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LorenWho

New in Town
Messages
37
I
I have a client that I block his hats on a 63cm long oval block. Just buy a flange that suits the head size with a 2 5/8" brim, but you would have to specify the degree of brim cupping. How steep do you want the cupping? If you have a flange with a gradual slope that is 2 7/8" wide you could use it but you would end up with a very gentle slope on the cupping.
I was just thinking about what size 3D printer would be needed to print out a flange. My hat size is 57cm and I prefer a brim on a fedora to be between 2 5/8 and 2 3/4.
 
Messages
10,273
Location
vancouver, canada
I

I was just thinking about what size 3D printer would be needed to print out a flange. My hat size is 57cm and I prefer a brim on a fedora to be between 2 5/8 and 2 3/4.
I have no idea. I am a hat maker and was joking with the flange maker that we are both artisans using techniques/technology that are over a century apart. He is an engineer and works for a company that makes 3D printers. He is such a geek that 3D printing is what he does in his spare time as well.
 

LorenWho

New in Town
Messages
37
I have no idea. I am a hat maker and was joking with the flange maker that we are both artisans using techniques/technology that are over a century apart. He is an engineer and works for a company that makes 3D printers. He is such a geek that 3D printing is what he does in his spare time as well.
Belfastboy,

Lucky, you are!
 

shopkin

New in Town
Messages
33
Having paid the bill for several of our son's 3D printers I can say that this better work because the investment in machine and filament will be significant. A CNC machine and wood would make more sense for this application.
 

LorenWho

New in Town
Messages
37
Having paid the bill for several of our son's 3D printers I can say that this better work because the investment in machine and filament will be significant. A CNC machine and wood would make more sense for this application.

Shopkin,

Is your son planning on 3D printing blocks and flanges?

Thanks,

-Loren
 

shopkin

New in Town
Messages
33
Shopkin,

Is your son planning on 3D printing blocks and flanges?

Thanks,

-Loren
Well, he's obliged to print whatever I want.... considering the circumstances, But something like a hat block or flange would take a full roll of filament even if they were hollow. If hollow, the requred thickness would have to be sorted out.

I'd be inclined to shape laminated chunks of wood on the CNC router. But, then again, I make pattern hats and don't really use blocks or flanges much
 
Last edited:
Messages
10,273
Location
vancouver, canada
Well, he's obliged to print whatever I want.... considering the circumstances, But something like a hat block or flange would take a full roll of filament even if they were hollow. If hollow, the requred thickness would have to be sorted out.

I'd be inclined to shape laminated chunks of wood on the CNC router. But, then again, I make pattern hats and don't really use blocks or flanges much
A fellow hatter in my city has branched out into making blocks & flanges. He is a former cabinet maker and has access to a CNC machine. His blocks/flanges are magnificent in a hardwood but pricey. My 3D print guy works for a company that manufactures 3D printers, it is his work and his passionate hobby. I plan to pick up 2 or 3 sets of flanges to fill in the holes. I know nothing about the business but this guy does (he is an engineer). He is willing and he makes money even with his low prices. Randall Alan (RA Hat Blocks) out of NY city has been selling 3D printed hat making tools for a number of years and must be making money as he is still there. There are a number of other newer sellers on ETSY in the 3D print business. Some classic wooden makers are now offering 3D print items as a lower priced alternative to the wood.
 
Messages
10,273
Location
vancouver, canada
I have long wanted to upgrade my ironing and steam source and yesterday it arrived. A professional grade Reliable steam boiler, iron and hand held steamer attachment. It produces a dry steam, delivers it under pressure in huge amounts. This will be a great upgrade and ease the blocking, ironing and creasing. The hand held is the red item in the foreground. It will replace my little hand held clothing steamer.
relaible3.jpg
relaible3.jpg
 

LorenWho

New in Town
Messages
37
Sweet
I have long wanted to upgrade my ironing and steam source and yesterday it arrived. A professional grade Reliable steam boiler, iron and hand held steamer attachment. It produces a dry steam, delivers it under pressure in huge amounts. This will be a great upgrade and ease the blocking, ironing and creasing. The hand held is the red item in the foreground. It will replace my little hand held clothing steamer. View attachment 586635 View attachment 586635

Belfastboy,

Sweet steaming setup!

But I, couldn't help notice that the three hat blocks have three different surface treatments. One looks like it was coated with a polyurethane or varnish, another looks like it has no sealant or coating at all, and the third looks like it has an oil finish.

Did you finish any of them? Do you have a preference?

Thanks,

-Loren
 
Messages
10,273
Location
vancouver, canada
Sweet


Belfastboy,

Sweet steaming setup!

But I, couldn't help notice that the three hat blocks have three different surface treatments. One looks like it was coated with a polyurethane or varnish, another looks like it has no sealant or coating at all, and the third looks like it has an oil finish.

Did you finish any of them? Do you have a preference?

Thanks,

-Loren
The one on the top I coated with a Varathane Diamond coat as I added an extension to the bottom of the block.

The bottom 2 are from the same maker and he uses an oil based coating used to coat wooden masts on sail boats. The name escapes me right now. They both work well. I cover my vintage flanges with cling wrap but do not bother covering my blocks when I block a felt.
 

LorenWho

New in Town
Messages
37
The one on the top I coated with a Varathane Diamond coat as I added an extension to the bottom of the block.

The bottom 2 are from the same maker and he uses an oil based coating used to coat wooden masts on sail boats. The name escapes me right now. They both work well. I cover my vintage flanges with cling wrap but do not bother covering my blocks when I block a felt.

Interesting. Thank you!
 

