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The Yoga Pants trend

sheeplady

I'll Lock Up
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Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, USA
lol Oh no worries, this deal is just between me and Undertow. I'm not paying for the whole lounge to do it :eeek:

Well, darn it. And I just registered for a ballroom dance class! I was counting on that $25!

On a separate note, I've decided that I am just not observant enough. I've been trying to spot yoga pant wearers for the past several days, and haven't had much luck. :( I have seen sweatpants and shorts though.
 
'chipper' ? i think you'll find it's 'chippie' as in "am gannin up the chippie"

Yes, I grew up with "Chippie". I converted to Chipper later on (see below).

What region of Scotland does "Chipper" come from - is it an East side thing? In the Six Counties, and my experience of the West coast, it's more Chippy, though funnily enough "chipper" is the common term in Dublin...

"Chipper" is chiefly found North of Montrose, but may also be used as far south as Forfar and Arbroath. The real heartland, though is the "heroin run" - Aberdeen-Peterhead-Fraserburgh - where it's pronunciation is Chi'er. Say it as though the to P's were T's and glottal stop on the T's. As John Shuttleworth would say, "It's nice up north".

[edit]I love it that we're (mostly) capitalising "Chipper/ie". What does that say about us that we consider the Chipper so important as to deserve capitalisation? Moreover, what does it say about the heretic HBK that he doesn't capitalise?
 
Last edited:

Edward

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London, UK
Yes, I grew up with "Chippie". I converted to Chipper later on (see below).



"Chipper" is chiefly found North of Montrose, but may also be used as far south as Forfar and Arbroath. The real heartland, though is the "heroin run" - Aberdeen-Peterhead-Fraserburgh - where it's pronunciation is Chi'er. Say it as though the to P's were T's and glottal stop on the T's. As John Shuttleworth would say, "It's nice up north".

[edit]I love it that we're (mostly) capitalising "Chipper/ie". What does that say about us that we consider the Chipper so important as to deserve capitalisation? Moreover, what does it say about the heretic HBK that he doesn't capitalise?

I don't care what they call it as long as they do a decent haggis supper....
 

Tango Yankee

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Lucasville, OH
I've been working my way through this thread and a few things came to mind.

First, any time someone starts a thread about a particular bit of clothing being worn in an inappropriate setting the discussion quickly settles into a couple of well-worn ruts. You have those on the side of "anything you want to wear any time/any place is OK" and "What someone wears doesn't say a thing about that person" versus "Certain forms of dress are appropriate in certain venues and inappropriate in others" and "Yes, what you are wearing DOES tell the world something about you." I tend to fall into the latter group.

Second, at most of the campuses I support they have a question on the mirrors in the restrooms. It says "Would YOU hire this person?" In my opinion the main problem with this is that the people at whom it is directed for the most part either take on the belligerent position that it shouldn't matter what they wear or look like, what should matter is how good you are or they simply do not know any better because they've never been taught any different. Reality check time: First impressions matter. Period. If your first impression is in a job interview and the interviewer has a negative reaction to your appearance, you're likely not going to get the chance to prove you're a diamond in the rough.

Third, on another web site (one that has nothing to do with dress and appearances) a regular poster stated that when he retired he got rid of all of his suits, sport coats, ties, etcetera and only dresses casually. When he gets an invitation to a dinner party or other function where the dress is specified to be more formal than he likes (suit or sport coat and tie, etcetera) he tells the person inviting him that if they want his company there they will make an exception for him.

Personally, I think that is one of the most selfish things I've heard when it comes to dressing appropriately. This person is telling his host/hostest that he has no respect at all for their wishes and, in turn, for them. If I was the host and someone said that to me I'd tell them that I was sorry they decided not to attend... and then not invite them again.

