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Name Something That Your Mother or Grandmother Cooked That Was Your Favorite!

Discussion in 'The Display Case' started by 2jakes, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. csmorris

    csmorris New in Town

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Calgary Alberta Canada
    Mom's Yorkshire pudding. It was made in a rectangular pan, not muffin tins, and was fairly dense and moist. I would rise to about 1" thick in the middle and about 2" around the sides. Great hot with gravy and almost better as a cold leftover with a little salt on it. I've never seen it made the same since; I've only ever seen the big puffy hollow muffin tin variety.
     
  2. belfastboy

    belfastboy Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,154
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Never knew either of my grandmothers but I loved my Mom's cinnamon buns. Convinced my wife to make them for breakfast this morning......as good or better!
     
  3. crawlinkingsnake

    crawlinkingsnake One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    West Virginia
    I had an aunt that made amazing oven fried chicken. Also great bread pudding.
    My grandmother could make a meal out of almost anything. Guess that's what you learn to do when growing up in the time she did.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
    2jakes likes this.
  4. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,474
    Location:
    New Forest
    There was a dance school that my wife and I used to teach at on Sunday mornings. After which we would head to a local pub that served traditional roast beef lunches. But instead of one or two small Yorkshire puddings on the plate the whole meal came nestling in a large oblong variety. It was a blissful joy.

    The UK had food rationing right up and until 1954, so with a scarcity of meat it was a case of make do. My mother used to make a stew using rabbit, the vegetables were plentiful, like most people we grew our own. But the way my mother used to fill me up was with dumplings, no matter how many she would put on my plate, I would always eat the lot. Nowadays, I can't abide the smell of rabbit being cooked.
     
    2jakes likes this.
  5. Doctor Strange

    Doctor Strange I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,442
    Location:
    Hudson Valley, NY
    My grandmother made awesome chicken soup... pretty much as you'd expect from an old-school (*) Jewish grandmother!

    GrandmaGoldfarb@OllinvillePark.JPG

    (* Came as an immigrant circa 1905, illiterate, but ran a Manhattan candy store for thirty years!)
     
    2jakes and BobHufford like this.
  6. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    18,236
    Location:
    London, UK
    Nana Marlowe made the most incredible rhubarb tart, tough alas she had to give up the baking in her seventies when her arthritis got bad; she died in 2005 aged 86. She was the grandparent to whom I was closest; I think part of the joy of rhubarb for me to this day is that association.

    My mother rasied us on shepherd's pie, wonderful stuff. We ate a lot of lamb then, possibly more than beef, until my mother got it into her head that our sheep in NI were being 'contaminated' by Sellafield over the water.... then we switched to beef mince instead. At least until the BSE hoo hah....
     
  7. OldStrummer

    OldStrummer A-List Customer

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Ashburn, Virginia USA
    My mother made lamb patties. I think she added some smoke seasoning to the ground meat before frying. I've never found another like it.

    She also made what she referred to as "risi bisi," but it wasn't like the Italian dish other than it had rice and peas. She would generally just toss in some leftover veggies from the night before and season it up a bit. Delicious!
     
  8. galopede

    galopede One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    190
    Location:
    Gloucester, England
    My favourite from my mother was another rationing wartime special I suppose, corned beef rissoles. Tin of corned beef (not the same as American corned beef!), mashed potato and raw onions. Mixed up and made into round patties about 1" thick. Rolled in flour the fried in lard until the outside was brown and crisp!

    Delicious with HP sauce. Still make them myself occasionally

    Gareth
     
    2jakes likes this.
  9. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,327
    Location:
    Elysian Fields ☀️
    Salmon croquettes.
    I’ve managed to make some which I enjoy, but are never as good as my mother’s. :(
     
  10. Inkstainedwretch

    Inkstainedwretch Practically Family

    Messages:
    942
    Location:
    United States
    My grandmother made the best banana pudding in the history of the universe. When I got interested in cooking in the late '70s I asked her for her recipe but she'd had a stroke and couldn't remember.
     
  11. Old fashion cream pie. Not quite as sugary as sugar cream pie.
    More like this....

     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  12. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Cobourg
    Pizza dough is basically Italian bread dough. There must be recipes online. Use good ingredients to make good pizza. From someone who used to run a pizzaria.
     
  13. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Cobourg
    Mom's apple pie of course and grandmother's oelbollen a treat we had on new year's eve, if you are not familiar they are a Dutch fritter with peel, raisins, and bits of apple in them, deep fried and rolled in powdered sugar served with coffee (or milk for the little ones).
     
  14. 2jakes

    2jakes I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,327
    Location:
    Elysian Fields ☀️
    I was able to locate the ingredients but was told by owners of a pizzaria that I require an oven
    with at least 900º degrees in order to achieve the same results.
    The highest I can go with the stove is about 750º.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2018
  15. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Cobourg
    Somebody was bullshitting you. 750 is hotter than a self cleaning oven in other words, your pizza will burst into flames and turn into ash in minutes. Pizza ovens are around 450 and that is hot enough to cook a pie in 10 minutes.

    In a pizza oven with fire brick floor you start the pizza in a pan then take out the pan and finish the pizza on the fire brick to toast the crust. In a regular oven use a screen instead of a pan for the same 'toasty crust' effect. Otherwise the crust is apt to be limp and soggy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2018
  16. belfastboy

    belfastboy Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,154
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Sunday dinner....roast beef, gravy and mashed potatoes. Mom made the best gravy. Her Yorkshire pudding was hit and miss. When it hit it was great but many times it just did not rise up? Yorkshire Pudding with ED!
     
    robrinay likes this.
  17. belfastboy

    belfastboy Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,154
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Yes, my Mom always went the muffin tin route....with middling success.
     
    robrinay likes this.
  18. robrinay

    robrinay One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,085
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    Unless they were talking degrees Fahrenheit rather than Celsius/Centigrade. In which case they were recommending 480 deg.C when they said 900deg F. But that’s still a bit hot for pizza as 450deg.C is best.
     
  19. green papaya

    green papaya One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,157
    Location:
    California, usa
    egg rolls, fried chicken dinners, dim sum, barbecure spare ribs , barbecued chicken
     
  20. Inkstainedwretch

    Inkstainedwretch Practically Family

    Messages:
    942
    Location:
    United States
    My grandmother made the best banana pudding I ever ate. With vanilla wafers and meringue topping. She made it with a double boiler and I've never been able to duplicate it.
     
    2jakes likes this.

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