaGuardia, taking time out today from his budget-retreat labors, predicted a city tax rate of $2.78 on each $100 in assessed value of real estate for the next fiscal year, but only if Albany acts favorably on his request for power to impose additional local taxes. If the Legislature rejects that request, however, the Mayor warned that there will be a "disastrous" 20 percent boost in the property tax from the present $2.73 per $100 to $2.90. The Mayor told reporters early this morning that he has sent to the Joint Legislative Committee before which he appeared yesterday facts and figures in support of the tax plan he and Controller Joseph D. McGoldrick have developed and proposed to the committee. Along with those figures, he warned that the city is facing a budget deficit for the next fiscal year of $49,000,000, and declared "as to all the people who have been loud-mouthing about economy, I will make monkeys out of them before I'm through."

A draft of boys between the ages of 14 and 16 for emergency farm labor in Nassau County was declared "essential" yesterday by Chairman Arthur Youngs of the Nassau County Agricultural War Board, following completiion of a survey of farmers which concluded that spring planting is being delayed for want of labor. Mr. Youngs stated that "war emergency certificates" will be prepared and issued to various county schools authorizing them as required by law to release boys aged 14, 15, and 16 from classes to serve fifteen-day stints in the fields. The committee stressed that participation in the program by individual boys will be "purely voluntary," and that in most cases farmers have put in requests for boys they personally know to be willing and capable of such field work. Schoolboys drafted for the program will be put to work cutting seed potatoes and putting out cabbage and cauliflower plants. The emergency program will continue thru the end of the school year in June, but the committee warned that there will be further need for schoolboy labor during the fall harvest season.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(8).jpg

("Under further investigation, the Japanese agent was revealed to be a disguised American, who gave his name as J. Hartford Oakdale, and who claimed to be on a top-secret undercover mission for the intelligence service of an unidentified Allied nation. "Disguise is one of my many accomplishments," declared the suspect, who appeared to be dressed in a uniform made over from that of a Loew's theatre usher. An interrogating officer, Col. Geo. B. Bungle, declared himself satisfied with the man's story, and immediately left with him for lunch.")

The latest racket to vex the people of Brooklyn and Queens involves the theft of baby carriages, which are then repainted by the racketeers and resold as new. The Brooklyn Eagle has learned that "several hundred" perambulators have been stolen in recent weeks in the two boroughs, but police say that their efforts to run down the thieves are being made more difficult by a lack of cooperation from the public. "Sure we know these baby carriages are being lifted," commented a police lieutenant. "But what's the use? We hear about it in a roundabout way. The mothers seem to figure 'what's the use, it's gone' and don't make a report." Another police officer speculated that many victims of these thefts suspect their carriages have been taken by neighbors, and don't report them for fear of causing "neighborhood squabbles." Police are now reported to be carefully watching carriages in all precincts. On Flatbush Avenue this morning, a man pushing a baby carriage was stopped by a patrolman who checked to make sure than an actual baby was inside, and doormen in Borough Park, where the greatest number of thefts have occured, are being questioned. It is common in medium-income apartment houses in that district for tenants to pay doormen so much per night to "watch their carriages." Meanwhile, the manufacture of the traditional steel-framed carriage has been entirely terminated due to the war, with the replacement "victory carriage," made entirely out of wood, is being produced at a 75 percent reduction compared to the number manufactured of the previous type.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(9).jpg

("Of course we're beefin' about it! It's the only beef we've got!")

Ration-conscious burglars raided a Safeway supermarket in the Bronx last night, breaking in thru a skylight and escaping with thirty-six one-pound cans of coffee, five 32-pound tubs of butter, and two cartons of cigarettes.

Paramount Pictures has purchased, in galley form, James M. Cain's forthcoming novel "Double Indemnity" for filming next year. The novel, by the best-selling author of "The Postman Always Rings Twice" and "Serenade," is a melodrama dealing with two people who endeavor to commit "the perfect crime."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(10).jpg

(That's our Harold!)

The Eagle Editorialist warns that "we still have a lot to learn about air raid warnings," if yesterday's performance during the surprise early morning drill is any indication. "Too many of us reached out and turned on the light switch, which is just what we are NOT to do when the sirens sound."

Two hundred and fifty CIO shop stewards will return to their factories in Michigan today determined to "really sweat" to get out the war materiels, after completing their three-day taste of Army life. The United Auto Workers members concluded their experience in the life of buck privates at Camp Atterbury, Indiana last night, in a program arranged thru the War Department by UAW President Walter Reuther. The war workers further pledged to raise $10,000 for recreational equipment for real doughboys overseas.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(12).jpg

(Mr. Rickey is the only man in baseball who calls Mr. Newsom "Louie." Oh, and "Leo, a really clever hand with the billiard cue?" Tell us what you really mean, Mr. Parrott.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(13).jpg

("Gee, I hope she can read a subway map. Oh well, that's one way to solve the problem.")

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("LOOK IT'S THAT GHOST CAR AGAIN!")

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(Dan? Even worse, it's an air raid warden! PUT OUT THAT LIGHT!)

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(THAT'S IT I'M RENEGOTIATING MY CONTRACT)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(17).jpg

(AVOID THE PASSIVE VOICE.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News....

Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_.jpg

You'll have a hard time with the butterleggers. They're slippery.

Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(2).jpg

"They could be killed?" Hmph, that's nothing -- did you ever play Poughkeepsie?

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What? They're still alive down there? You're slipping, kid.

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"Chianti bottles."

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"No, no, I don't mean Andy." And said with a perfectly blank face, too.

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How is it that his hat hasn't blown off? Spirit gum?

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"Wait, I just remembered I have another daughter! Hey, where'd she go?"

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Priorities.

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All in a day's work.

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Yes, do report her. Maybe they'll send Irwin to investigate!
 
Messages
17,009
Location
New York City
("TWELVE PERNTS f' dried beef inna jawr?" gasps Joe. "An' HOWMENNY jawrs of it do we have?" "I dunno whatcha tawkin' about," shrugs Sally. "We jus' had t'at one jawr yest'day. Whatcha t'ink, I'm a HOARDEH a'sump'n?" "But you said ya ma..." "I din' say she give us t' whole case," clarifies Sally. "She jus' give us t'one jawr," "Well, what's she gonna do wit' twenny-t'ree jawrs'a chip beef?" "Well, she might sen' a few t'Mickey." "MICKEY!" roars Joe. "He's EATIN' REAL MEAT! Whas'hee want wit' jawrs a' chip beef? Chip beef is t'one t'ing t'Awrmy got nut'n else but!" "Well," shrugs Sally once more, "Ma says he c'n put'm t'use, y'know, tradin'm f'stuff he wants. T'at's what t'ey do inna Awrmy. Cig'rettes t'ey trade, an' canny bawrs t'ey trade, an' cans an' jawrs'a meat t'ey trade." "Well, whas'see get out of it f' TWELVE PERNTS woit' a meat inna jawr?" "I dunno," Sally shrugs further. "I bet I do," grumbles Joe. "What?" "Nut'n.")
...