Fourth, on the yoga pants, my 11-year-old granddaughter has a pair of tights that I now suppose must be "yoga pants" even though she does no yoga. She is not allowed out of the house in them unless she is wearing a skirt or a top long enough to cover her rear completely. Both she and her 7 year-old sister know that if Papa thinks it's inappropriate, it's not being worn to school. What gets me about the brouhaha on this subject (the particular school which is enforcing their dress code) is that the parents seem to be completely missing from the discussion. The kids are interviewed, the school is quoted, but where are the parents? Why are they allowing their kids to wear the yoga pants when it's against school policy?

Fifth, regarding the tendency for those who are/were required to wear a uniform in their careers to then want to dress down when they've left it, I had the opposite feeling. After decades of having to wear the BDU or the DCU as the uniform of the day despite working in an office job where blues would have been more appropriate (We're Warfighters, doncha know) I was looking forward to landing a job where I would be able to dress nicely, at the very least business casual (sportcoat/tie dress slacks/shoes). Unfortunately, I haven't been able to land such a job. Instead of being IT management (where my education and experience would have me) I'm an IT field technician (and lucky to have that, living as I am in an area that has very little use for professional IT to begin with.) I started out trying to wear business casual, but eventually switched to the more appropriate-to-the-job jeans and a long-sleeve button-down shirt, often with the school's name on it. Business casual just didn't go well with a job that often has me lying on the floor under a desk. Again, the whole issue of "appropriateness" is the factor here. I may not be able to wear business casual, but at least I can maintain a bit of professionalism in my choice of clothing and how I wear it.

Sixth, when my wife and I got married we were both wearing boots, jeans and matching chambray shirts with a blue 2003 BMW K1200GT embroidered on the chest. This was appropriate because we were married during Bike Week in Daytona Beach at the county courthouse by the county clerk. Later, when we had a "church" wedding in front of family and friends it was in conjunction with my retirement ceremony, so I was wearing dress blues and she was wearing a very nice dress bought for the dual occassion. Again, we wore what was appropriate for the situation.

I guess that's enough for now. We have fun going 'round and 'round with this subject from time to time, but I've noticed that no one has ever changed their position after the dust clears! :D

Cheers,
Tom
 
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13,419
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Orange County, CA
at most of the campuses I support they have a question on the mirrors in the restrooms. It says "Would YOU hire this person?" In my opinion the main problem with this is that the people at whom it is directed for the most part either take on the belligerent position that it shouldn't matter what they wear or look like, what should matter is how good you are or they simply do not know any better because they've never been taught any different. Reality check time: First impressions matter. Period. If your first impression is in a job interview and the interviewer has a negative reaction to your appearance, you're likely not going to get the chance to prove you're a diamond in the rough.

To paraphrase what one of the posters said, there are too many people out there who are so clueless that would look at that sign while dressed in their torn jeans and hoodie and say, "Hell yeah, dude!" :doh:
 

Tango Yankee

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About 10 years ago my wife worked at a state university in the Financial Aid office. She told me once that she stopped and apologized to a student she was assisting. His face had so many piercings that she was having a very difficult time focusing on anything else as it was so distracting to her. I can only wonder how hiring officers must have felt when interviewing him after he graduated.

Yes, getting tattoos and piercings may be commonplace these days, but until the tattooed and pierced have worked their way up the ranks and are the ones doing the hiring more often than not the adornments will work against them.

I grew a beard after I retired from the USAF. Kept it during my short stint as a truck driver, but when I was looking to get back into IT an interview coach had this to say about it: he asked me if I thought of the beard as a part of who I was, central to my identity. If it was, I should keep it but be aware it may work against me when interviewing. I opted to shave it off as it wasn't a necessary part of my identity. Whether the lack of a beard helped me get my current job or not I cannot say, but I do know that no one else in our IT department has a beard nor can I think of anyone on the corporate staff who does.

Cheers,
Tom
 

scottyrocks

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9,169
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Isle of Langerhan, NY
I had facial hair in one form or another for 25 years. I had thought it was part of my identity. But when I shaved it all off I realized that it was not. Where my head is and was at, at any given time, had everything to do with my outlook on life, including what I thought looked good on me, and as an integral part of me.

