Pocketwatches

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Nathan Flowers, Sep 27, 2003.

  1. viclip

    viclip Practically Family

    Messages:
    552
    Location:
    Canada
    I don't think there's any question that your Hampden New Railway 23-jewel qualified as an American grade railroad watch. It would also likely have been so accepted in Canada by the CPR time inspectors on an ad hoc basis. Enjoy your fantastic find. If you are aware of any provenance, please do share it!

    If you want to really get into it, I'd suggest that you go to the following forum on the site of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors, in which you can participate even as a non-member (but without access to many resources):

    https://mb.nawcc.org/forums/american-pocket-watches.11/

    Respecting the gap between 1902 & 1907, while that could just be due to chance elements, based on my experience there are often gaps in production. This is noted in figures for other watch companies. I'm sure there were various reasons such as the enthusiastic over-producing of new models, downturns in the economy, cut-throat sales tactics by competitors etc.
     
    busmatt and M Hatman like this.
  2. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,409
    Location:
    New York City
    We live in a ninety year old apartment house and my girlfriend was working in its back garden a few days ago and found this. While it's junk now (way past any salvage efforts I'd guess), thought this group would still enjoy seeing and also would love to hear if anyone knows anything about it.
    IMG_5621.JPG IMG_5622.JPG IMG_5623.JPG
     
  3. Artifex

    Artifex Familiar Face

    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    Nottingham, GB
    The poor thing!

    A little web sleuthing reveals that these were made by Ingraham for Sears (who owned the "Tower" brand). As the flaking chrome-plating, acrylic crystal, and the construction imply, it's an inexpensive "dollar watch".

    The dial design resembles WWII-era graphic design (at least, the sort we had in Britain). My (utterly uninformed) guess would be that it was made soon after the war as a cheap imitation of millitary-issue watches.

    Be careful with the radium paint on the dial. The radiation hazard is small, but be certain not to get any flakes or dust stuck on or in(!) your person.

    Edit:
    There's an auction listing for a very similar watch (in better condition!) here:
    TOWER RADIUM - BLACK DIAL - WORKING - INGRAHAM 60 -- CASE CHROMIUM PLATED BRASS
    With pictures:
    ingraham_tower_watch_1of3.jpg
    ingraham_tower_watch_3of3.jpg
    ingraham_tower_watch_2of3.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 8, 2019
  4. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,409
    Location:
    New York City
    Wow - thank you, incredible information. I said to my girlfriend when she found it that someone on FL would know what it was.

    Also, I appreciate the warning Re the radium. I guess, unless there's a reason not to, we will toss it. I'm all for (very, very passionate about) saving old things, but I also recognize that there is a time when something has truly become junk and I think this watch is there.

    Thank you again, FF
     
  5. Artifex

    Artifex Familiar Face

    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    Nottingham, GB
    I find deciding to discard historical artifacts very difficult, but I think you'd be right to do so in this case. There are more old watches out there than people willing to look after them, so a decision to give attention to rusty junk is equivalent to a decision to neglect any number of pieces that are rarer, in better condition, or of greater technical or social significance.
     
    Keith Garrison and Fading Fast like this.

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