Nerves are fraying.


...

A draft of boys between the ages of 14 and 16 for emergency farm labor in Nassau County was declared "essential" yesterday by Chairman Arthur Youngs of the Nassau County Agricultural War Board, following completiion of a survey of farmers which concluded that spring planting is being delayed for want of labor. Mr. Youngs stated that "war emergency certificates" will be prepared and issued to various county schools authorizing them as required by law to release boys aged 14, 15, and 16 from classes to serve fifteen-day stints in the fields. The committee stressed that participation in the program by individual boys will be "purely voluntary," and that in most cases farmers have put in requests for boys they personally know to be willing and capable of such field work. Schoolboys drafted for the program will be put to work cutting seed potatoes and putting out cabbage and cauliflower plants. The emergency program will continue thru the end of the school year in June, but the committee warned that there will be further need for schoolboy labor during the fall harvest season.
...

Do the kids get paid?


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(8).jpg



("Under further investigation, the Japanese agent was revealed to be a disguised American, who gave his name as J. Hartford Oakdale, and who claimed to be on a top-secret undercover mission for the intelligence service of an unidentified Allied nation. "Disguise is one of my many accomplishments," declared the suspect, who appeared to be dressed in a uniform made over from that of a Loew's theatre usher. An interrogating officer, Col. Geo. B. Bungle, declared himself satisfied with the man's story, and immediately left with him for lunch.")
...

I miss "The Bungles" too.

Let's not be too hasty about what we do with this German baker, as putting him to work in his profession under supervision might be the right answer. There are many quite tasty German baked goods (right Trenchfriend?) that he could make for the Allies.


...

Ration-conscious burglars raided a Safeway supermarket in the Bronx last night, breaking in thru a skylight and escaping with thirty-six one-pound cans of coffee, five 32-pound tubs of butter, and two cartons of cigarettes.
...

Even though she lives in NJ, the police, just to make sure, probably did ask my grandmother if she could account for her whereabouts at the time the butter was being stolen.


...

Paramount Pictures has purchased, in galley form, James M. Cain's forthcoming novel "Double Indemnity" for filming next year. The novel, by the best-selling author of "The Postman Always Rings Twice" and "Serenade," is a melodrama dealing with two people who endeavor to commit "the perfect crime."
...

An early flapping of a butterfly's wing in the chain of events that would lead to the making of a film noir classic.
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...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(13).jpg


("Gee, I hope she can read a subway map. Oh well, that's one way to solve the problem.")
...

Yup, if she stands on her feet all day packing crackers for $20 a week for a awhile, she'll be a little less high and mighty about the Sutton Place position.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(16).jpg


(THAT'S IT I'M RENEGOTIATING MY CONTRACT)
...

"This Senate Committee has been tasked with getting to the bottom of the black market in meat and it has no intention of letting Bo hide behind the Fifth Amendment as we demand to find out what did he know and when did he know it!"

"Rut Roh"
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(16).jpg


laughing-laugh.gif


"Hi, I'd like to anonymously submit a GIF to go just beneath 'poor' Bo's picture."
"Sandy, is that you?"
"Shut up!"


And in the Daily News....
Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_.jpg



You'll have a hard time with the butterleggers. They're slippery.
...

Fedora Lounge does have a new three-warnings policy about making bad puns; today it regretfully issued its first warning.

For a Senator's daughter and at a time when this stuff still mattered, Mary Reynolds Farrell doesn't seem too reticent about airing her dirty laundry - no quiet Reno divorce for this girl.


...
Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(2).jpg



"They could be killed?" Hmph, that's nothing -- did you ever play Poughkeepsie?
...

It's surprising that the soldiers, men I thought would think it unfair that entertainers got deferred, don't, overall, feel that way. Instead, they just appreciating the entertainment they provide.


...

Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(3).jpg

What? They're still alive down there? You're slipping, kid.
...

This is like a Tarantino movie.


...

Daily_News_Wed__Mar_24__1943_(5)-2.jpg

"No, no, I don't mean Andy." And said with a perfectly blank face, too.
...

Did we know that Andy had an office to go to? I thought he made his living coming up with stupid plans, losing money in them and then having Bim bail him out.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One Too Many
Messages
1,723
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
Confession. The tele series Big Valley was a hit over here. And Miss Barbara Stanwyck definitely caught my boy eye.
What an elegant refined exquisite rose. And that clip with her shades. Her mystery eyes and beauty.
I know she was married to Robert Taylor for a time. How could a man get over such a woman?

Forgot what I was tuning the dial for striptease way today.
 
Messages
17,009
Location
New York City
Confession. The tele series Big Valley was a hit over here. And Miss Barbara Stanwyck definitely caught my boy eye.
What an elegant refined exquisite rose. And that clip with her shades. Her mystery eyes and beauty.
I know she was married to Robert Taylor for a time. How could a man get over such a woman?

Forgot what I was tuning the dial for striptease way today.

My introduction to Miss Stanwyck was when, as a kid, I watched "The Big Valley" on repeats in the 1970s. I thought she was such a cool Mom. It was only later, when I stared watching old movies that I discovered that she had been a huge star in the '30s and '40s.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_25__1943_.jpg

("Well," says Joe, "I guess ya ma otta be happy bout t'at." "What, about jury duty?" replies Sally. "She don' have no wawr job, t'at don' apply to her. B'sides, she says it's'eh civic duty to go on a jury if t'ey cawl'eh." "No," returns Joe, "I don'mean t'at." "About t' meat riot? Nah, she don' go in f'nut'n like t'at. She'll make do wit' chip beef, she's willin' t'do'eh pawrt f't wawr eff'et." "I don' mean *t'at," insists Joe. "Oh, I see, yeh, I hope he's right." "Who's right?" "Stimson. Well, not abou't'heavy casualties a' nu'tn, but about t'vict'ry, yeah. I mean, Solly's oveh t'eah, anney might sen' Mickey oveh t'eah." "Look, I ain' tawkin' 'bout none'a t'at," huffs Joe. "Well, what AWR ya tawkin' about?" "I don' remembeh," sighs Joe "Ah," replies Sally. "Y'know, you otta get moeh sleep, it's messin witcha concentration. Hey, how 'bout t'is bingo t'ing?")