When I had interviewed for a teaching job in 1992 I had long hair, facial hair, and earrings. I got the job. Even though I may have looked like a rebel, I have never acted like one. I'm still in the same school, except now with no hair, and no facial hair. I still have the earrings. :)
 

Pompidou

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Plainfield, CT
To me, facial hair is the other extreme of this argument. It's pretty easy to argue the right to draw conclusions when the outfits in question are so controversial. On the other hand, do people by and large agree with people who won't hire anyone with a well maintained beard? Assume it's clean and well maintained for the sake of argument. I think the slippery slope runs both ways, and "even a well maintained goatee will be abhorrent if we let a shadowy cabal of elitists dictate a world dress code" is on one end and, "so we should let everyone run around unshowered, ungroomed and naked if they feel like it?" is on the other.

Why do I not draw conclusions based on dress? Because I used to, and I was wrong enough times, and a few important times. I judged. My third cafe partner was a victim. I thought he was a thug when I first saw him. Sometimes evil wears suits, and sometimes good people dress dangerously. The cafe team is certainly turning into a "Dirty Dozen" of unlikely partners, and I kind of like it that way.
 

sheeplady

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Second, at most of the campuses I support they have a question on the mirrors in the restrooms. It says "Would YOU hire this person?" In my opinion the main problem with this is that the people at whom it is directed for the most part either take on the belligerent position that it shouldn't matter what they wear or look like, what should matter is how good you are or they simply do not know any better because they've never been taught any different.

In my school, the students would have stolen the mirrors. Our bathrooms never had mirrors. Or doors. (Although the school took off the doors.)
 

MisterCairo

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7,005
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Gads Hill, Ontario
Fourth, on the yoga pants, my 11-year-old granddaughter has a pair of tights that I now suppose must be "yoga pants" even though she does no yoga. She is not allowed out of the house in them unless she is wearing a skirt or a top long enough to cover her rear completely. Both she and her 7 year-old sister know that if Papa thinks it's inappropriate, it's not being worn to school. What gets me about the brouhaha on this subject (the particular school which is enforcing their dress code) is that the parents seem to be completely missing from the discussion. The kids are interviewed, the school is quoted, but where are the parents? Why are they allowing their kids to wear the yoga pants when it's against school policy?


Cheers,
Tom

EXACTLY! My wife teaches high school and I park my car right beside it. I see the kids coming and going, all sorts of attire, most of it non-descript. What stands out are the gangsta-pantswaist down at the knees jacka&^%s and the girls in the airbrushed on "yoga" pants.

The punks in the red mohawks don't stand out (35 year old fashions rarely do), nor the skids in jeans head to toe. In each and every case, one or occasionally even today two parents watch each and every one of them leave the house.

In certain cases, I just shake my head in wonder.

In a non-judgmental fashion, of course. We can't have the use of judgment now, can we?
 

Pompidou

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Plainfield, CT
Using judgement is great, but is looking down on people really a right you want people to see you fighting so hard for? That's how it sometimes comes across - not directed at anyone in particular. Sometimes it seems like people relish their sense of self superiority over the common rabble and it can rub people the wrong way.
 

reetpleat

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Seattle
It seems to me, a lot of people want to judge and speak negatively of people who wear certain things, then defend it by acting as if that person came to them complaining about not getting a job.

None of these people asked you for a job, for your advice on how to dress for an interview, or attended your wedding. They are students. If you can't roll out of bed after a night of binge drinking or pot smoking, and throw on your sweats or yoga pants and flip flops, or just stay in your pajamas and go to class when you are in college, when can ya? Trust me, no one is more aware of what is appropriate and fits in with what everyone else is wearing than a high school or college student.
 

reetpleat

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Seattle
I don't hav any kids, and was being a bit facetious. Obviously, no one wants their kid binge drinking or pot smoking. But how they dress doesn't likely make much difference to their grades.
 

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