Show us your vehicles

Discussion in 'The Display Case' started by Tin Pan Sally, Mar 22, 2006.

What general era was your vehichle made:

  1. 30s or earlier

    36 vote(s)
    15.3%
  2. 40s

    25 vote(s)
    10.6%
  3. 50s

    39 vote(s)
    16.6%
  4. 60s

    49 vote(s)
    20.9%
  5. 70s-90s

    61 vote(s)
    26.0%
  6. New with classic features

    47 vote(s)
    20.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. carebear

    carebear My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,220
    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    Thanks John. I didn't want to hijack the thread but I saw it yesterday and figured this would be the place to ask.
     
  2. anabolina

    anabolina A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Seagoville, TX
    I've a 98 Ford Taurus that's nice and drives and stuff, but I went to the car show in the Texas State Fair and it was such fun to see thoses new cars and sit in them and see the cool new options. What I really want right now is a mini cooper convertible...

    [​IMG]

    Oh well, my car is fine, its paid for, gets decent gas milage, is reliable, and comfortable. I do NOT need a new car, I just want one. lol
     
  3. Bill Taylor

    Bill Taylor One of the Regulars

    Another First Car

    MrNewportCustom's description of his first car brought back memories of my first car. The first car I really owned on my own was a 1949 Mercury Convertible, which I bought from my Dad in the summer of 1950 after my first year in college. (for $500 - actually not as cheap as it sounds as it was 2 years old and had about 20,000 miles on it; my Dad had got it in the middle of 1948, about July, I think).

    However, before that, in the summer of 1946 three buddies and I (we were 14 and Sophomores in High School that year) bought a 1928 Model A Ford 4 Dr Sedan (Briggs Body, I think, with two side mounts). We got it from an elderly gentlemen who had purchased a new 1946 Ford and just wanted to get rid of the Model A. As he said, "it was about wore out". It was! We paid $60 for it. We had 20 bucks a piece ($80 in fives and ones - a fortune to us) to spend, so we had money left over.

    We went to the filling station (now "laughingly" called a service station) and got about 50 cents worth of gas, probably 2 and a half gallons). Gas tank is in front, next to firewall, an important fact. Then we went to one of the guy's home to wash it and clean it up. The house set up from the road on a steep incline and a long driveway went up that steep incline. Half way up the incline, she died. No amount of starting or hand cranking would get it started again.

    About that time, our buddies' Mother arrived home and of course, couldn't get into the driveway. After much questioning, as parents will do, we finally admitted that though we bought it and got it home, it wouldn't run (or start) anymore. She sort of looked over at the Model A, smiled, and said, you boys get back in the car while she was getting in the drivers seat. Without another word she put the car in neutral, let off the emergency brake and let the car roll back out onto the road, facing downhill. (uh oh) Then she turned over the starter and we roared off. Talk about four red faced embarrassed fourteen year old kids. Of course, it really was Henry Ford's fault for being too cheap to include a fuel pump on Model Ts and early As. That's why the gas tank was in front. Not realized by us, naturally, Mrs. W had learned to drive in those cars and knew the routine.

    I think by now, when they are sold, early A's have an added fuel pump and maybe even T's, although that would distract from originalality (sp).

    We made sure we never again parked on a hill or went up a steep one unless the tank was full. If not, you had to back up a steep hill to keep it running. Anyway, we had to carry a couple of buckets of water for the radiator, the wood frame was rotting as were the wood bows in the roof and it leaked like a sieve, so it didn't last too much longer, but we did get a summer or so use from it, then we sold it for $50. (inflation). And soon, we learned the art of wheedling the use of parents' cars and leaving for school 2 hours early in order to drive by and pick up as many friends as the car would hold. it is surprising how many kids you can get in a four door sedan. I remember one of the girls family had a 1947 Chrysler New Yorker and you could 10 in that car easily. And the doors would close, too.

    Bill
     
  4. Wow! Now those are some neat first hand memories. :eusa_clap
     
  5. fatwoul

    fatwoul Practically Family

    Messages:
    922
    Location:
    UK
    Another pedestrian here - no licence, nor any plans to get one. So...

    [​IMG]

    2006 Converse One Stars. Only a couple of hundred miles on them, but they're falling to bits, so they've been relegated to the rank of slippers. :D
     
  6. deelovely

    deelovely Practically Family

    Messages:
    617
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    Wow!!! SWEET ride!:rolleyes: :eusa_doh:
     
  7. WEEGEE

    WEEGEE Practically Family

    Messages:
    996
    Location:
    Albany , New York
    My 1963 Mercury Meteor

    53,000 Original miles:)


    [​IMG]
     
  8. Restorations and hot Rodders

    I had read an industry article about how the wealthy and the retirees are they ones that are the biggest group to get involved in old cars. The concentratration tends to be most about the cars that were cool when you were a kid, but there is a spill over to classic and true hot rodding. Another is that there is an actual vintage Japanese car market where people are restoring and even hot rodding old Toyotas and Datsuns (Nissans) as an afordable area for starters.

    But there still is the 32 Coupe and bucket T hot Rodders too. One Area is in hot rodding Flathead Ford V8's that is on an upswing today.
     
