Pouncing

Discussion in 'Hats' started by bloc, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Yahoody

    Yahoody Practically Family

    Messages:
    758
    Location:
    Great Basin
    Naw, good question. Better to ask than ruin a felt. I've only worked with 100% beaver blanks from Winchester. So take it for what it is worth. I go counter on top and counter on the bottom. Mostly because I am right handed and it is the easiest way for me to sand the felt. Hat class instructor said it mattered but I am not so sure it does as long as you always go in the same direction once you start. If you watch the felt as you pounce and the nap on the felt is getting really torn up...likely better go the other direction and see if that tones everything down some.
     
    T Jones, crhIndyfan, steur and 3 others like this.
  2. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    Hi Yahoody, thanks for your reply. Some really great advice here. By the sound of things, I think I would feel better if it were you sanding the hat rather than this rookie aha. But no, thanks for your opinion!
     
    deadlyhandsome likes this.
  3. suitedcboy

    suitedcboy One Too Many

    I agree 100% with Yahoody. I have Purchased some 100% and 50% beaver hats that I wanted to have more velvet like finish. I sanded with 1000 grit and I found inconsistencies with which way got the fine finish. I know some hat restorations are done by turning hat inside out. The sanding on some of these hats I ordered new from hatmakers or bought new factory made, that sanded reverse of the normal "grain" made me think that some hat bodies are turned inside out. I never asked the hatmakers if they invert the bodies to get the better color distribution or lesser flaws. I was a bit reluctant to ask since I was taking sandpaper to a hat recently obtained from their artisan hands.
     
    crhIndyfan and deadlyhandsome like this.
  4. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,641
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    To me the pouncing of a felt is the alchemy of hat making. It is the fun process but also the one that produces the most anxiety......I never know what will be uncovered. In a Winchester beaver I uncovered a divot that appeared to be a moth nibble but was just a void in the felt exposed when the top veneer was removed. Another, a Tonak felt revealed a flaw in the dye when I cut the brim and uncovered about a centimetre of poor dye penetration. Then there is the dreaded uncovering of the shellac layer that reveals the mottling of the colour. For this I have learned that denatured alcohol is my saviour. I have recovered felts that I thought I would have to toss as they were not saleable with that mottling but the alcohol dissolved the shellac and drove it deeper into the felt. I have resigned myself that engaging in learning the art/craft of hatting I will end up with a pile of discarded felts sitting in the corner taunting me with my failures.
     
    Gobi, Rmccamey, crhIndyfan and 5 others like this.
  5. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
    Central Ohio
    Send that pile of discarded felts my way. I'll make hats out of them and then sell them as "distressed"! There seems to be a sizeable market for distressed fashion these days, especially in hats. With a little imagination you can sometimes turn failures into something successful. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2020
  6. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,641
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    I have totally overlooked that 'distressed' marketplace.
     
    crhIndyfan and T Jones like this.
  7. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

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    5,564
    Location:
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    I'm actually kinda liking the distressed look, as long it looks natural and not something that's noticeably artificially done. I even scavenge and save old stained and slightly tattered hat ribbons and brim bindings to reuse on conversion projects where I want to get that slightly distressed look....

    Old faded out and slightly distressed '50s era 3X Stetson Western conversion. The hat ribbon and brim binding came off of two different hats....
    Before:
    [​IMG]

    After: (I still haven't gotten around to sewing on the brim binding yet).
    [​IMG]
    Okay. Enough of me hijacking the thread.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
  8. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    I'm not big on the finer grits outside of beaver - in my particular case I'm working with rabbit. Rabbit just doesn't seem dense enough to give that fine beavery finish. But this is a really excellent point about turning the hat inside out. And it kind of cements it for me that anti-clockwise under the brim is the "right" way (even though it's left aha). Maybe one day my grandkids will find my creation and say "Hey wasn't it good he sanded counter clockwise, we can restore this!"
     
  9. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,641
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    I like to use the white coloured abrasive pads as a finishing step. It removes very little of the felt but does act to polish it a bit. Not sure if this is 'accepted' in the hatter's world but I like the affect.
     
  10. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    Two fine looking lids with plenty of character ;)
     
    T Jones likes this.
  11. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    I mean in my humble opinion I think there is a lot to be said for amateur hatters like us. With the right tools and enough nerve "profession" quality can easily be replicated so I don't think it really matters if it's accepted or not
     
  12. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    I mean I cut the ribbon off an old perfectly good Akubra Adventurer to reuse on my own creation just coz I liked it and the sweatband I'm using is vintage so I figure its all about creating the character of the hat - like a novelist writing a character in a book
     
    belfastboy and T Jones like this.
  13. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,564
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    Thank you buddy.
     
    crhIndyfan and deadlyhandsome like this.
  14. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,564
    Location:
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    I've done that with a few, myself. I call them my Frankenhats.

    This Frankenhat gave me some trouble, though. I tried to pounce it but it pounced back...
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
  15. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    5,641
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    I tend to be a mix of 'data collector' and 'ready, fire, aim. One of the great fun parts of learning the craft of hatting is making shit up, making my own tools, learning workarounds to the inevitable surprises and for better or worse I learn best from mistakes. I remember Art Fawcett saying that an aspect of being a master hatter is that his mistakes are never visited upon the client.....and after 5000+ hats he was still making the occasional mistake.
     
  16. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

    Messages:
    16
    I could never be a master hatter. I get too invested in the lids I start work on. Would want to keep them for myself when it came down to it haha
     
  17. crhIndyfan

    crhIndyfan New in Town

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    16
    Looks like my ex-wife
     
    T Jones likes this.
  18. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,641
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    That is why I took the leap to hanging out my shingle as a hatter......I have no more room for hats of my own....I am maxxed out. So in order to satisfy my hat lust I am forced to make them for others. I get the thrill of a new hat but don't have to find room to store it!!! I am developing my skills at making hats for women as that takes them an arms length out and thankfully don't have to overcome the urge to keep them and wear them!!!!
     
  19. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,564
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    I'd say something but my wife reads through FL sometimes and I'd be in for a big time a$$ whooping.
     
    crhIndyfan likes this.

  20. The better solution is to make them all in a size you can’t wear...say 7 5/8 long oval. Just trying to be helpful.
     
    crhIndyfan, Tukwila and Frunobulax like this.

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