The Red Army reported today that a week-long German offensive against the upper Donets line has failed to carry across the river, and that Soviet positions are intact everywhere along a broad arc east of Kharkov. Meanwhile, British military observers stated that indications are already increasing that the Russians are massing forces for a tremendous spring offensive along the whole length of the front from Leningrad to the Caucasus. German broadcasts told of "large groups" of Soviet troops forming in the forests near Kharkov, perhaps in preparation for a new drive to recapture that important base.

Prime Minister Winston Churchill told the House of Commons today that the United Nations have substantially larger fleets afloat now than they had at the worst moment of the U-Boat war, and that this improvement is continuing. Mr. Churchill had been asked by Rear Admiral Tufton P. T. Beamish whether he was aware that Germans claim U-Boats sank more than 30 ships totalling 200,000 tons from a recent convoy in the Atlantic. "All sorts of claims are made by the German radio," replied the Prime Minister, "and they would like very much to know just how far adrift they are from the truth, but nothing would induce me, while I am responsible, to clarify the enemy knowledge on this matter."

Spreading revolts among 6,000,000 war prisoners and conscripted foreign laborers now in Germany are creating a serious problem for the Nazis on the home front, it is reported today in high diplomatic quarters. Thousands of prisoners are said to have escaped, and are now preying on Germans, in some cases terrorizing whole towns. Hatred of their Nazi captors and hunger have driven the escaped foreigners to "desperate measures," if only to sustain themselves. The Germans have responded with savagery, but the escapes continue.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_25__1943_(1).jpg

(Lots has changed since the last time they sent you up, pal.)

A four-alarm fire swept thru a paint factory in the Navy Yard district today, spreading into a neighboring optical plant and disrupting war production at both factories. Workers at the Peerless Paint and Varnish Corporation, 391-397 Flushing Avenue, were eating lunch when the first of a series of explosions rocked the building from a metal shed used to store rectifying oil used in the manufacture of paints. The flames quickly spread, feeding on the highly-inflammable oils, shooting more than 50 feet in the air and igniting the neighboring five-story building of the Kollmorgen Optical Company. Hundreds of Navy Yard workers, just coming off the 4 AM to noon shift, were attracted by the flames, and trolley lines along Flushing Avenue, which run directly in front of the plant, had to be rerouted. Efforts to fight the fire were hampered by exploding barrels of paint, and firemen coated in white paint were seen running along Flushing and Kent Avenues at the height of the fire. The streets themselves, and much of the firefighting apparatus dispatched to the scene, were also doused in paint.

Most of the 4000 kosher butcher shops in New York City will be forced to close from noon tomorrow until 7 AM Monday in an effort to rebuild their stocks. An announcement by the Federation of Kosher Butchers of Greater New York indicated that the supply of kosher meat is expected to run out tonight.

The continuing meat shortage leading up to the start of rationing will also mean reductions in the amounts that may be served by restaurants. The Office of Price Administration indicated that limits as low as 2 1/2 ounces per serving may be imposed on a voluntary basis by restaurant operators, and restaurants may also limit the serving of meat to specific hours, may add additional meatless days, or may choose to open only six days a week.

Zoos, animal shelters, and veterinary hospitals are also feeling the meat shortage. Directors of such institutions are feeding unrationed chicken and fish, dog meat, and vegetable juices to supplement what remains of the available supply of beef and horse meat.

With the Works Progress Administration set to go out of existence, so also will the WPA school lunch program, which is scheduled to terminate on April 22nd. The WPA had provided personnel to staff school kitchens and serve school lunches across New York State, but with the agency's coming dissolution, school districts wishing to continue to serve lunches will be required to establish their own programs to do so. As of this week, one-fifth of all school pupils in the street are served a hot meal at noon, and over a quarter of a million pupils from needy families receive this meal free. State Senator Thomas C. Desmond, chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Nutrition, calls this program too valuable to end, and has called upon women's clubs statewide to help fill the gap left by the WPA by volunteering in their local schools to prepare and serve the noon meal.

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(And if you don't observe Lent, now's a good time to start.)

The Star Theatre, Fulton, Jay, and Smith Streets, will reopen tomorrow with a new policy. Formerly a burlesque house, the Star will now offer a program of double feature films with selected short subjects. The opening presentation will be "Pools of Desire," with Walter Pidgeon and Joan Bennett, and co-feature "Manhunt," starring Roddy McDowell. A new stooge comedy will also be shown along with other shorts. The Star will operate on a continuous-shows basis at popular prices from 10:30 AM to 11 PM.

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("Yeah, well, nertz to that. Hey, c'mon -- let's bowl!")

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(It's not nice to make fun of old people.)

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("Ask for Tommy!")

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(These new "Victory Pokers" are terrible, look how they bend.)

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(OW! MY SCIATICA!)

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(SOMETHING'S ROTTEN HERE)

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(Wow, that Marine training works miracles.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Thu__Mar_25__1943_.jpg
Didn't the Eagle have the story of the Breen boys a few weeks ago? I think the Page Four editor got drafted.

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All mustard and no steak.

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"HA HA SUCKERS!" *turns on water anyway*

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"HA HA! HEY TRACY, HOW'S YOUR EARS?" -- Little Face.

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NICE MOUSTACHE, BUMLEY

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"Hand me that compass." "Oh wait, it's in my shirt pocket." "You're not wearing a shirt." "Oh."

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"But they're so CUTE!"

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"I forgot a rattlesnake will strike even when it's in a cage!" -- Little Orphan Annie.

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"Really? I hadn't noticed."

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Venture capital.
 
Messages
17,009
Location
New York City
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_25__1943_.jpg

("Well," says Joe, "I guess ya ma otta be happy bout t'at." "What, about jury duty?" replies Sally. "She don' have no wawr job, t'at don' apply to her. B'sides, she says it's'eh civic duty to go on a jury if t'ey cawl'eh." "No," returns Joe, "I don'mean t'at." "About t' meat riot? Nah, she don' go in f'nut'n like t'at. She'll make do wit' chip beef, she's willin' t'do'eh pawrt f't wawr eff'et." "I don' mean *t'at," insists Joe. "Oh, I see, yeh, I hope he's right." "Who's right?" "Stimson. Well, not abou't'heavy casualties a' nu'tn, but about t'vict'ry, yeah. I mean, Solly's oveh t'eah, anney might sen' Mickey oveh t'eah." "Look, I ain' tawkin' 'bout none'a t'at," huffs Joe. "Well, what AWR ya tawkin' about?" "I don' remembeh," sighs Joe "Ah," replies Sally. "Y'know, you otta get moeh sleep, it's messin witcha concentration. Hey, how 'bout t'is bingo t'ing?")
...

So what is a clergyman doing with, in 2023 dollars, just under $1,000,000 in cash on his person? Something not right is going on here.

The Soviet nurse should have shot as many Nazis as she could have first and then taken her own life. Annie would've played it that way.


...