  9. Forgotten Man

    Forgotten Man One Too Many

    Yes, that's why the price for an original or stock restored '32-'49 Ford's are going for $25,000. to $80,000.:rolleyes:

    If I see another "Duce Coupe" with flames and digital gages I think I'll scream bloody murder! It's becoming so rediculess to see a rusty body of a '32 without a motor, trany, or axles being sold for $25,000+!!!

    I can live with customizing and hot rodding as long as they stick with Ford's and Chevy's... I saw for sale a 1932 Chrysler Royal Town Car (Considered a rather rare auto by collectors) customized and hot-rodded! I just about threw up!:eek: I mean, it's a classic for cryin' out loud... an early 30's Chrysler Royal? Might as well sup-up a one of a kind Duesenberg and make some REAL friends :rolleyes:

    Sorry, just had to vent... continue with the topic at hand... by the way, you all know what I drive... it's a '46 Plymouth... STOCK! lol
     
  10. MrNewportCustom

    MrNewportCustom Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,265
    Location:
    Outer Los Angeles
    Beautiful car, WEEGEE! Gotta love those beautiful luxury liners. (They are not barges!) :)

    Regarding the low mileage on my Chrysler when I got it, I called them "original miles" to a man I met at a car show. He grinned and said, "As opposed to non-original miles?" :D

    Great story, Bill Taylor. A wonderful memory you've shared with us. Thank you. I love memories like these. :)


    Lee
    ________________________

    I'e stopped saying, "Original miles." (Yes, I know, there are non-original miles where engine rebuilds or replacements are concerned. :D)
     
  11. MrNewportCustom

    MrNewportCustom Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,265
    Location:
    Outer Los Angeles
    Prepare to puke, FM. I've seen a couple of '30s Packards that were customized, and once saw that Boyd Coddinton was customizing a Cord 810. :cry: [bad]

    John. It's true about the Japanese car clubs and such. Not only are they strong in Japan, but I've heard of shows for hot rodded and restored Japanese cars as local to you and me as Long Beach. Personally, I'd like to go to one. I'd also like to own a 240Z and a couple other early cars from the Land of the Rising Sun - another '77 Corolla would also be nice. :) (My current automotive dream car from Japan - more recent, and recently discontinued car - is an Acura 3.2CL TypeS. I love the styling and finish. A beautiful car.)


    Lee
     
  12. Speedster

    Speedster Practically Family

    Messages:
    876
    Location:
    60 km west of København
    Very, very cool

    That is a very cool car. Normally i prefer original cars, but there are certain types of hot rods that i like a lot, and this is one of them. And even better it's an old build from from back when this was a quite normal thing to do to a cheap used car. I like this car a lot.:eusa_clap
     
  13. Flivver

    Flivver Practically Family

    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    New England
    Like you, I tend to prefer all original cars, but a real 50's hot rod like this takes me back to the late 50's when my best friend's older brothers were building rods like this in their parent's garage.

    A '32 Duce Coupe with a hotted up flathead V8 is very nice! And look at those nifty triple carbs!
     
  14. The real Henry

    The real Henry Practically Family

    Messages:
    512
    Location:
    Löhne, Germany


    Beautiful! How about some inside pictures?



    Regards,
    Henrik
     
  15. RIOT

    RIOT Practically Family

    Messages:
    708
    Location:
    N Y of C
    Wow! An impressive steel 3-window, and nicely kept to it's original 50's Hot Rod look. :eusa_clap

    Would your dad adopt me? :D
     
  16. RIOT

    RIOT Practically Family

    Messages:
    708
    Location:
    N Y of C
    Here's some update photos to that '51 Merc I sold last June.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I still don't understand why the buyer took off the '51/'52 Desoto 11 tooth grille I had on there and replaced it back with it's original, un-frenched the headlamps and took out the '49 Chevy headlights I had fitted, took off the Foxcraft fender skirts, and painted the rear bumper and taillight bezel..:(
     
  17. MaryDeluxe

    MaryDeluxe Practically Family

    Messages:
    794
    Location:
    Deluxeville!
    Because Riot....Original is always better ;) Why do you need to mess with perfection???

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  18. scarlett

    scarlett One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    296
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    [​IMG][/IMG]This my 1953 Buick Special, just got it about a month ago. It is completely stock and almost 100% (missing driver side int visor). I do have all the chrome, some pieces are off and in the garage. I love old cars, they have so much style they look good just sitting there.
     
  19. Flivver

    Flivver Practically Family

    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    New England
    That's a great car Scarlett. I've always had a weakness for Buicks of this era.

    And the '53 Special is historically significant since it was the last Buick to use a straight-8 engine. Up to 1953 when the Buick V8 was introduced in the Super and Roadmaster models, Buick had made nothing but straight-8s since 1931.

    Those overhead valve Buick straight-8s made a distinctive sound, unmatched by any other car.

    Does yours have Dynaflow or a manual transmission?
     
  20. scarlett

    scarlett One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    296
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Hi Flivver, it has the dynaflow. And to the contrary to all I've read, it really isn't that sluggish. The car cruises along just great. It's not a hotrod, I won't be breaking any land speed records in this baby. It is nice to slow down the pace and enjoy the ride. I love that it is all original, so that way it will stay for as long as I can find the parts. Since I got the car home I feel a certain responsibility to maintain it as is, a sort of living, rolling time piece.
    It's true - they don't make em like they used to.
     

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