Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds
  • The Fedora Lounge is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

Old gas stations

Messages
10,755
Location
My mother's basement
Minneapolis, 1941, according to the source I lifted this from.

IMG_3556.jpeg
 

RossRYoung

Practically Family
Messages
919
Could be common in the Midwest still, though my exposure to the term has only been through a handful of coworkers who are all CDL tractor drivers.
 
Messages
10,755
Location
My mother's basement
Could be common in the Midwest still, though my exposure to the term has only been through a handful of coworkers who are all CDL tractor drivers.
Makes sense, seeing how my early years were spent mostly in the Upper Midwest. Maybe that’s still the more common usage there. I’ll ask a cousin or two.
 
Messages
17,837
Tow trucks were still commonly called “wreckers” in my early years. It’s been quite some time since that was the more common usage.

Could be common in the Midwest still, though my exposure to the term has only been through a handful of coworkers who are all CDL tractor drivers.
I think “wreckers” are still used for big, off-road recoveries but with the advent of front wheel drive, transaxles, etc, “roll offs” are the more common now.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
33,345
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
We had an entire display of pipes and pipe accessories on top of the Coke machine. My uncle had bought it from a snappy-talking salesman at some indeterminate point, and as far as anyone ever knew he was the only one who ever bought any of the stuff off the display. Or at least I think he "bought" it.

The entire office of that station was filthy with nicotine. I spent an entire afternoon, when I was about fifteen, scrubbing off all the yellow that had accumulated on the walls and cabinets since 1940, but nobody warned me I should wear gloves. I was sick for three days.
 
Messages
17,015
Location
New York City
We had an entire display of pipes and pipe accessories on top of the Coke machine. My uncle had bought it from a snappy-talking salesman at some indeterminate point, and as far as anyone ever knew he was the only one who ever bought any of the stuff off the display. Or at least I think he "bought" it.

The entire office of that station was filthy with nicotine. I spent an entire afternoon, when I was about fifteen, scrubbing off all the yellow that had accumulated on the walls and cabinets since 1940, but nobody warned me I should wear gloves. I was sick for three days.

When my father stopped smoking in the '70s, my mom and I spent weeks scrubbing "yellow" off of everything in the house. It was a nasty job - I remember using an old toothbrush to clean small nooks and crevices on odd surfaces. A disgusting job, but great - truly great - to live in a smoke-free house. It looked and smelled like a different house when we were done. Thankfully, my dad never started smoking again - a fear my mom and I had for a year or more until we were convinced he was truly done.
 
Last edited:

Forum statistics

Threads
107,913
Messages
3,050,054
Members
53,202
Latest member
Casch
Top