A four-alarm fire swept thru a paint factory in the Navy Yard district today, spreading into a neighboring optical plant and disrupting war production at both factories. Workers at the Peerless Paint and Varnish Corporation, 391-397 Flushing Avenue, were eating lunch when the first of a series of explosions rocked the building from a metal shed used to store rectifying oil used in the manufacture of paints. The flames quickly spread, feeding on the highly-inflammable oils, shooting more than 50 feet in the air and igniting the neighboring five-story building of the Kollmorgen Optical Company. Hundreds of Navy Yard workers, just coming off the 4 AM to noon shift, were attracted by the flames, and trolley lines along Flushing Avenue, which run directly in front of the plant, had to be rerouted. Efforts to fight the fire were hampered by exploding barrels of paint, and firemen coated in white paint were seen running along Flushing and Kent Avenues at the height of the fire. The streets themselves, and much of the firefighting apparatus dispatched to the scene, were also doused in paint.
...

"Efforts to fight the fire were hampered by exploding barrels of paint." Jesus.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Mar_25__1943_(3).jpg


("Yeah, well, nertz to that. Hey, c'mon -- let's bowl!")
...

If you started working before direct deposit took off in the 1990s, you remember those signs "Pay Checks Cashed" in places of business and "We Don't Cash Paychecks" signs too.

If you didn't live through it, it's hard to appreciate that getting your paycheck cashed could be a hassle. Especially since many companies paid late on a Friday, meaning you'd need to find a bank open on Saturday. And the lines at a bank on Saturday (usually only opened till noon) were brutal.

The amount of time one spent in a bank back then is another thing no one misses.


And in the Daily News...

Didn't the Eagle have the story of the Breen boys a few weeks ago? I think the Page Four editor got drafted.
...

I thought so too, as I know I read about them recently.



...
Daily_News_Thu__Mar_25__1943_(3).jpg


"HA HA SUCKERS!" *turns on water anyway*
...

Nice, Lizzie. But to be fair, they deserve it.

That said, and I probably have the logistics of this confused (as this underground labyrinth is quite confusing), but wouldn't the prisoners be able to "float up" (assuming they can swim) to where Annie is as the water filled up?


...
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"HA HA! HEY TRACY, HOW'S YOUR EARS?" -- Little Face.
...

Can't you picture Gould writing this in a cozy room, wearing a chunky cardigan, sipping a cup of hot coffee and with a roaring fire going in the fireplace?


...

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"Really? I hadn't noticed."
...

Harold could do a lot worse than to marry a smart, pretty and hard-working woman with a wealthy dad who wants a son-in-law in his business. Plus, think how much fun it will be when Cynthia comes back after the band leader screws her over and she tries to steal Harold from Joan.


...
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Venture capital.

Mamie didn't do her due diligence first. Never, ever sign the docs and turn the money over until you've done a thorough due dilligence.

In fairness to her, though, we just saw in the collapse of Sam Bankman-Fried's FTX exchange and investment fund that several "sophisticated" investors, shockingly, had not done their due diligence before investing in his fund.

It's amazing, but it happens time and again. Madoff is the same story.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One Too Many
Messages
1,723
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
So what is a clergyman doing with, in 2023 dollars, just under $1,000,000 in cash on his person? Something not right is going on here.

The Soviet nurse should have shot as many Nazis as she could have first and then taken her own life. Annie would've played it that way.

I read Ms Baldina's heroic story too Fast. And like a film that hits hard leaving much for brain ponder, it's certainly testament to her noble character and sense of honour that she acted selflessly to the end.
For a brief moment she and this German soldier were locked in enmity but she only took her own life, not his or any
one else's, proving herself to him-and I'd wager to all the onlooking Germans.
And I'm curious about this American born nurse who found herself in the web of fate. She reminds me of Taffy,
for whom I share Ms Elizabeth's concern.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_.jpg

("A million poun'sa beef!" exults Joe. "Now we'eh gettin' somwheah." "Well, now, t'ink about t'is," warns Sally. "Fois'off, ya got how many people inna wholea N'Yawrk City -- ya got what, sev'n million? So ya gotta figyeh, t'at's one-sevn't a poun' a poisson. T'at comes t'what, one hamboigeh to a customeh. Annot a big one neiteh, prob'ly one a' t'em lit'l ones y'get at t' White Cas'l." "But wait now," protests Joe. "Not ev'ybody eats meat. Ya got ya people t'at eats ya wheat goim an' eggplants an' awlat -- ya vegetablaraians a'whateveh. An'en y'gotteh figgeh t'at a lotta people is real serious 'bout Lent. Y'gotta figgeh awlem people out of it. T'ey ain' gonna eat none'a t'at meat, annit's gonna leave moeh f't'rest've us." "OK," shrugs Sally. "F't'sake'a awrgyament -- make it a Bickf'ds hamboigeh stead'va White Cas'l. But y'still on'y get jus t'one." "Jus' one?" "Jus' one." "T'at ain' very much." "Hey," shrugs Sally. "Neveh look a gift hawrse inna mout'." "Oh, now," groans Joe. "You don't t'ink it's gonna be..." "Hawrsie!" laughs Leonora. "Giddyup!")

Russian troops have broken thru the primary German fortifications east of Smolensk, and are now reported to be storming the second defense line along an unnamed river west of the Upper Dnieper, reports from the front stated today. Attacking ceaselessly in the converging drive against the keystone base of the second front, the Soviets captured a dominant height beyond the Dnieper and blasted gaps in the German line. Field reports observed heavy fighting all along the new Nazi river line, which was described as heavily fortified and defended by powerful concentrations of artillery.

In Tulsa, Oklahoma the society wife of a powerful oil millionaire was shot to death in a hotel room by another woman whom she had come to the hotel to meet. Mrs. T. K. Simmons, well known nationally as an exhibitor of fine horses, was shot following a struggle with 44-year-old Mrs. E. B. Howard of Fort Worth, Texas over the possession of a 25-caliber pistol, with which, Mrs. Howard told police, Mrs. Simmons had threatened her life. Police found the 55-year-old society matron dead on the floor of Room 926 of the hotel, shot three times by the pistol which they found on a dresser. Police say Mrs. Howard claimed that the gun was fired six times in total, the first two shots fired by Mrs. Simmons at her, and the other four were fired during the struggle over the gun. Mrs. Howard did not give police a reason why Mrs. Simmons would come to her hotel room to threaten her with a pistol, and other than her description of how the shots were fired, she had nothing further to say about the incident.

Kickbacks in the state Workmen's Compensation racket averaged $10,000,000 a year, according to a statement made yesterday by a confidential investigator for the State Insurance Fund. Investigator John F. Symonds, in testimony before Morelands Commissioner William J. Bleakley, stated that he uncovered a "ring of doctors" who were handing to fund employees part of the money which they received for the treatment of injured workers covered by that fund, which carries about 35 percent of Workmen's Compensation insurance for the entire state.