T Jones

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,587
Location
Central Ohio
I have long wanted to upgrade my ironing and steam source and yesterday it arrived. A professional grade Reliable steam boiler, iron and hand held steamer attachment. It produces a dry steam, delivers it under pressure in huge amounts. This will be a great upgrade and ease the blocking, ironing and creasing. The hand held is the red item in the foreground. It will replace my little hand held clothing steamer. View attachment 586635 View attachment 586635
Nice.
 

Noeldaigle

New in Town
Messages
6
I may be in the wrong spot entirely here, I’m new to the forum. I will gladly move this post if I need to.

I’m brand new at learning hat making. I’m HOOKED. I started out buying blank wool felts and decorating them up and loved it so much I wanted to learn how to make my own hats start to finish.

I have watched a lot of tutorials and purchased a fair number of supplies to get me started based off of some of the YouTube videos I watched in order to get started.

The issue I keep encountering: I bought hat blocks from hat shapers (the tutorial I watched recommend this). I realize now their shapers are really more for wet molding and I’m wanting to make cowboy hats, rancher hats, wide brim hats, fedoras, classic shapes etc.

The hat shapers I bought are nice to start with and affordable but it seems to make the crown part of the hat really small. I think that might be fine for certain people who like that look but it looks a bit funny to me, too. I feel like I need a hat block that gives me morenheightbtonworo with in the crown so I can shape the hat however I want without feeling like it then becomes too short.

Can anyone recommend a solid hat block I can buy in both a women’s and men’s standard size? (I’ll add more hat blocks to my collection in other sizes as I’m able to).

I hope what I’m asking makes sense, I can provide photos if that helps.

I really enjoy this forum, I have already spent a few weeks reading many old posts on here that has helped me a lot in this journey!

God Bless
 

dmeist

New in Town
Messages
31
Location
Ohio
I may be in the wrong spot entirely here, I’m new to the forum. I will gladly move this post if I need to.

I’m brand new at learning hat making. I’m HOOKED. I started out buying blank wool felts and decorating them up and loved it so much I wanted to learn how to make my own hats start to finish.

I have watched a lot of tutorials and purchased a fair number of supplies to get me started based off of some of the YouTube videos I watched in order to get started.

The issue I keep encountering: I bought hat blocks from hat shapers (the tutorial I watched recommend this). I realize now their shapers are really more for wet molding and I’m wanting to make cowboy hats, rancher hats, wide brim hats, fedoras, classic shapes etc.

The hat shapers I bought are nice to start with and affordable but it seems to make the crown part of the hat really small. I think that might be fine for certain people who like that look but it looks a bit funny to me, too. I feel like I need a hat block that gives me morenheightbtonworo with in the crown so I can shape the hat however I want without feeling like it then becomes too short.

Can anyone recommend a solid hat block I can buy in both a women’s and men’s standard size? (I’ll add more hat blocks to my collection in other sizes as I’m able to).

I hope what I’m asking makes sense, I can provide photos if that helps.

I really enjoy this forum, I have already spent a few weeks reading many old posts on here that has helped me a lot in this journey!

God Bless
I started over a year ago. Purchased some blocks from several companies including Hat Blocks Australia (http://www.hatblocksaustralia.com.au/open-crowns), currently my favorite place to order from. Nice people and very helpful. The blocks are (IMO) the best, although I have not purchased from Guy Morse-Brown (https://www.hatblocks.co.uk/), which look really nice. Other than that, I keep an eye on ebay to see what comes up.
 

Noeldaigle

New in Town
Messages
6
And I guess one more question….. what’s everyone’s favorite way to stiffen the brims? I’ve used hairspray, shellac, and khals. They all seem pretty good but I’m unable to get super stiff brims. I don’t mind some not being real stiff but would like to be able to make super stiff brims too.
 

BigHat

New in Town
Messages
30
I’ve bought half a dozen capelines here in uk from various suppliers. All Czech made rabbit fur. So far the most expensive have the best finish that require minimal pouncing. But what I’ve noticed within the same supplier, is the inconsistency of the stiffening. Is this common? Have any of you had similar issues?
 

Darrell2688

One of the Regulars
Messages
285
Location
Piner, Kentucky
And I guess one more question….. what’s everyone’s favorite way to stiffen the brims? I’ve used hairspray, shellac, and khals. They all seem pretty good but I’m unable to get super stiff brims. I don’t mind some not being real stiff but would like to be able to make super stiff brims too.
I use Super Blonde shellac flacks that I purchased from a store on Etsy and 95% denatured alcohol that I buy on Amazon, I desolve the flakes in about 16 ounces of the alcohol then apply it with a paint brush, you could also put it in a spray bottle and spray the brim, however with spray, wear a good mask and you will get it on the crown also, so I suggest using a brush, dip the brush in the mixture and apply in lite coats, let it dry between coats until you get the stiffeness that you want. If you get it too stiff, you can always iron the brim with a good steam iron a couple of times. Another way to stiffen up the brim would be to spritz the hat with rubbing alcohol then ise a Bic Lighter, that will burn off any lose fibers and also stiffen the hat. I have also just sprayed the hat with denatured alcohol completely and let it dry, the felts stiffen up a lot and then I use a steam iron to soften them up if they are to stiff. I am sure that there has to be another way to stiffen up the brims or even clear up soft places in the brim.

I am working on a dark chocolate rabbit fur felt right now and there was a really soft spot in the brim felt and I wet the felt then used a steam iron on that area of the felt, that took care of the soft spot and made the brim flat and equalized the stiffness in the brim.

This has been my experience working with felts, hopefully someone else will have something to add or correct anything that I have suggested.
 

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