What Are You Reading

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by Lancealot, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    London, UK
    Another Goodis fan!!!!! We seem to share similar tastes.
     
  2. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    After I quit Confederacy I came across Ignatius Rising by Rene Pol Nevils and Deborah George Hardy.
    A satisfactory read as far as Toole's background but its scholarship has been questioned; also, his suicide remains clouded.
    _________________

    Elliot Carlson, Joe Rochefort's War; The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway.

    The trials and tribulations of a Navy mustang.
     
  3. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Yep, that one is extremely controversial and divisive among Tooleophiles -- the definitive Toole bio has yet to be written, and probably never will be.

    For another approach, try "Ken and Thelma," by Joel Fletcher, a book which emphasizes the role Toole's mother had in the author's life and in the publication of "Confederacy." Thelma was enough of a character in her own right to have fit right into Ignatius's world -- she wasn't quite the Irene Reilly of the novel, but you could see where Irene came from.
     
  4. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    11,937
    Location:
    Northern California
    That is the beauty of The Fedora Lounge. Bruno Fischer and Dan Marlowe are two other authors who are under appreciated; although Goodis is less so. Fortunately, not just Vintage Crime/Black Lizard and Hard Case are re-releasing these and other authors, but now we have Prologue to be thankful for as well.
    :D
     
  5. 1mach1

    1mach1

    Messages:
    15,256
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    Naked Lunch by Wm. S. Burroughs
     
  6. dh66

    dh66

    Messages:
    12,505
    Location:
    down south
    An interesting essay, to say the least. It's a favorite of mine. Definitely not the first place most folks minds go when they think about the fabulous 50s.
     
  7. 1mach1

    1mach1

    Messages:
    15,256
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    That's an understatement! :p
     
  8. Heather

    Heather Practically Family

    Messages:
    657
    Location:
    Southern Maine, USA
    I'm currently reading "Harpo speaks!" An interesting life and a wonderful story teller :)
     
  9. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    "And I was There," Pearl Harbor and Midway-Breaking The Secrets, Rear Admiral Edwin T. Layton, USN
    with Capt. Roger Pineau, USNR, and John Costello
     
  10. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    London, UK
    'The Brothers Rico' by Georges Simenon.
     
  11. DNO

    DNO One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,815
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Goodbye to All That by Robert Graves.
     
  12. TimeWarpWife

    TimeWarpWife One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    In My House
    Inspired by actor David Suchet's special on PBS, Being Poirot, I am reading the first of the Hercule Poirot books, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. Only 38 more to go, or 42 if I also read the collection of short stories.
     
  13. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    13,632
    Location:
    New York City
    And what do you think of it so far?
     
  14. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Pearl Harbor Final Judgement, Henry C. Clausen

    Lt Col Clausen, a San Francisco attorney served as special investigator (1944-45) for Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of War,
    and his memoir recounts his investigation of the events surrounding Pearl Harbor.

    And military justice is to Justice what military music is to music-:)
     
  15. You need to read Rear Admiral Layton's book And I Was There.
    Stimson was NOT an impartial investigator.
     
  16. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US

    I have read Layton's And I Was There, an excellent book. :)

    ....and did I write that Stimson was objective? ;)
     

  17. No, but knowing what we know now, Kimmel and Short were set up as scapegoats and were railroaded by Washington and Stimson in particular.:doh:
    It never made sense to me how they were raked over the coals while MacArthur walked away a hero for doing essentially the same thing but with much better access to intelligence that he was going to be attacked. :doh:Crazy!
     
  18. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US


    But cruel are the times when we are traitors
    And do not know ourselves; when we hold rumor
    From what we fear, yet know not what we fear,
    But float upon a wild and violent sea.

    Macbeth IV; II
     
  19. Yes, poor Banquo Kimmel and Short. :p
     
  20. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,684
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    The Hawaiian commanders were unjustly treated and endured scorn for the remainder of their lives.
    Others, such as Joseph Rochefort, despite his phenomenal contribution during Midway, remained haunted by Pearl Harbor.
    Edwin Layton, one suspects, carried a similar quiet guilt. And there is the thunder of silence. George Marshall (as Short himself predicted)
    never penned his Second World War memoirs, and much of the official record-American and British-noted by Layton remains sealed.
    And still, an advocatus diabolli scribbled by Stimson's bag boy Clausen finds the light.

    And History herself remains taciturn and jealously guards her secrets.
     

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