Owners of gasoline stations in Brooklyn, Queens, and Long Island are facing supply difficulties once again, now that the OPA ban on pleasure driving has been lifted. Dealers report increasing problems with supplies despite the fact that the end of the pleasure driving prohibition was accompanied by a halving of the monthly gasoline ration to A-card holders. While acknowledging that the situation is "only temporary," an official of one of Brooklyn's largest service station chains predicted that many operators will be forced to close for want of gasoline to sell. A small percentage of local dealers are already reported as having gone dry.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (1).jpg

(The brands listed all have laminated paper or pressed-fiber cores that can't be ground up for reprocessing. But I'm sure they can find some use for them at Davega.)

Shoppers should beware another meat-racket problem now encountered at some grocers -- the "tie in." It seems that some meat packers are requiring stores to buy quantities of their "by products" in order to also get much-needed meat, and these grocers are forcing these "tie in" items on their own customers in order to recover their loss. For example a packer may require a grocer to buy a quantity of their brand of dog biscuits in order to buy a quantity of hams -- and the grocer, in turn, might require the shopper to buy a box of dog biscuits -- whether or not they have a dog -- in order to get the ham. If the shopper refuses to buy the dog biscuits, the grocer might agree to let them have the meat, but only if they pay a "pro-rata" charge above and beyond the ceiling price of that meat. A racket like that might seem hard to beat -- but the shopper should always keep in mind that she can refuse to buy at all from that merchant.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (2).jpg

(Yum.)

The Eagle Editorialist endorses the Ruml Pay-As-You-Go income tax plan, dismissing opposition claims that it is "immoral" as ridiculous. "Its very simplicity," he asserts, "is believed to annoy the hierarchy of tax experts who seem to like to make such matters as complex as is human ingenuity can devise."

Reader Jane Doe 3rd writes in to say that it's high time liquor was rationed. In addition to reducing drunkenness, she declares, such a step would free up "the tremendous amount of vital foods destroyed in order to manufacture liquor. If Americans heretofore labeled self-indulgent can learn restraint in eating, in driving, and even in footwear, surely we can learn restraint in drinking intoxicants."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (3).jpg

(Pretty poor image for this kind of youthful, wide-awake firm.)

A 47-year-old busboy at a Park Slope restaurant was ordered held without bail yesterday in Felony Court on felonious assault charges stemming with an argument with a co-worker over a ham. Vincent Carbella of 54 Fort Greene Place demanded that Elmer Ballance of Manhattan, employed as a cook in the establishment at 315 9th Street, serve him a portion of a ham being prepared in the kitchen. Ballance testified that when he refused to serve Carbella the ham, the busboy grabbed a carving knife and slashed him with it. Magistrate Thomas Cullen ordered Carbella held for the Grand Jury.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (4).jpg

("Dixie May Again Have To Battle Old Guy For Right Field Job." Uh, far be it from me to point out, Tommy, but aren't you and Grandpa Waner the same age? "NOT TRUE HE'S SEVEN MONTHS OLDER THAN ME THE OLD FOSSIL")

Comedian Red Skelton with his ex-wife gagwriter Edna Stillwell and his radio sidekicks Ozzie Nelson and Harriet Hilliard in tow, will be in town next week to begin filming his next movie, "Whistling in Brooklyn." The picture, the latest in the red-topped comic's MGM series dealing with a radio detective who stumbles onto murders, will include scenes to be shot next month at Ebbets Field. Nelson and his band will take advantage of the visit to do a week's run as the stage show at Loew's Capitol.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (5).jpg
("A wedding gown? Isn't it - um - kinda short? And what's with this pirate hat?")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (6).jpg

(Since the war, doesn't it seem like the quality of the phony counts you see around has really gone down?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (7).jpg
(OH THAT OLD GAG.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (8).jpg
(Beware of -- uh -- MEATWAGGERS!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (9).jpg
(Oh good, shady relatives.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_.jpg

"She haughtily threw the summons and the half buck to the sidewalk." Isn't it kinda hard to do that with a mink muff on?

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (1).jpg
I mean, after all, it *was* February.

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (2).jpg

Never play poker with a ten year old girl.

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (3).jpg

"Besides, she'll be going overseas in a month! You could end up a war widower!"

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (4).jpg
Yeah, you goldbrick! RICKENBACKER.

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (5).jpg

Wait'll he wins the Pulitzer Prize, then you'll be sorry.

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (6).jpg
"Him again?" "Him again."

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (7).jpg

And away we go...

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (8).jpg

"Are you *sure* you're all right sir?"

Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (9).jpg
Oh settle down, you know he's got no money in that account anyway.
 
Messages
17,009
Location
New York City
("A million poun'sa beef!" exults Joe. "Now we'eh gettin' somwheah." "Well, now, t'ink about t'is," warns Sally. "Fois'off, ya got how many people inna wholea N'Yawrk City -- ya got what, sev'n million? So ya gotta figyeh, t'at's one-sevn't a poun' a poisson. T'at comes t'what, one hamboigeh to a customeh. Annot a big one neiteh, prob'ly one a' t'em lit'l ones y'get at t' White Cas'l." "But wait now," protests Joe. "Not ev'ybody eats meat. Ya got ya people t'at eats ya wheat goim an' eggplants an' awlat -- ya vegetablaraians a'whateveh. An'en y'gotteh figgeh t'at a lotta people is real serious 'bout Lent. Y'gotta figgeh awlem people out of it. T'ey ain' gonna eat none'a t'at meat, annit's gonna leave moeh f't'rest've us." "OK," shrugs Sally. "F't'sake'a awrgyament -- make it a Bickf'ds hamboigeh stead'va White Cas'l. But y'still on'y get jus t'one." "Jus' one?" "Jus' one." "T'at ain' very much." "Hey," shrugs Sally. "Neveh look a gift hawrse inna mout'." "Oh, now," groans Joe. "You don't t'ink it's gonna be..." "Hawrsie!" laughs Leonora. "Giddyup!")
...

"...ya vegetablaraians..." :)


...

Russian troops have broken thru the primary German fortifications east of Smolensk, and are now reported to be storming the second defense line along an unnamed river west of the Upper Dnieper, reports from the front stated today. Attacking ceaselessly in the converging drive against the keystone base of the second front, the Soviets captured a dominant height beyond the Dnieper and blasted gaps in the German line. Field reports observed heavy fighting all along the new Nazi river line, which was described as heavily fortified and defended by powerful concentrations of artillery.
...

Hitler invading Russia is probably the greatest unforced error of all time.


...

