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Show us your Thrift and/or yard sale finds

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13,417
Location
Orange County, CA
:D

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vintage.vendeuse

A-List Customer
Messages
355
At the same estate sale that I acquired the ties in this thread, I also purchased a box of love notes written in 1946/47 from then-girlfriend Lee to boyfriend Buck. (They were eventually married and the owner's of the home at which the sale took place.) Apparently, Lee worked for Chrysler Corporation because quite a few of the notes are in company envelopes or written on the back of partial pieces of company paper.

For the most part, the notes, though sweet, are very repetitive. She wrote him a quick note while at work every day and according to her remarks, he was also writing her love notes, though those were not found at the sale, if kept. An excerpt from one note:
"You know what my mother said this morning? That she would sign the papers for us so we can get married. Isn't that swell news? She said we see each other so much that we might just as well get married. So Buck, do you really want to marry me?? Or don't you think we should wait until I'm eighteen so by then you will know for sure if you really love me for all time." And later in the same note, "Honey, about getting married, don't you think we could wait until I'm eighteen. If you love me you will wait forever for me. Because myself I think it would be much better that way. I might become a woman and know what life is all about, don't you agree. But you know I can't wait until I marry my little darling, as I love you so much." This particular note, as are several, has a pink-lipsticked kiss at the end.

Buck and Lee DID end up getting married, though I don't know if they waited until she was eighteen. They had a long life together. :)

Buck was a bit older that Lee. Among the love notes were a few items pertaining to his service in the US Navy during WW2. There's a Liberty Card dated Jan. 10, 1946 for temporary leave from the USS ATR 21 (a rescue tug), a small piece of paper dated 6 Feb. 1946 from the USN Enlisted Personnel Separation Center of Great lakes, Illinois showing his agreement to return two blankets and one sheet, and there is also an undated contract Buck (his given name is William) signed at Guantanamo Bay. It's a rental agreement for a horse called "Smokey". Smokey is described as black with one white foot in front, and only 12 1/2 hands high. That's small, actually pony-size. Buck paid a one-time fee of $10 which gave him use of the horse for his entire tour of duty at that base, though he was also obligated to pay the feed bill monthly.

Why would Buck need such a small horse? Buck's rank is MoMM3c, which is Motor Machinist's Mate 3rd Class, and he worked in the boat shed.

Such an interesting little archive. Again, I'm amazed at what a family disposes of at these sales. I asked the person conducting the sale and he insisted that the son (Buck and Lee eventually had at two children, one of which pre-deceased them) had been through everything in the house and had already removed what he wanted to keep.

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Shangas

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,116
Location
Melbourne, Australia
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Solid brass candleholder. $12.

Manufactured by the Skultuna Brass Foundry, Skultuna, Sweden (est. 1607).

The company is still cranking out beautiful brassware today, 400+ years later! And they STILL manufacture the Office Candlestick (Model No. 68).

This is Model 68. The perfect candlestick for the working history writer. Me!
 

DNO

One Too Many
Messages
1,815
Location
Toronto, Canada
I had a pretty good week.

Found the items in the picture in a second hand store.

You did, indeed, have a good week...quite the haul for a second-hand shop. That looks like the water bottle and carrier from the 1903 Bandolier equipment. It used to be a fairly common find here in Canada because it was also used with our 'Oliver' equipment prior to the first war. Uncommon now (like everything else). The compasses look great as well.
 

Mr. Godfrey

Practically Family
I just picked up this typewriter in a charity shop, I have a bit of cleaning to do but I like the fact it has German keyboard and it's tidy size. I was going to just use the keys to make a sort of steampunk keyboard but cannot bring myself to break it up. I have no idea of a date for this thing but as it has no 1 key I know it's older than me. If any of you know how to date these?, I have had a look but cannot find any date/markings on it that are visible.

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Stearmen

I'll Lock Up
Messages
7,202
Picked these up a couple of weeks ago. The best thing about them was the price, free! She didn't want to drag them back into her house. The second best thing was, she called me, "a nice young man!"
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Shangas

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,116
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Mr. G., your typewriter is most likely prewar. 1920s-1930s. So about 80-90 years old. Continental was a big German manufacturer of typewriters.

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My latest purchase (third along from the left). Antique copper hot-water bottle.
 

Shangas

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,116
Location
Melbourne, Australia
The big long fat one on the left is from the 1800s. It was sold to me as a 'carriage warmer'. i.e.: You fill it with boiling water. Wrap it up, load it on a carriage and it'd keep you warm during the journey.

It holds a LOT of water. Almost three liters. Or about five and a half pints.
 
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