do you have names for meals? like a Nickname for special dishes?

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by green papaya, Jan 7, 2022.

  1. green papaya

    green papaya One Too Many

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    back in the Old West they had nicknames for foods like "Son-of-a-Bitch-Stew"

    (in the Old West) a stew often prepared by chuck-wagon cooks for working cowboys, containing tripe and often also the heart, liver, brains, kidney, etc., of a slaughtered steer.

    https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/12658/27-cowboy-slang-terms-things-you-eat-and-drink

    I often save asian leftovers with rice or noodles and whatever I have , and sometimes add soup , a few vegetables , a little meat, etc and call it a "HANOI HILTON SPECIAL" because it resembles scraps that they might serve a POW.

    I usually use it for breakfast
     
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  2. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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    Manta-Platte = Currywurst with red/white (Ketchup/Mayonnaise topped) fries.

    Mafia-Torte = Pizza
     
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  3. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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    Nonnenfürzle/Nonnenfötzchen (Nun-Farts/Nun-C.nts) = Small deep fried choux pastry balls rolled in icing sugar.

    Lamm-Knoppers = Döner Kebab
     
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  4. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    I make something we've always called Chicken Shit. (or "merde de poulet" - we actualy did tried to come up with more polite name for it, honestly we did, but nothing stuck.) It's a stick to the ribs stew/porridge/casserole type thing that I came up with once upon a time. I basically threw together things I like. - Sautee up some boneless-skinless chicken thighs with some onions, mushrooms (lots). Add a can (maybe 2) of drained red pinto beans and a can of Campbell's cream of mushroom soup then top with water and stock cover and cook. Add a box of uncle Ben's wild rice (I don't use the flavor packet. Other rice will do too) and an entire jar of drained green olives with pimento. I sometimes add black olives too. It all comes together and gets thick and porridge-like. It's even better warmed over with some hot sauce.

    [edit: I forgot to add a healthy handful of frozen corn to it. It's a very flexible recipe, as you can imagine.]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2022
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  5. Frunobulax

    Frunobulax

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    Scroff - at the end of a camping trip, you throw everything left in the cooler into the cast iron skillet, heat it over the fire, and finish it off before breaking camp.

    And thanks to my niece, now in her mid-40s and an accomplished physician, Lasagna is forever known in our house as "anya." When she was little, she couldn't pronounce lasagna, and it stuck.
     
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  6. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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    Heaven And Earth = Fried apple slices or mashed apples, potatoes, fried blutwurst and fried onion rings.
     
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  7. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Anything made with macaroni and tomato sauce, no matter how or by whom, was known in our family as "slum."
     
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  8. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Love it! I'll occasionally do something like that for breakfast when I'm home alone. A bit of whatever happens to be in the fridge, scramble a couple of eggs in it, maybe a bit of cheese and a dash or two of hot sauce (maybe ketchup) and I'm good to go. I'm not a fussy eater.
     
  9. green papaya

    green papaya One Too Many

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    split pea soup & ship's biscuits "Limey Soup"

    Spaghetti - "Bisghetti" or "Busgetty" my childhood pronunciation
     
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  10. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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    Phosphatschlauch = phosphate hose for any kind of small sausage such as Wiener, Frankfurter, Krakauer, Bratwurst…
     
  11. Frunobulax

    Frunobulax

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    Phosphate hose? Can you please expand on that?
     
  12. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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  13. The closest my wife and I get would be when one of us wants spaghetti/pasta the way her mom used to make it, or the way my mom used to make it. Y'see, her mom was born and raised in Italy, learned how to cook as she grew older, and had her own recipe for tomato-based pasta sauce handed down through the generations. It took all day to make because of the slow simmer, then was best if you let it sit for a day so all of the ingredients could blend properly. Delicious! My mom, on the other hand, was born here in the U.S. though she was Sicilian, and her parents were wealthy so she never learned how to cook or do the usual housework because they had maids that did that for them. Over time she did learn a few things though, so her spaghetti sauce recipe was simply to add butter and Lawry's Garlic Salt to the pasta.

    So, the "nicknames" were either "Your mom's" pasta or "My mom's" pasta, and we knew which was which by which of us was talking. :cool:

    There have been a number of times in my life when I've found some leftovers in the refrigerator and made more of a meal out of them by scrambling in two or three eggs and throwing some shredded cheese and a little hot sauce on the whole mess. Regardless of the ingredients, I usually refer to it as "kitchen sink hash".
     
  14. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
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    Several service staples carried over to civilian life. Creamed chipped beef, a breakfast dish served
    over toast, world famous as shit-on-shingle. Coffee is turpentine. Hot dogs and beans, a mess hall
    payday fare is stars and stripes. Other things, unusual but field/war necessity fare include goats,
    used to instruct knife kill techniques, then sent to grill fires; dogs, wild boar, rats. Squirrels, rodents.
    All have various name tags, local as well as ubiquitous moniker. Deer, turkey. Vic for venison,
    Tom for the bird, not just turkey. Rat stew is Saigon. Alligator simply croc or Cajun. Snake was always
    rattle or ratler. Yum yum.:)
     
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  15. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Location:
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    We absolutely love SOS fo breakfast, though almost always with ground beef (brown gravy version with mashed for supper. Very rarely creamed dried beef. Growing up we have that with baked potatoes and peas for supper.
     
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  16. LostInTyme

    LostInTyme One of the Regulars

    My Mom used to make a spaghetti-like substance. It had ground beef, perhaps some tiny meatballs made out of the same ground beef, cut up onions and green pepper, tomato sauce and spaghetti-like noodles. We called it "Slum Goomie." When I was very little, I didn't particularly like eggs in any state. So, in order for me to eat them, she would make scrambled eggs and serve them to me with some type of sweet jelly smeared on top. I think it was probably strawberry jelly, never jam or preserves, always jelly. She called the concoction, "Chicken-on-the-ranch." Well, I didn't particularly like it, but she had gone to so much trouble making it, I managed to consume it without throwing up.
     
  17. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

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    Sounds a lot like what was called “goulash” in my childhood home, a concoction which scarcely resembled anything a Hungarian would so call.

    It was elbow macaroni with ground beef and onion and maybe diced green bell peppers and various spices in a tomato sauce. It was quick and easy and along with white bread filled those half a dozen bellies on the cheap.

    And it was certainly more than palatable. The Old Man, for all his shortcomings, was borderline masterful at creating tasty meals from inexpensive ingredients. It was from him that I learned that the tougher cuts of beef are often the more flavorful, if you cook ’em right.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2022
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  18. Turnip

    Turnip Call Me a Cab

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    My dad, born 1932, always used to say „IG Farben Zucker“ for sweetener.
    He also used „Kommodenlack“ = commode paint for cheap, sweetish red wines and „Surius“ for cheap whites.
     
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  19. Fifty150

    Fifty150 One Too Many

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    I went to a Japanese restaurant in El Paso, TX. I sat at the sushi bar. I asked the sushi chef for a few things. He laughed. Said something along the lines of "this is Texas, we don't have real sushi". A little more banter. He said that he'll have the kitchen bring me the best thing that they serve in the restaurant. A steak came out. The owner of the restaurant said that they only served American style rolls, and that their ingredients were not good quality. I suspect that most sushi restaurants in The USA are similar.
     
  20. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    897
    Location:
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    Well there's your problem right there.
     
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