In Tulsa, Oklahoma the society wife of a powerful oil millionaire was shot to death in a hotel room by another woman whom she had come to the hotel to meet. Mrs. T. K. Simmons, well known nationally as an exhibitor of fine horses, was shot following a struggle with 44-year-old Mrs. E. B. Howard of Fort Worth, Texas over the possession of a 25-caliber pistol, with which, Mrs. Howard told police, Mrs. Simmons had threatened her life. Police found the 55-year-old society matron dead on the floor of Room 926 of the hotel, shot three times by the pistol which they found on a dresser. Police say Mrs. Howard claimed that the gun was fired six times in total, the first two shots fired by Mrs. Simmons at her, and the other four were fired during the struggle over the gun. Mrs. Howard did not give police a reason why Mrs. Simmons would come to her hotel room to threaten her with a pistol, and other than her description of how the shots were fired, she had nothing further to say about the incident.
....

I bet we could take a stab a the reason and it starts with the numbers 44 and 55.


...

Shoppers should beware another meat-racket problem now encountered at some grocers -- the "tie in." It seems that some meat packers are requiring stores to buy quantities of their "by products" in order to also get much-needed meat, and these grocers are forcing these "tie in" items on their own customers in order to recover their loss. For example a packer may require a grocer to buy a quantity of their brand of dog biscuits in order to buy a quantity of hams -- and the grocer, in turn, might require the shopper to buy a box of dog biscuits -- whether or not they have a dog -- in order to get the ham. If the shopper refuses to buy the dog biscuits, the grocer might agree to let them have the meat, but only if they pay a "pro-rata" charge above and beyond the ceiling price of that meat. A racket like that might seem hard to beat -- but the shopper should always keep in mind that she can refuse to buy at all from that merchant.
...

price-ceiling.JPG


If graphs aren't your thing, all you need to know is this: a price ceiling causes shortages and everything else - queues, black markets, rationing, Sally and Joe's conversation this morning, etc. - follows perforce. (This message brought to you by those who argue Economic 101 does apply to real life.)


...

The Eagle Editorialist endorses the Ruml Pay-As-You-Go income tax plan, dismissing opposition claims that it is "immoral" as ridiculous. "Its very simplicity," he asserts, "is believed to annoy the hierarchy of tax experts who seem to like to make such matters as complex as is human ingenuity can devise."
...

4bj2.gif



...

A 47-year-old busboy at a Park Slope restaurant was ordered held without bail yesterday in Felony Court on felonious assault charges stemming with an argument with a co-worker over a ham. Vincent Carbella of 54 Fort Greene Place demanded that Elmer Ballance of Manhattan, employed as a cook in the establishment at 315 9th Street, serve him a portion of a ham being prepared in the kitchen. Ballance testified that when he refused to serve Carbella the ham, the busboy grabbed a carving knife and slashed him with it. Magistrate Thomas Cullen ordered Carbella held for the Grand Jury.
...

For explanation, see graph above.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (8).jpg

(Beware of -- uh -- MEATWAGGERS!)
...

For explanation, see graph above.


And in the Daily News...
Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_.jpg



"She haughtily threw the summons and the half buck to the sidewalk." Isn't it kinda hard to do that with a mink muff on?
...

Mrs. Griffith is a not-smart gold-digger; I'm going to bet she did not do well in life when her looks went.

It sounds like he had a rich mother, which might explain where the Reverend's money came from, but again, what sane person carries the 2023 equivalent of nearly $1 million on his person?


...
Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (3).jpg


"Besides, she'll be going overseas in a month! You could end up a war widower!"
...

One difference, though, the "love child" will travel with her until the WAACs find out, then she and the baby will be back on Junior and Mom's doorstep. Won't that be fun.


...
Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (4).jpg

Yeah, you goldbrick! RICKENBACKER.
...

Can't you picture Gould throwing another log on the fire, taking a sip of his coffee and casually buttoning up his cardigan as he writes this?


...
Daily_News_Fri__Mar_26__1943_ (5).jpg


Wait'll he wins the Pulitzer Prize, then you'll be sorry.
...

Every war needs its T. E. Lawrences.
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One Too Many
Messages
1,723
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
Wasn't an American correspondent and his driver and cameraman caught in the desert by Iraqis Desert Storm?
CBS I believe. And there was a kid smart ass who'd mouthed off to an American brigadier at a press briefing the week before. All about getting the story. And the brigadier warned the desert was dangerous. ohh. Bob Simon now I remember, and that presser with the kid reporter was the following week or so. Because I now remember that capture was cited and blamed on the American military control of all press desert coverage. And that kid was the girls termed 'Desert Fox' and the 'Scud Stud.' He was an ABC correspondent. Younger, not Peter Jennings. Just remembered this from Fast's TE Lawrence comment. Funny how this just jogged my memory.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_.jpg

("See?" notes Sally. "Like I tol' ya yestehday. A million poun'sa meat ain' nut'n, really, not aroun'is town." "Split a hamboigeh wit'cha," grumbles Joe. "No sense bein' greedy." "T'at Princess seems like a nice kid," observes Sally, changing the subject. "Won'eh if she c'n do t' Big Apple," wonders Joe. "Aw, kids t'day don' do t' Big Apple," reflects Sally. "T'ats owr time, not t'eahs." I s'pose," sighs Joe. "Hey, y'boit'day's comin' up'n a coupla weeks. Whatcha say we take a Sun'ay night an' go out steppin'? Show t'ese squoits what t'ol' folks c'n do." "Aw," protests Sally, "I dunno. What about Leonoreh?" "Ya ma ain' got nut'n goin' on Sun'ay nights. She c'n take 'eh." "Well.." "G'wan, I'll give ya my half'a t'hamboigeh." "Well, if y'put it t'at way...")

British Foreign Minister Anthony Eden, indicating an American-British agreement on postwar plans, appeared today to be trying to dispel Chinese doubts that Britain considers the Pacific war important. Following an address by Eden to the Maryland Legislature at Annapolis last night, the Foriegn Minister made several pledges intended to ease Chinese fears raised by Prime Minister Winston Churchill's failure to mention China at all in his speech to the British public last Sunday. Mr. Eden stressed that "China no longer stands alone," and pledged that the Burma Road will be open again, and that Britain stands with China in its efforts to "cut back the evil growth in the Pacific" represented by Japan. The Foreign Minister further stressed that China will have a full share, alongside Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union, in the discussion of any postwar international authority.

International financier J. P. Morgan left the bulk of his vast estate to his two sons, now serving as officers in the Navy, but his will, probated yesterday in Mineola, Long Island, also contains many smaller bequests to his employees, ranging from $50,000 to his personal secretary John Axten and his personal gardener James Kelly, to a bonus payment of six months' wages to every employee of J. P. Morgan & Sons who has worked for the firm for at least five years, and three months' wages to all other current employees. Another $50,000 bequest will go to the Protestant Episcopal Church Diocese of Long Island.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(1).jpg

("Mugging" over the last year or so has developed into a term with specific racial connotations, and Judge Brancato here is calling that out from the bench. It will be interesting to see if the Eagle takes his hint.)

