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What Are You Reading

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by Lancealot, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,021
    Location:
    New York City
    Lizzie, I'm going to have to check one of those out.

    Edit add: just checked, they ain't cheap.
     
  2. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Yeah, I paid about twenty for mine, and it was a deal. It's going to take a while to get the rest of them but time I've got.
     
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,021
    Location:
    New York City
    I've been reading "The Stories of John Cheever" a collection of his short stories from '30s - '60s. I've probably read about ten so far and, while most are pretty straightforward - think Fitzgerald-like but focused more on lower, middle or upper-middle class (mainly) New Yorkers than Fitzgerald's canvas of the super rich - a few, surprisingly to me, slip into Rod Serling "The Twilight Zone" world.

    One that could have been a perfect thirty minute "The Twilight Zone" episode had a New York City apartment-dwelling couple buy a fancy new radio that the stay-at-home wife discovers receives "broadcasts" from their neighbors' apartments. As you can imagine, this quickly impacts her view of her neighbors, then, herself and, then, her own relationship. Throw in a surprise ending and "The Twilight Zone" script is all but written.

    I had only read a few of his stories many years ago, which had left the impression that he was a sort of Fitzgerald for the normal people of the world, so his occasional trip (it's happened in two stories so far) into "The Twilight Zone" surprised me. I doubt I'll read all (guessing) seventy or so stories before I pick up something else, but I will read more now and all of them eventually. I find short stories the perfect solution to the "I don't know what I want to read next and am not willing to commit to something yet" conundrum.
     
  4. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,698
    Location:
    Midwest America

    I've always believed that, for me anyway, MAD was one of the more educational publications ever. Topical and historical references always had me running for a dictionary or encyclopedia, and I became a daily newspaper reader at ten. I had to stay up on world events just to appreciate MAD's satire.
     
  5. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,295
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Pegasus runs tomorrow. A stack of data to sift through tonite.
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,021
    Location:
    New York City
    Whom do you like?
     
  7. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,295
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    City of Light-a prior score over Accelerate whom had lost a step since; Seeking the Soul looked good.
    The Pegasus is a favorite race now, GP's track configuration aside; however, I was tied down Saturday
    and missed the track entirely. Since the season is now starting, and the Pegasus handle is tapped to compensate
    collective ownership entry fees, its diminished take is somewhat less a draw. Still, I grimace having the batting
    line on a chaotic day and the resultant busted flush hurts like hell.
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  8. Klunk

    Klunk New in Town

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Reno Nevada
    Just finished Dark Invasions by Howard Blum. The book is set in NYC in 1915. NYPD Captian Tunney is in charge of solving bombings to supply ships headed to England to support WWI. It follows a maze of German spies who conduct germ warfare, bombings, and the attempted assasination of J.P. Morgan Jr.

    This non fiction book was hard to put down. I recommend this book to any history buff looking for a fast read.
     
  9. martinsantos

    martinsantos Practically Family

    Messages:
    571
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    After a long time I'm back.

    Finished Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. Interesting, sometimes brilliant. In 1961 for sure it was fat in the fire showing everyone in war as crazy/stupid. Today I can't say so.
     
    Touchofevil likes this.
  10. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,295
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Welcome back Martin. How is the Law ?



    .
     
  11. martinsantos

    martinsantos Practically Family

    Messages:
    571
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    Thanks, Harp!

    Going strong - ever with a persistent insight that this world (specially at courts) are getting mad. But that's our world, so let's go ahead.

     
  12. JeanLo

    JeanLo New in Town

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Santa Barbara
    Jurassic Park, again. Thinking about listening to one of the Lincoln Lawyers...
     
  13. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,295
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Pulled Hamlet out this morning on the train. Shakespeare's inverted 16th C English replete with
    metaphorical license, puns, and diverse spectre serve literary caffeine to commuting.
     
  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,021
    Location:
    New York City
    About half way through the 600+ pages of "The Stories of John Cheever" and, while I'm enjoying them, I'm going to take a break, as they are all blending together in my head. They were not written and published to be read one after another, so it probably make sense to step away. I'll be back though as they are the perfect answer to the "I don't know that I want to read next and am not ready to make a big commitment" conundrum.
     
  15. martinsantos

    martinsantos Practically Family

    Messages:
    571
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    Tartarin of Tarascon, by Alphonse Daudet.

    At least here these novels are long forgotten, but around 1900 they were a big hit! Daudet is probably the only naturalism author with sense of humor.
     
  16. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Didn't know what I wanted to read before bed last night so I did what I usually do -- took my glasses off and pulled a random book off the shelf. Turned out to be Wodehouse's "Brinkley Court," the Little,Brown 1934 edition of "Right Ho, Jeeves." If you're going to read a book chosen at random you could do a lot worse than select this one, the definitive tale of fish-faced newt-fancying orange-juice addict Gussie Fink-Nottle and his romance with the "weird what-you-may-call-it" Madeline Bassett. Spink-Bottle's speech before the assembled scholars of Market Snodsbury Grammar School remains a high point of English comic fiction.
     
  17. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,035
    Location:
    Gadshill, Ontario
    Away on temporary duty last week, I finished off Ian Rankin's latest Rebus mystery, In a House of Lies, as well as the latest Uhtred of Bebanburg novel from Bernard Cornwell, War of the Wolf.
     
  18. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer A-List Customer

    Messages:
    428
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Had never read it before.
    And, in audio format, Fer-de-lance, the first Nero Wolfe book. Had read everything Wolfean a couple decades ago, and decided to enjoy it all over again.
     

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