Balmoral Boots

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by manton, Jun 9, 2007.

  1. bigshoe

    bigshoe One of the Regulars

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    It is a type of balmoral that allows the use of a gusset tounge.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Isshinryu101

    Isshinryu101 One Too Many

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    Very nice work! However, they are Derby Boots. Open lacing = Derby/ blucher. Closed lacing = balmoral/ oxford.
     
  3. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

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    Not entirely correct, at least not traditionally. While nowadays the terms balmoral and oxford are pretty much interchangeable, that hasn't always been the case.

    The characteristic of a balmoral is not the lacing but the horizontal side seam, instead of the more common curved seam. While most balmorals have closed oxford lacing, a derby with a horizontal side seam would be classified as a balmoral. The advantage of the horizontal seam is that it makes the boots/shoes more waterproof.

    That means that for example the Allen Edmonds Fifth Street boots and the vintage boots posted by LuvMyMan on the previous page are technically oxford boots and not balmoral boots, while the discussed boots by bigshoe, while derbys, are indeed balmorals.

    That said, I agree that oxford boots are what this thread is about, regardless of the title.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  4. bigshoe

    bigshoe One of the Regulars

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    Any thing with a full horizontal seam is a balmoral
     
  5. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    I used to be able to find really heavy duty Polish work boots in that Balmoral style. I don't think I've seen any for 20 years.
     
  6. bigshoe

    bigshoe One of the Regulars

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    I made a few pair of these. model 1939 polish army boots.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    They have quite a shaped heel for an army boot.

    They are quite similar to the Polish work boots, although the work boots had a padded top.
     
  8. Isshinryu101

    Isshinryu101 One Too Many

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    Both 100% correct. Apologies for the misuse of the term of art. I was coming from a more modern view based on the aesthetic of the oxford boot being more "dressy" and the derby more "casual". Modern styles have repositioned the above posted boots as closer to a "work boot" than a "dress boot".
     
  9. bigshoe

    bigshoe One of the Regulars

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    The heel was tapered as I had to fit a size 13 boot to a size 9 original polish heel plate. A very good point, modern styles have changed the names for example this is my repro of a 1930's U.S. Navy work boot issued to enlisted sailors, today it is a dress boot.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Isshinryu101

    Isshinryu101 One Too Many

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    100% work boot stylewise.
     
  11. LuvMyMan

    LuvMyMan I’ll Lock Up.

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    You made that? WOW! Super nice work. Somewhere in our home here is a big tote plastic container that has some vintage boots in it. A few pairs are similar to this boot here, but, have true spade soles. The boots in your picture as simple as they are looks wise, have an appeal due to just being so clean, neat looking without the overall shape being "played with" by punching/brogue work. MY husband desires to make shoes and boots, and we so appreciate the skill set it takes to make them.
     
  12. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    National Cloak and Suit Company, Fall-winter 1919-20:

    [​IMG]

    National Cloak and Suit Company, Fall-winter 1922-23. Balmoral with tarsal strap effect, here called 'saddle strap':

    [​IMG]

    Chicago Mail Order Company, Fall-Winter 1921. ditto, here called 'ball strap':

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2014
  13. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Tarsal strap Balmoral boots. HBK: that must be your dream boot.
     
  14. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    they certainly are.

    here's two more from Chicago Mail Order Company, Fall-Winter 1921. both with 'ball strap':

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. simonc

    simonc Practically Family

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    I'm very hot on how the toe box is totally flat (a feature sorely overlooked these days) and the heel is like a good 1 3/4" to 2"
     
  16. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    new Septieme Largeurs ('Marceau' in burgundy) after a bit of wearing:

    [​IMG]
     
    djmajj likes this.
  17. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Are those the same ones that Barmey has in tan? How are you finding them? Barmey seems to be enjoying his.
     
  18. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    TT, yes. Barmey's are 'old brown'. i really like them. they seamlessly fit into an early '20s look, which is what i go for most of the time these days.
     
  19. simonc

    simonc Practically Family

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    Toe Box could be flatter, modern last...
     
  20. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    are you talking about how the sole of the toe area is flat to the floor ?
     

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