Madame Chiang Kai-Shek was feted in San Francisco last night with one of the most lavish banquets in the city's history, as more than 2100 persons, paying as much as $200 a plate, crowded into three banquet rooms at the hotel where she is staying. Mayor Angelo Rossi presented Madame Chiang with a 32-carat Oriental amethyst of royal purple color, inset with diamonds and rubies. "I am touched," declared the wife of China's Generalissimo. Madame Chiang will deliver an address to the American people over the radio tonight, during which she is expected to amplify remarks she made at a press conference before the dinner. Her eyes snapping, Madame Chaing told reporters "I am not here to beg. China is not begging for anything. We want from you what you want from us -- perfect understanding and goodwill, and to help us in whatever way you can, just as we would help you in the same way under the same circumstances." Madame Chiang's broadcast from San Francisco will be heard tonight at 12 midnight over WEAF.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(2).jpg

("Schroth!" Butch bellows into the telephone. "What's the big idea of putting that punk cartoon of me in your yellow sheet! You know very well I never sit down!")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(3).jpg

(Curse of the firstborn.)

The 47-year-old pickpocket who argued that his profession was not merely a trade but "an art" will serve four to five years in Sing Sing to contemplate its meaning. Judge Joseph M. Conroy in Long Island City Court today sentenced William Brown following the suspect's conviction on attempted second-degree grand larceny charges stemming from the lifting of a wallet containing $109 from a passenger on a Jamaica bus. It was Brown's 35th conviction on pocket-picking charges.

Three Brooklyn men face Federal charges for counterfeiting gasoline ration coupons, in what is described as the first such case of its type in the borough. 42 year old Albert Sherman, a restaurant counterman, 27 year old Louis Menendez, a mechanic, and 34-year-old Michael Sweetlovitz, a carpenter, were charged by a special FBI agent with counterfeiting between 50,000 and 60,000 gallons worth of "T" ration coupons, which they then conspired to distribute. Menendez and Sweetlovitz pleaded guilty to the charges, and are being held in lieu of $500 bail pending action, while Sherman pleaded not guilty, and is being held on $500 bail as he awaits Federal Grand Jury action.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(4).jpg

("AWRIGHT PRETTY BOY! LET'S SEE YA SQUARE DANCE NOW!" -- Leo, who I'll confidently wager ordered Chipman to thunk Dixie.)

Olsen and Johnson will close this weekend at the Winter Garden, and will shift "Sons O' Fun" to the 46th Street Theatre beginning Monday. The boys have cavorted at the Winter Garden in their present show for over a year, and spent three years there in "Hellzapoppin" before shifting that show to the Majestic for the closing weeks of its run.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(5).jpg

("Idiotic? I'll have you know it was $2.98 at Namm's")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(6).jpg

(The PHANTOM of DISGUISE!)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(7).jpg

("Cypress? Yeah, I guess so. But I was thinking more of the alligators.")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(8).jpg

("LOOK YOU DIDN'T HIRE ME TO JACK MEAT! YOU WANT MEATJACKING THAT'S TEN DOLLARS EXTRA PLUS A PERCENTAGE OF THE TAKE! I'M SORRY YOU DON'T LIKE IT, THAT'S HOW I WORK!")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(9).jpg

(LEONA? Is that YOU? "Ehhh, it's a living.")
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_.jpg

"No, you can't bring the car. No, you can't put the flashing MAYOR sign on a jeep."

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(1).jpg

"And then THIS had to happen." Life's tough, toots.

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(2).jpg

Kids, don't try this at home.

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(4).jpg

"And then round the kids up so I can issue weapons!"

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(5).jpg

"Dear," yells Mr. Gould into the next room. "Do we have any more of that spiced rum?"

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(6).jpg

"That's French for 'what's it worth to ya?'"

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(7).jpg

Oh, Min. Thirty years of marriage and you still have to ask?

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(8).jpg

"And you better LIKE potatoes, because that's all you're gonna get!"

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(9).jpg

"And it's STILL a great idea! Wonder what I could get for a pink mouse?"

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(10).jpg

Shadow Smart -- SECRET AGENT!
 
Messages
17,009
Location
New York City
...

Three Brooklyn men face Federal charges for counterfeiting gasoline ration coupons, in what is described as the first such case of its type in the borough. 42 year old Albert Sherman, a restaurant counterman, 27 year old Louis Menendez, a mechanic, and 34-year-old Michael Sweetlovitz, a carpenter, were charged by a special FBI agent with counterfeiting between 50,000 and 60,000 gallons worth of "T" ration coupons, which they then conspired to distribute. Menendez and Sweetlovitz pleaded guilty to the charges, and are being held in lieu of $500 bail pending action, while Sherman pleaded not guilty, and is being held on $500 bail as he awaits Federal Grand Jury action.
...

"Sally, I wonder if they'll be making counterfeit meat ration tickets?"
"Of course they will, you know these crooks never miss an opportunity."
"Hmm, we should talk with your mother."
"What?"
"Nut'n."


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(5).jpg


("Idiotic? I'll have you know it was $2.98 at Namm's")
...

The idiot hat comment was perfect.

I thought you had to be tall to be a model back then and her nickname is shorty, and not ironically.


And in the Daily News...
Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_.jpg


"No, you can't bring the car. No, you can't put the flashing MAYOR sign on a jeep."
...

"Well then, I say it's spinach, and I say the hell with it!" - MAYOR LaGuardia


...
Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(2).jpg


Kids, don't try this at home.
...

She's not going down without a fight. You have to say that for her.


...
Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(7).jpg


Oh, Min. Thirty years of marriage and you still have to ask?
...

Even more surprising, thirty years of marriage and she still has some embarrassment left in her. How?


Oh, and...

Daily_News_Sat__Mar_27__1943_(3).jpg

PROFILING. "Besides, we had to stand outside. There was a line."

One, my God, good policing in 1943 demands constant surveillance on every single candy store in the city and, two, I got even money that "Steaming Sailor" is really a certain grandmother who lives above a certain candy store.


N.B. Kudos on the "spiced rum" comment, LOL.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,328
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Mar_28__1943_.jpg

("Ev'y time I seen one'a t'ese wawr stories sayin' 'Boro man t'is 'a 't'at," sighs Joe, "I wondeh why we ain' hoid f'm Solly f'so lawng. I wish t'eah was some way t'fin' out." "Ain' he got relatives?" suggests Sally, as she chops a tomato. "His ma pass't a lawng time ago," shrugs Joe. "His pa useta run a butcheh shop oveh t'Williamsboig, oveh t'eah on Lenn'id Street, neah wheah me an' my sisteh useta live, but he pass't too, a few yeehs ago. Solly tol' me oncet t'at he's got aunts 'n uncles 'n cousins still oveh in...oveh t'eah, you know? He wrote a letteh to 'em when his pa pass't, but he tol' me it come back 'address unknown.' I guess t'at was why he was so hep t'jern up an' fight, y'know?" Sally's hand tightens around the knife grip until the tendons show. "I guess we'eh 'bout t'on'y fam'ly Solly's got," Joe continues. "I hope he's awright." "I do too," replies Sally. There is no other sound but the quiet chopping of the tomato.)

British and Canadian bombers, making their first major night attack against Germany in nearly two weeks, blasted Duisberg, Europe's largest inland port, on Friday night, and raided other targets in the rich industrial sector of the Ruhr. A strong force of the big four engined bombers flew thru thick clouds and a very heavy barrage to batter Duisberg, a strategic center of Germany's heavy war industries. Four bombers, including two from the RCAF, were lost, it was confirmed by the Air Ministry today.

Swedish reports stated last night that more than 500 British secret agents and a similar number of Norwegian soldiers, officers, and men were dropped by parachute over the winter onto Norwegian soil, where they are now in hiding, waiting for orders to strike. The Stockholm newspaper Social Demokraten said that German spies had learned of "widespread military organizations" formed by these secret agents. "There is now an army of ghosts," stated the article, "that may one day spring into action in Norway." Recent reports from Sweden also told of planes landing in Norway, followed by many acts of sabotage against the Germans. It was reported that more than 8000 revolvers, 12,030 rifles, and 320 machine guns have "mysteriously vanished from German arsenals." The report also noted that tensions in Norway are rising, and the followers of Maj. Vidkun Quisling are "becoming alarmed."

American bombers for the first time rained heavy destruction on the Japanese base at Nauru Island, which guards one of the approaches to Truk, "the Gibraltar of the South Pacific." The attack was made by four-engined Liberator bombers on Friday after a long flight from an undisclosed American base.

In the State Capitol, a legislator is warning that, unless something is done quickly to curb illicit trafficking in meats and other foodstuffs, rioting may follow. Assemblyman John H. Devany (D-New York) argued that "unless immediate steps are taken by our Federal enforcement agencies, the situation, in my opinion, will become exceedingly grave, with the possibility of riots." Devany was the sponsor of a resolution which sought to establish an investigatory body to open an inquiry into the black market situation in order to avert "a grievous hardship on low income families due to black market operations." That resolution, however, was not reported out, despite appeals by Devany to several legislators, and no action was taken on the proposal before the session adjourned. Action was taken, however, on a plan to authorize a study of the rationing system in the state by the Committee on Nutrition, headed by Sen. Thomas C. Desmond, who declared that the panel's first assignment will be to combat the black market meat situation.

A 20-year-old Williamsburg man pleaded not guilty in Felony Court yesterday to charges of burglary, possession of burglar's tools, and petty larceny stemming from a robbery of a small grocery store at 25 Broadway. Store owner William Frieberg charged that Philip Niewradowski of 279 Wythe Avenue stole $15 worth of goods, consisting of ten pounds of coffee, three pounds of butter, and ten pounds of cheese. Magistrate Thomas Cullen ordered Niewadrowski held on $1500 aggregate bail for a hearing next Tuesday.

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("Well!")

Reader I. Aidenstein writes in to say that he attended the "We Will Never Die" presentation recently at Madison Square Garden, and came away from the evening wondering why "a people who have given so much to humanity should in turn become the victims of every sort of ill treatment? What sort of world do we live in? What do the words civilization and democracy mean? What sort of civilization can it be called when man against man and people against people act so brutally?" He acknowledges "many fine words" have been spoken by "good will organizations of Christians and Jews," but "words, no matter how fine and sincere, are merely words. What is most needed is action that will speak louder than words." He adds, "may the significance and spirit of Purim, of the downfall of Haman, the Hitler of those days, help us all."

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("Large Louie Newsom?" "HAHAHAHA!" laughs Fitz. "That's funny!")

Tommy Holmes relates a story passed on to him by "some of the boys" at Bear Mountain. It seems that one day in the midst of last summer's tight pennant race. Pete Reiser was standing in center field, in geographic proximity to the First Lady of the Bleachers, Hilda Chester, when Hilda tossed a note down from her seat in the upper deck, and commanded Pete to pass it along to Leo in the dugout. When, at the end of the inning, Pete did so, the Lip responded with a roar. "What the 'ell is this!" the Dodger skipper bellowed. "You play center field and worry about your hitting! I'll handle the pitchers!" Flabbergasted, Pete took a look at the note. "Casey looks tired," it read. "You better get somebody warmed up!"

Enos Slaughter, whose long drive at Sportsman's Park last summer sent Pete Reiser crashing into the concrete wall, is now an aviation cadet in the Army Air Force. Enos, whom they call "Country," because he is exactly that, says he tries to keep to himself and avoids officers because, as he says "I don't know much 'bout this salutin' business."

Old Timer John F. Pfalzgraff says "there were no angels in the old Tenth Ward, and the way of the transgressors was a hard one." While most of those he knew in the old days were good honest folk, some were not -- maybe not "bad," exactly, but "not overly good and meriting the acclaim of the neighbors."

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("Waspish, short, thin, but wiry.")

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("But I'm just a poor ol' lady." Never works for me either.)

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(Really? Monty must have a new press agent.)

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("Reality Radio" was a real fad of the time, with the unqualified heaping shoddy advice on the credulous.)

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(Rampaging self-diagnosis was a thing, too.)

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("We call this hairstyle 'the Raven.' Don't ask me why." And meanwhile, BRING ON THE ALLIGATORS.)

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(What, no interesting facts about Monty? That press agent isn't so hot after all.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
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And in the Daily News...

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Yeah, he'll live.

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Leonora crumples up this page and throws it across the room for Stella to fetch.

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Somehow I've never imagined Tracy to be a main of faith.

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"Of course. Here, let me call Andy. I gave it to him for safe keeping."

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Point of order: ever seen a rhino up close? Their heads are much bigger than this, unless it's a baby rhino, in which case how awful a human being do you have to be to hang a baby rhino's head over your fireplace, in which case you deserve to have Willie sleeping on your couch.

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That was easy.

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Settle down, Walt. Nobody likes a NIMBY.

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Honey really wishes she'd gone ahead and joined the WAACs.

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Gonna crash right into Mosely's house, too. SERVES YA RIGHT.

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Malcolm Mitt, Father of Kickboxing.
 

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